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Neuroscience & Design

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Make your product more effective by considering how the brain works.

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Neuroscience & Design

  1. 1. Your brain on design How neuroscience helps us to make things work
  2. 2. Components of the brain Brain Stem: 300 million years old. Regulates base functions like breathing, safety, and core body functions. Limbic System: 200 million years old. The hub of reactive functions like emotions. Neocortex: 200,000 years old. Interprets conscious thought, and introduces logic. Prefrontal cortex: 30,000 years old. Gives humans reason and intellect.
  3. 3. System 1 & System 2 •System 1 is the "old brain" including brain stem and limbic system. We think of emotions and instincts as System 1 •System 2 are the "newer" parts, the neocortex and prefrontal cortex. Also shorthand for logic and analysis.
  4. 4. System 1 & System 2 Good branding has to work as both a signpost and an invitation •Use a rational appeal + emotional cues •Learn by association •Use visual codes to connect to your consumers’ goals
  5. 5. SCARF theory SCARF is a model for collaborating with and influencing others.
  6. 6. SCARF theory The brain's desires according to Social Neuroscience 1. Status: our importance relative to others 2. Certainty: the ability to predict the future 3. Autonomy: having a sense of control over events 4. Relatedness: feeling a sense of being safe with others 5. Fairness: the perception of fair exchanges between people
  7. 7. SCARF theory The brain's desires according to Social Neuroscience 1. Status: our importance relative to others 2. Certainty: the ability to predict the future 3. Autonomy: having a sense of control over events 4. Relatedness: feeling a sense of being safe with others 5. Fairness: the perception of fair exchanges between people
  8. 8. SCARF theory The brain's desires according to Social Neuroscience 1. Status: our importance relative to others 2. Certainty: the ability to predict the future 3. Autonomy: having a sense of control over events 4. Relatedness: feeling a sense of being safe with others 5. Fairness: the perception of fair exchanges between people
  9. 9. SCARF theory The brain's desires according to Social Neuroscience 1. Status: our importance relative to others 2. Certainty: the ability to predict the future 3. Autonomy: having a sense of control over events 4. Relatedness: feeling a sense of being safe with others 5. Fairness: the perception of fair exchanges between people
  10. 10. Cognitive Dissonance When attitudes, beliefs or thoughts conflict. •Create an investment in the user so they feel it's better to stay. •Provide small incentives to engage in unpleasant activities.
  11. 11. Eye-tracking "Making sure that the human eye is drawn towards a product through its design alone remains an important factor in sales, but this is 100% context dependent. Put simply, if everyone's dressed in red, being green wins." -Fabian Stelzer, EyeQuant CEO
  12. 12. F-Pattern How people typically read a webpage
  13. 13. The visual system •On small fonts, people tended to spend more time on each fixation (“gulp” of an eye, usually a group of three to six words). People had to spend more time and energy on each word. Fonts sized 10 and below had this problem. •On larger fonts, people had smaller and more frequent fixations. That means they were taking in fewer words per “visual gulp.” People remember more when they have to work harder.
  14. 14. Risk vs. Ambiguity Despite logic, humans often find high-risk, high - reward scenarios more appealing than those with low-risk, low-reward.
  15. 15. Our brains on brands The nucleus accumbens (NACC) is activated when a monetary, chocolate, sexual, luxury, or other reward is anticipated. The medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) is activated when a preferred brand is seen, when a loved one is imagined, or when a reward is received.
  16. 16. Approach vs. Reward
  17. 17. Choices Too many choices lead to poor decision-making.
  18. 18. Colour is hardwired
  19. 19. Stories Stories connect to many different aspects of the brain. •Visual - in our imagination •Vision and text processing •Auditory inputs •Event structure perception
  20. 20. Read more! Neuro Web Design by Susan Weinschenk Universal Principals of Design by William Lidwell, Kritina Holden and Jill Butler SCARF: Your Brain at Work (NeuroLeadership Journal)

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