FACULTY SALARIES INCH UP
Increase Just Matches Inflation
Findings from the AAUP Salary Survey

S

Faculty Salaries

Facult...
THE SECRET TO

A STABLE
RETIREMENT?
A STABLE INVESTMENT PROVIDER.

Last year, TIAA-CREF paid out $4.3 billion in retiremen...
CONTENTS
3

FACULTY PAY RISES SLIGHTLY

4

AS PUBLIC-PRIVATE PAY GAP WIDENS,
STATE UNIVERSITIES TRY TO HANG ON
TO FACULTY
...
ulty Salaries

CHECOR1246_Salary Survey RePrint v5.indd 4

Faculty Profile

9/20/13 11:29 AM
The Chronicle of Higher Education • April 12, 2013

FACULTY PAY
RISES SLIGHTLY
Pay increase of 1.7%, matching inflation,
p...
The Chronicle of Higher Education • April 12, 2013

AS PUBLIC-PRIVATE
GAP WIDENS, STATE
UNIVERSITIES TRY TO
HANG ON TO FAC...
The Chronicle of Higher Education • April 12, 2013

Daniel J. Hurley, director of state relations and policy

analysis at ...
The Chronicle of Higher Education • April 12, 2013

Mr. Barron, Florida State’s president, has been looking

But Mr. Barro...
The Chronicle of Higher Education • April 12, 2013

How the gap has grown over the past 10 years

Difference in Faculty Pa...
The Chronicle of Higher Education • April 12, 2013

COLLEGES BEGIN TO
REWARD PROFESSORS
FOR DOING WORK THAT
MATTERS TO THE...
The Chronicle of Higher Education • April 12, 2013

“I came to Bentley because I knew that I could do

this kind of work h...
The Chronicle of Higher Education • April 12, 2013

Pennsylvania State University at Lehigh Valley. She

pursued her inter...
The Chronicle of Higher Education • April 12, 2013

FOR FULL-TIME
INSTRUCTORS, WORK
OFF THE TENURE
TRACK BECOMES
ITS OWN C...
The Chronicle of Higher Education • April 12, 2013

“appears to be the largest to date focusing on contingent

“This job i...
The Chronicle of Higher Education • April 12, 2013

The AAUP report does show that not all full-time

instructors working ...
The Chronicle of Higher Education • April 12, 2013

Average Salaries of Full-Time Faculty Members, 2012-13
All Institution...
The Chronicle of Higher Education • April 12, 2013

Average Salaries of Full-Time Faculty Members, 2012-13
Private, Indepe...
ulty Profile

Salaries Over Time

For a complete view into the AAUP Salary Survey data,
including a look at how faculty sa...
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Faculty salary survey 2013 - Chronicle of Higher Ed

  1. 1. FACULTY SALARIES INCH UP Increase Just Matches Inflation Findings from the AAUP Salary Survey S Faculty Salaries Faculty Profile Salaries Over Time Sponsored by: CHECOR1246_Salary Survey RePrint v5.indd 1 9/20/13 11:29 AM
  2. 2. THE SECRET TO A STABLE RETIREMENT? A STABLE INVESTMENT PROVIDER. Last year, TIAA-CREF paid out $4.3 billion in retirement income.1 We help millions of people in nonprofit businesses plan and manage retirement, more than any other financial services provider.2 It’s how we deliver Outcomes That Matter for your employees. Nearly a century of lifetime income payments to get employees through retirement.3 Get started at tiaa-cref.org/lifetime. 1 In 2012, TIAA-CREF plan participants received annualized payments of $4.3 billion through TIAA-CREF lifetime annuity contracts. 2 Source: LIMRA, Not-for-Profit Market Survey, first-quarter 2013 results. Based on a survey of 29 companies. 3 Lifetime income is a guarantee subject to TIAA’s claims-paying ability. Investment, insurance and annuity products are not FDIC insured, are not bank guaranteed, are not deposits, are not insured by any federal government agency, are not a condition to any banking service or activity, and may lose value. TIAA-CREF Individual & Institutional Services, LLC and Teachers Personal Investors Services, Inc., members FINRA, distribute securities products. ©2013 Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association-College Retirement Equities Fund (TIAA-CREF), 730 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10017. C11882 TIAA-CREF products may be subject to market and other risk factors. See the applicable product literature, or visit tiaa-cref.org for details. Past performance does not guarantee future results. CHECOR1246_Salary Survey RePrint v5.indd 2 9/20/13 11:29 AM
  3. 3. CONTENTS 3 FACULTY PAY RISES SLIGHTLY 4 AS PUBLIC-PRIVATE PAY GAP WIDENS, STATE UNIVERSITIES TRY TO HANG ON TO FACULTY 8 COLLEGES BEGIN TO REWARD PROFESSORS FOR DOING WORK THAT ACTUALLY MATTERS TO THEM 11 FOR FULL-TIME INSTRUCTORS, WORK OFF THE TENURE TRACK BECOMES ITS OWN CAREER 14 Average Salaries of Full-Time Faculty Members, 2012-13 CHECOR1246_Salary Survey RePrint v5.indd 3 9/20/13 11:29 AM
  4. 4. ulty Salaries CHECOR1246_Salary Survey RePrint v5.indd 4 Faculty Profile 9/20/13 11:29 AM
  5. 5. The Chronicle of Higher Education • April 12, 2013 FACULTY PAY RISES SLIGHTLY Pay increase of 1.7%, matching inflation, puts average salary at $84,000 The news about faculty salaries is “not all bad,” says a report by the American Association of University Professors on the economic status of the profession. But it’s not all that great, either. The average faculty salary for 2012-13 is just over $84,000, reflecting an increase of 1.7 percent over last year. That matches the rate of inflation, marking the first time in four years that professors’ pay did not lose ground in that regard. Full-time professors who have remained at the same institutions received salary increases averaging 3.2 percent, marginally higher than in recent years. And growing numbers of colleges are broadening their reward systems for faculty, more often counting digital work and public-service oriented research in decisions about awarding raises, bonuses, promotions, and tenure. But the average pay increases for full-time faculty this year are well below the average level of annual increases over the past decade. And professors at public colleges are seeing their salaries fall ever further behind those of their peers at private colleges. For full-timers who work off the tenure track—now nearly two of every five full-time faculty members—data in the report show that the likelihood of their jumping to better-paying jobs on the tenure track is slim. “Important long-term trends,” the report says, “are still heading in the wrong direction for higher education.” — SARA HEBEL 3 CHECOR1246_Salary Survey RePrint v5.indd 5 9/20/13 11:29 AM
  6. 6. The Chronicle of Higher Education • April 12, 2013 AS PUBLIC-PRIVATE GAP WIDENS, STATE UNIVERSITIES TRY TO HANG ON TO FACULTY by SYDNI DUNN Eric J. Barron, president of Florida State University, is fighting a faculty exodus. Florida State isn’t the only public university hard put to find money for faculty salaries. Nationally, the gap between what public and private colleges pay their The university has struggled to retain good professors professors has only continued to grow, according to In fact, the president warned state officials last During this academic year, the average salary across because it’s been unable to reward them with big salary increases, or with any increases at all. year, budget cuts have started to turn his university into a “farm team” for institutions outside the state, a place where young faculty start their careers, gain experience, and soon take their training and expertise elsewhere. “We exceed our national ranking in every metric,” Mr. Barron says. “Where do we not exceed our rank? We don’t in terms of what we pay for faculty salaries and what we can invest in the academic program.” an annual report released by the American Association of University Professors. all faculty ranks at private colleges was $99,771, an increase of 2.4 percent from the previous academic year. At public colleges, the average salary was $80,578, a 1.3 percent increase. The public-sector disadvantage is greatest for full professors. At public master’s-level colleges, they earn 17 percent less than do their peers at private institutions. Those at public doctoral universities earn 35 percent less than their peers at private doctoral institutions, according to the report. 4 CHECOR1246_Salary Survey RePrint v5.indd 6 9/20/13 11:29 AM
  7. 7. The Chronicle of Higher Education • April 12, 2013 Daniel J. Hurley, director of state relations and policy analysis at the American Association of State Colleges and Universities, says some public universities haven’t been able to give any salary increases for the past four to five years because state budgets have remained tight. “That conversation is certainly not happening at private institutions,” he says. “Private institutions are able to recruit and pay for the top talent.” At Florida State, faculty salaries for the highest-ranked professors this academic year fall significantly below the average, according to the AAUP report. The average pay for full professors at Florida State is $109,400, which is 11 percent less than the average for those at all public doctoral institutions. “A legislature has to know and understand the stresses being applied.” For associate professors, the average pay at Florida State is $76,700, which is 9 percent less than the average for all public doctoral institutions. Assistant professors, however, earn 5 percent more at Florida State than their peers at public doctoral institutions, whose average salary is $77,100. “The salary offers that professors received for jobs elsewhere were as much as $20,000, or 28 percent, higher than their salaries on the Tallahassee, Fla., campus”, Mr. Barron says. “Our faculty love this university and love this region, but it’s tough to turn down something that’s a significant raise,” he says. Popular destinations for departing faculty have included public and private colleges in Georgia, Pennsylvania, and Texas. While public colleges in many states have seen their appropriations drop in recent years, Florida’s cuts have been among the deepest. State appropriations for higher education in Florida decreased by 31.3 percent from the 2008 to the 2013 fiscal years. Yuri Gershtein, a former assistant professor of physics at Florida State, says Rutgers University recruited him for its physics department in 2008. Mr. Gershtein, now an associate professor, says the salary offer, in terms of the dollar amount, was “a pretty significant bump” from his pay in Florida. “Florida State was always good at the initial offers, and that was the strategy,” he says. “The initial offer is high, but then the salary doesn’t grow.” Todd Adams, an associate professor of physics at Florida ‘TOUGH TO TURN DOWN’ State, says the “upheaval” of faculty makes it difficult to by both private and public institutions”, Mr. Barron says. one of best places they can be,” says Mr. Adams, who is a “Florida State’s faculty members have been lured away Of the 58 professors in the College of Arts and Sciences who were offered jobs at other universities last year, Florida State was able to persuade only eight to stay. recruit new professors. “You want to convince them they would be coming to member of the Faculty Senate. But “it’s hard to sing praises and say, ‘It’s going to be great, and your salary will keep going up,’ when it may not.” 5 CHECOR1246_Salary Survey RePrint v5.indd 7 9/20/13 11:29 AM
  8. 8. The Chronicle of Higher Education • April 12, 2013 Mr. Barron, Florida State’s president, has been looking But Mr. Barron’s message to state lawmakers is that So far this academic year, 36 professors from Florida institutions is allowed to continue to grow. for ways to improve retention and put more money into the faculty. State have moved elsewhere. But Mr. Barron says they will all be replaced. He even expects that the university will be able to add to its faculty. The university has found ways to save money, such as lowering campus energy consumption, and is putting more money toward some faculty pay raises “It is not in the position to do anything across the board,” he says, but there is enough money to provide some performance- based raises, including those accompanying promotions and given out at post tenure reviews. such increases are not enough, that Florida State and public universities like it will be left behind if the gap between their salaries and those of their peer private “Nobody wants to wave a white flag that says, ‘People are stealing my faculty,’ yet I think a legislature has to know and understand the stresses being applied,” Mr. Barron says. “If you want to be nationally competitive, if you want to have top ranks, if you want to keep the best and brightest, then don’t spend all your money sitting there getting a faculty member started and once they prove to be excellent have them go somewhere else.” 6 CHECOR1246_Salary Survey RePrint v5.indd 8 9/20/13 11:29 AM
  9. 9. The Chronicle of Higher Education • April 12, 2013 How the gap has grown over the past 10 years Difference in Faculty Pay Between Public and Private $100,000 Colleges Continues to Widen $90,000 How the gap has grown over the past 10 years $80,000 $70,000 $100,000 Gap in 2013: 24% $60,000 $90,000 $50,000 $80,000 Gap in 2004: 18% $40,000 $70,000 Gap in 2013: 24% $30,000 $60,000 $20,000 $50,000 Private colleges Average faculty salary at Gap in 2004: 18% $10,000 $40,000 Public colleges 0 $30,000 $20,000 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Private colleges Average faculty salary at $10,000 S 0 Faculty Salaries 2004 2005 2006 Faculty Profile 2007 2010 2008 2009 2011 2012 2013 Public colleges 2010 Salaries Over Time 2011 2012 2013 How faculty pay at public and private colleges differs in 2012-13 S Faculty Salaries Faculty Profile Private colleges Salaries Over Time Public colleges Average salary Average Average one-year salary increase How faculty pay at public and private colleges differs in 2012-13 Average one-year increase Full professor $139,620 colleges 3.0% Private $110,143 colleges 1.6% Public Associate professor Average $88,301 salary Average $78,529 salary Assistant professor Full professor Lecturer Associate professor All combined Assistant professor $74,664 $139,620 $56,530 $88,301 $99,771 $74,664 Average 2.0% one-year increase 2.3% 3.0% 3.3% 2.0% 2.4% 2.3% $67,097 $110,143 $46,926 $78,529 $80,578 $67,097 Average 1.5% one-year increase 2.0% 1.6% 1.7% 1.5% 1.3% 2.0% Lecturer $56,530 3.3% $46,926 1.7% All combined $99,771 2.4% $80,578 1.3% SOURCE: American Association of University Professors 7 CHECOR1246_Salary Survey RePrint v5.indd 9 9/20/13 11:29 AM
  10. 10. The Chronicle of Higher Education • April 12, 2013 COLLEGES BEGIN TO REWARD PROFESSORS FOR DOING WORK THAT MATTERS TO THEM by AUDREY WILLIAMS JUNE David W. Szymanski wanted to work at a college where in local communities, and innovative teaching. The change the policies they create, and produce scholarship about professors to pursue work that matters to them without fear he could do what he does best: teach students how science can be used to solve real-world problems, help policy makers understand the link between science and teaching and learning. But he worried that the kind of work he does—much of it interdisciplinary and public-oriented—wouldn’t amount to much in the faculty-reward systems in place on many campuses. What often counts most in decisions about promotions, pay, and performance evaluations is having lots of highly cited research published in well-known, peer-reviewed journals, and being able to win large amounts of grant money. But a growing number of institutions are adopting more inclusive reward systems for faculty, with increased recognition for non-traditional kinds of research, service reflects shifts in scholarship and research in a world of rapidly changing technology, in which new forms of digital work are emerging. The new systems are also creating avenues for that they will derail otherwise promising careers. Mr. Szymanski, a geologist and forensic scientist, started working at Bentley University in 2009 as an assistant professor of natural and environmental sciences. Bentley, in Waltham, Mass., is one institution that is broadening the scope of faculty work that it recognizes and rewards, not least in decisions about salary increases and bonuses. He has received a merit-based raise to reward his successes, particularly his creation of a popular undergraduate course that gives students hands-on experience in how science and scientific data relates to federal environmental policies. Students in the course go to Washington to share their research with policy makers. 8 CHECOR1246_Salary Survey RePrint v5.indd 10 9/20/13 11:29 AM
  11. 11. The Chronicle of Higher Education • April 12, 2013 “I came to Bentley because I knew that I could do this kind of work here,” says Mr. Szymanski, who won the university’s top teaching award for 2011 in recognition of the course. He was also an author of a peer-reviewed journal article, published last year, about how to use public-sector research projects to engage undergraduates. “Publishing in journals isn’t going away, but ... we also reward people for the work that matters to them.” Professors like Mr. Szymanski are among the kinds of people the business-oriented university is interested in considering for new bonuses, says Daniel L. Everett, dean of arts and sciences. Bentley will decide in mid- April which several dozen professors will receive onetime awards of about $5,000. Department chairs will recommend candidates, and the decisions will be made by the provost. One goal is to include professors whose work is beneficial to Bentley but may fall under the radar of the traditional faculty-reward structure. “People often think, ‘You’re only going to reward me if I do research,’” Mr. Everett says. “Publishing in journals isn’t going away, but we’re not overlooking everything else. We want to make sure that we also reward people for the work that matters to them.” That kind of recognition can go a long way in an environment where salary increases have barely kept pace with inflation in recent years. A new report on the economic state of higher education, released this week by the American Association of University Professors, found that, on average, pay for faculty members rose only 1.7 percent this academic year. The increase matches inflation, but only because inflation is so low. UNDERVALUED SCHOLARSHIP Other institutions, too, have taken steps to embrace nontraditional forms of scholarship. Michigan State, Portland State, and Syracuse Universities are among those that have changed their tenure-and-promotion policies to recognize public scholarship as much as more-traditional activities like writing books and publishing in scholarly journals. James S. Fairweather, a professor of higher, adult, and lifelong education at Michigan State who studies faculty roles and rewards, says conversations about how to best document and reward the full scope of faculty work have gained traction. He expects that to trigger “some support for broader concepts of faculty contributions.” KerryAnn O’Meara, an associate professor of higher education at the University of Maryland at College Park, agrees. There are routine tasks, she says, that faculty do that “don’t show up on their CV and don’t show up in annual reports of their time.” Among those, she says, are mentoring graduate students, directing institutional programs, writing letters of recommendation, and marketing programs to attract new students. Also often undervalued is scholarship in which professors use their expertise to explore issues in their communities. There are more people involved in community engagement than ever before, Ms. O’Meara says. Yet the path for career advancement for such scholars is still largely unpredictable. Mary C. Hutchinson became involved in communityengaged scholarship while teaching writing at 9 CHECOR1246_Salary Survey RePrint v5.indd 11 9/20/13 11:29 AM
  12. 12. The Chronicle of Higher Education • April 12, 2013 Pennsylvania State University at Lehigh Valley. She pursued her interest in ways teachers could better support English-as-a-second-language learners enrolled in the public-school system. “Because I wasn’t in a tenure-track position, I was free to do what I wanted,” says Ms. Hutchinson, who once worked as an administrator and then as a lecturer in English for seven years. She earned a doctorate in education and with the degree was hired as an assistant professor of ESL education at Penn State. Then she scholarship on her campus—and throughout higher education, while the Faculty Senate at Syracuse voted to make changes to the university’s tenure and promotion policies so that assessing public scholarship in its many forms would be possible. Overhauling the faculty-reward system won’t work without a broad shift in the attitudes of professors, especially the ones who determine whether the scholarship of their peers measures up. Simply adding metrics or categories of work to evaluate as part of began to face pressure from senior administrators and faculty-reward systems won’t work, says Michigan State’s “I wanted to just go ahead with what I was doing,” says “Unless administrators are willing to have conversations colleagues, on and off the campus, she says, to acquire a solid publication record that reflected what she was doing in the community. Ms. Hutchinson, who also does research on service learning. “It only took the second-year review to see that wasn’t going to cut it.” So she “did double the work,” she recalls, both to continue the research that mattered most to her and to make sure she was getting articles published to bolster her case for tenure, which she earned last year. What can help public scholarship become more important to academics’ careers? A critical mass of professors involved in such work, or of high-profile scholars who have made a commitment to it, Ms. O’Meara says. “I’ve also seen that the larger the campus, the more important it is that people are on board at every level,” she says. “You need to have a provost or a president advocating for it, but you also need the faculty on a campus saying, This is something that we really want to do.” At Syracuse University, for instance, the institution’s chancellor, Nancy Cantor, is a vocal supporter of public Mr. Fairweather, unless colleges make more of an effort to try to encourage people to “think about what really matters—and that’s a different kind of conversation.” with people who are on promotion-and-tenure committees, nothing changes,” he says. “What matters is what those people value. At some point, institutions are going to have to confront that.” Mary T. Huber, a consulting scholar at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, says she’s confident that new forms of scholarship will get the standing they deserve. “There is a growing cadre of people who have done scholarship in these new areas, and they will be the ones to educate others about it and serve as peer reviewers,” Ms. Huber says. “If the work that’s being done is actually meritorious, expands the imagination, expands knowledge, and improves practice, I believe it’s going to win out in the end.” At Bentley, Mr. Szymanski is hopeful that his work will mean success when he goes up for tenure. “They’ve already said the kind of work I do is valued,” he says, “so that’s why I keep doing it.” 10 CHECOR1246_Salary Survey RePrint v5.indd 12 9/20/13 11:29 AM
  13. 13. The Chronicle of Higher Education • April 12, 2013 FOR FULL-TIME INSTRUCTORS, WORK OFF THE TENURE TRACK BECOMES ITS OWN CAREER by ROBIN WILSON When Denise K. Comer snagged a prestigious postdoctoral position at Duke University shortly after finishing her Ph.D. in English, she was sure the position would set her up for a tenure-track job down the line. Thirteen years later, Ms. Comer is still at Duke, working full time but off the tenure track, as director of the university’s first-year writing program. “I thought I’d launch myself into a tenure-stream position, but that changed,” she says. Her goals shifted as she had three children, and as the job at Duke— which she originally saw as a natural steppingstone to the tenure track—provided unexpected opportunities that she came to enjoy. A new report on the economic status of the professoriate shows that Ms. Comer’s story is typical among the 284,000 people who teach full-time off the tenure track. While such instructors may have envisioned eventually landing jobs within academe’s tenured ranks, many have instead spent their careers working in full-time contract positions with lower pay and less job security than tenured professors enjoy. The possibility that these full-timers will ever be considered for tenure-track jobs is slim, the report shows. The report, released April 8 by the American Association of University Professors, includes some of the most extensive data yet on the salaries and working conditions of non-tenure-track instructors, who account for nearly 40 percent of the full-time academic work force. The data come from a survey of 7,500 such instructors by the Coalition on the Academic Workforce, a group of highereducation and scholarly-discipline associations. John W. Curtis, director of research and public policy at the AAUP and an author of the report, said the survey 11 CHECOR1246_Salary Survey RePrint v5.indd 13 9/20/13 11:29 AM
  14. 14. The Chronicle of Higher Education • April 12, 2013 “appears to be the largest to date focusing on contingent “This job is not transparent from the very beginning,” better working conditions than do part-time adjuncts. steppingstone, when it’s not.” academics.” Full-time contingent faculty members certainly enjoy Full-timers typically work on one-year to three-year contracts, says the AAUP report, and most are paid an annual salary, which averaged about $47,500 a year in 2010, the year the survey was conducted. But, for many, a job they considered temporary has become a career. Nearly 40 percent of the full-time instructors surveyed by the coalition said they had been teaching off the tenure track for at least a decade, and most who hold such positions are pushing middle age: 80 percent are 36 or older. Their pay is much better than that of part-time adjuncts, who the AAUP report says earn an average of $2,700 per course, but they still earn substantially less than tenure-rank faculty members, who made an average of $84,332 in 2010. NOT A STEPPINGSTONE Ms. Comer isn’t certain anymore whether landing a tenure-track post is her goal. She loves her job and even turned down a tenure-track offer from another university because the position wasn’t a match for the one she has at Duke. “I’d built such a network at Duke of people, resources, and opportunities it would take two or more years somewhere else to get that going again,” she says. Even if Ms. Comer does decide she wants to pursue a tenure-track job at Duke, though, the coalition’s survey seems to show that achieving it wouldn’t be easy. Just 3 percent of those surveyed said they were given priority consideration on their campuses when tenure-track jobs came open. says Maria C. Maisto, president of the New Faculty Majority, a national group that represents contingent faculty members. “People are often told this is a Don Eron has taught writing and rhetoric full time at the University of Colorado at Boulder for 20 years. He says he earns about $50,000 a year, has excellent health benefits, and is building a retirement fund. But he wishes he had tenure. It would give him greater job security and the freedom to say unpopular things. “After a while you want to contribute your expertise and knowledge about pedagogy to your program,” he says. “But if your point of view differs from the director, you are discouraged from doing so.” “At your own institution, they already have your intellectual capital, so it doesn’t add anything for them to promote you.” Mr. Eron, though, doesn’t expect to ever get tenure at Boulder, or anywhere else. “If you are applying for jobs at your own institution, they already have your intellectual capital, so it doesn’t add anything for them to promote you,” he says. And full-time instructors who apply for tenure-track jobs elsewhere often carry a stigma: “If you haven’t been able to get tenure where you are, they wonder, how good can you be? You are wearing that scarlet letter.” 12 CHECOR1246_Salary Survey RePrint v5.indd 14 9/20/13 11:29 AM
  15. 15. The Chronicle of Higher Education • April 12, 2013 The AAUP report does show that not all full-time instructors working off the tenure track are qualified for Mr. Eron, 59, has an M.F.A., which is considered a terminal degree for teaching creative writing but not tenure-track jobs. While just over half of those for tenure-track professors in his field, rhetoric master’s in business administration. instructor will end how it began: without tenure. surveyed said they held doctorates, 28 percent had only a master’s degree. That figure does not include people with terminal degrees, like a master’s of fine arts or a and composition. He is getting ready to retire, and his career as a college Limits on Pay and Support for Full-Time Faculty Off the Tenure Track With fixed-term appointments and limited support from their colleges, full-time faculty who work off the tenure track— a growing proportion of the professoriate—effectively constitute a “second tier of the academic labor structure,” the American Association of University Professors says in this year’s report on the economic status of faculty. Median salaries for full-time faculty who are off the tenure track Median salaries for full-time faculty who are off the tenure track Median salaries for full-time faculty who are off the tenure track Median salaries for full-time faculty who are off the tenure track $47,500 $47,500 $47,500 $47,500 $45,000 $45,000 $45,000 $45,000 $51,000 $51,000 $51,000 $51,000 All Private, nonMedian salaries for full-time faculty Public off the tenure track who are All Public Private, noncolleges All colleges $47,500 All colleges colleges $45,000 colleges Public colleges $51,000 Public colleges colleges profit colleges Private, nonprofit colleges $50,000 Private, nonprofit colleges profit colleges $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 Private, forPrivate, forprofit colleges Private, forprofit colleges Private, forprofit colleges profit colleges % of full-time faculty off the tenure track who report having access to % of full-time faculty off the tenure track who report having access to various types of institutional support and who report having access to % of full-time of Public off the tenure trackPrivate, forAll Private, nonvarious types faculty off the tenure track who report having access to institutional support and activities activities % colleges of full-time faculty colleges profit colleges profit colleges various types of institutional support and activities various types of institutional support and activities Participation in departmental meetings Participation in departmental meetings Participation in departmental meetings % of full-time faculty off the tenure track who report having access to Participation in departmental meetings various types of institutional support and activities Support for travel to professional meetings Support for travel to professional meetings Participation in departmental meetings Support for travel to professional meetings 52.9% 77.6% 52.9% Support for travel to professional meetings Support for travel to professional meetings 52.9% Ability to submit research grants with institutional support 52.9% Ability to submit research grants with institutional support 52.9% 41.1% Ability to submit research grants with institutional support Ability to submit researchresearch grants with institutional support 41.1% Ability to submit grants with institutional support 41.1% 41.1% Priority consideration for tenure-track openings 41.1% Priority consideration for tenure-track openings Priority consideration for tenure-track openings 3.1% Priority consideration for tenure-track openings 3.1% 3.1% Priority consideration for tenure-track openings 3.1% Note: Data are for fall 2010, the most recent available. Note:3.1% are for fall 2010, the most recent available. Data 77.6% 77.6% 77.6% 77.6% Note: Data are for fall 2010, the most recent available. Note: Data are for fall 2010, the most recent available. Note: Data are for fall 2010, the most recent available. SOURCE: American Association of University Professors’ analysis of the survey of contingent faculty members and instructors, Fall 2010, by Coalition on the Academic Workforce 13 CHECOR1246_Salary Survey RePrint v5.indd 15 9/20/13 11:29 AM
  16. 16. The Chronicle of Higher Education • April 12, 2013 Average Salaries of Full-Time Faculty Members, 2012-13 All Institutions Public Salary 1-year change Men’s salary Women’s salary Women’s salary as a percentage of men’s $134,747 2.6% $137,908 $124,511 90.3% Professor Associate professor $88,306 2.1% $90,945 $84,377 92.8% Assistant professor $76,822 2.6% $80,260 $72,973 Instructor $51,116 2.4% $52,732 Lecturer $57,225 — No rank $68,153 All Salary 1-year change $123,393 2.1% Professor Associate professor $84,275 1.9% Associate profe 90.9% Assistant professor $73,212 2.6% Assistant profe $50,008 94.8% Instructor $48,359 2.4% Instructor $61,034 $54,112 88.7% Lecturer $54,382 — Lecturer — $73,345 $63,377 86.4% No rank $55,905 — No rank $96,686 2.0% $105,584 $82,522 78.2% All $89,657 1.7% Professor $92,522 1.0% $94,333 $89,076 94.4% Professor $88,988 0.6% Professor Associate professor $73,103 1.2% $74,566 $71,351 95.7% Associate professor $71,343 1.0% Associate profe Assistant professor $62,184 1.6% $63,495 $61,052 96.2% Assistant professor $61,041 1.3% Assistant profe Instructor $47,098 2.3% $47,916 $46,623 97.3% Instructor $45,258 2.0% Instructor Lecturer $49,626 — $51,135 $48,506 94.9% Lecturer $48,086 — Lecturer No rank $55,624 — $58,604 $52,962 90.4% No rank $51,506 — No rank All $71,620 1.1% $75,843 $66,819 88.1% All $69,149 0.8% Professor $91,935 1.9% $83,161 $89,602 107.7% Professor $86,427 1.1% Professor Associate professor $70,334 1.7% $71,264 $69,232 97.1% Associate professor $70,066 1.2% Associate profe Assistant professor $58,406 2.0% $59,053 $57,819 97.9% Assistant professor $58,591 1.5% Assistant profe Instructor $47,915 2.9% $48,331 $47,666 98.6% Instructor $48,798 3.5% Instructor Lecturer $52,116 — $54,001 $50,701 93.9% Lecturer $49,064 — Lecturer No rank $58,028 — $61,598 $54,277 88.1% No rank $45,904 — No rank All $70,774 1.9% $74,086 $66,882 90.3% All $66,298 1.2% Doctoral institutions Professor Doctoral institutions Master’s institutions Doctoral inst Master’s institutions Baccalaureate institutions Master’s inst Baccalaureate institutions Two-year institutions with academic ranks All All Baccalaureat All Two-year institutions with academic ranks Two-year ins Professor $74,526 –0.7% $75,076 $73,930 98.5% Professor $74,845 –0.7% Professor Associate professor $60,821 –0.8% $61,799 $59,985 97.1% Associate professor $60,876 –0.8% Associate profe Assistant professor $52,643 –1.0% $52,985 $52,365 98.8% Assistant professor $52,754 –1.0% Assistant profe Instructor $45,244 –1.6% $45,484 $45,052 99.1% Instructor $45,314 –1.7% Instructor Lecturer $45,824 — $45,953 $45,747 99.6% Lecturer $45,819 — Lecturer No rank $40,226 — $39,502 $40,668 103.0% No rank $41,685 — No rank All $58,884 –1.0% $60,145 $57,774 96.1% All $59,002 –1.1% 1.1% $63,046 $62,075 98.5% $116,419 2.1% $120,797 $105,402 87.3% Professor Associate professor $80,116 1.7% $82,628 $76,797 92.9% Assistant professor $68,025 2.1% $70,781 $65,321 Instructor $48,725 2.0% $49,802 Lecturer $54,475 — No rank $64,343 All $84,303 Two-year institutions without academic ranks All $62,523 Two-year institutions without academic ranks All institutions with academic ranks Professor All Two-year ins All All $62,776 1.0% All institutions with academic ranks All institution $110,143 1.6% Professor Associate professor $78,529 1.5% Associate profe 92.3% Assistant professor $67,097 2.0% Assistant profe $48,024 96.4% Instructor $46,926 1.7% Instructor $57,563 $52,045 90.4% Lecturer $51,965 — Lecturer — $68,880 $60,141 87.3% No rank $54,005 — No rank 1.7% $91,994 $73,932 80.4% All $80,578 1.3% All 14 CHECOR1246_Salary Survey RePrint v5.indd 16 9/20/13 11:29 AM
  17. 17. The Chronicle of Higher Education • April 12, 2013 Average Salaries of Full-Time Faculty Members, 2012-13 Private, Independent Religious Salary ar ge 1-year change Doctoral institutions Salary 1-year change Doctoral institutions % Professor $167,118 3.4% Professor $139,194 2.6% % Associate professor $104,016 2.4% Associate professor $94,199 2.7% % Assistant professor $90,622 2.1% Assistant professor $79,849 2.1% % Instructor $63,269 3.7% Instructor $63,830 0.4% — Lecturer $66,519 — Lecturer $58,942 — — No rank $77,561 — No rank $73,557 — % All $120,701 2.6% $100,093 2.2% $104,186 1.6% Master’s institutions All Master’s institutions % Professor Professor $94,031 2.1% % Associate professor $78,125 1.6% Associate professor $73,114 1.4% % Assistant professor $66,050 1.9% Assistant professor $61,487 2.2% % Instructor $52,899 3.4% Instructor $51,987 3.1% — Lecturer $58,312 — Lecturer $52,966 — — No rank $66,503 — No rank $62,292 — % All $79,438 1.7% All $72,529 1.9% $104,335 2.2% Baccalaureate institutions Baccalaureate institutions % Professor Professor $78,629 1.8% % Associate professor $76,993 2.1% Associate professor $63,244 1.3% % Assistant professor $62,763 2.2% Assistant professor $53,901 2.1% % Instructor $49,990 2.4% Instructor $45,802 2.4% — Lecturer $60,939 — Lecturer $43,831 — — No rank $63,581 — No rank $50,134 — % All $80,109 2.2% All $63,092 1.9% Two-year institutions with academic ranks Two-year institutions with academic ranks % Professor — — Professor — — % Associate professor — — Associate professor — — % Assistant professor — — Assistant professor — — % Instructor — — Instructor — — — Lecturer — — Lecturer — — — No rank — — No rank — — % All — — All — — % Two-year institutions without academic ranks All — Two-year institutions without academic ranks — All institutions with academic ranks All — — All institutions with academic ranks $139,620 3.0% Professor $100,351 2.4% NOTE: Associate professor $88,301 2.0% Associate professor $74,602 1.6% % Assistant professor $74,664 2.3% Assistant professor $61,881 2.3% 2.9% Dollar figures are based on data from 1,142 institutions; percentage changes are based on data from 1,095 institutions that reported comparable data for both years. As a result, the percentage changes refer to a slightly different set of dollar figures than those shown. Percentages are not adjusted for inflation. Dollar figures do not reflect all pay reductions caused by unpaid furloughs attributed to the recession. The figures cover full-time members of the instructional staff, except those in medical schools. The salaries are adjusted to a standard ninemonth work year. A dash indicates that no data were reported. % Professor % % Instructor $56,530 3.3% Instructor $51,950 — Lecturer $64,480 — Lecturer $53,751 — — No rank $74,042 — No rank $67,657 — % All $99,771 2.4% All $75,857 2.1% SOURCE: American Association of University Professors 15 CHECOR1246_Salary Survey RePrint v5.indd 17 9/20/13 11:29 AM
  18. 18. ulty Profile Salaries Over Time For a complete view into the AAUP Salary Survey data, including a look at how faculty salaries have changed over time, go to Chronicle.com/salarysurvey CHECOR1246_Salary Survey RePrint v5.indd 18 9/20/13 11:29 AM
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  20. 20. Sponsored by: 1255 Twenty-Third Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20037 (202) 466-1000 | Chronicle.com Copyright © 2013 CHECOR1246_Salary Survey RePrint v5.indd 20 9/20/13 11:29 AM

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