Why Customer-Driven Content is the Gold Standard for Documentation

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Why Customer-Driven Content is the Gold Standard for Documentation

  1. 1. Prepared by © 2010 Lasselle-Ramsay Presented by Part II of DITA in Production Why Customer-Driven Content is the Gold Standard for Documentation Presented by Joan Lasselle, Lasselle-Ramsay, Inc. Chip Gettinger, SDL, VP, XML Solutions
  2. 2. Who Is Your Customer?
  3. 3. Poll • Learn • Confirm existing knowledge • Practical, proven approach
  4. 4. What We’ll Be Exploring Today Defining customer-driven content Developing personas Linking personas to the content New content delivery capability and models
  5. 5. What is Customer-Driven Content?
  6. 6. Content Infrastructure
  7. 7. Revenue Drivers Return Business Increased Purchase Referrals Feedback
  8. 8. Content Infrastructure
  9. 9. Lots of Content, Only One Set of Eyes
  10. 10. The Power of Personas: A Face, a Name and a Voice “An idiot from the street should be able to run the machine after 5 minutes.” Tim Seller “Doctors are so dependent on the techs. That’s why it’s so important to know the ins and outs, to be able to troubleshoot.” Vicki U.S. Operator Dr. Fischer Clinician “The less you use the device, the less time you’re interested in investing in it.” Kaito Japanese Operator “I don’t have enough time to learn a new system. I need to work and making time to learn is hard.”
  11. 11. User Persona Snapshot “I’m okay with the start up documentation that I was given. It’s a little bit harder without a mentor.” Ron Experienced Designer Naveen System Architect James PCB Designer Eesha New Designer “The need for information changes depending on where you are in the design process.” “Documentation and FAE are critical to our success.” “Will not start the design process until I have complete information.” “I’m okay with the start up documentation that I was given. It’s a little bit harder without a mentor.”
  12. 12. Understanding the User: How You Can Learn Know your customers Know what your customers need to know and do Know the content they need and how they need to receive it
  13. 13. User Personas • Demographic description • Job responsibilities • Technical profile • Personal profile – Goals, needs, and anxieties – Problem-solving approach • Learning style – Basic learning approach – Best and worst learning experience – Obstacles to attaining proficiency
  14. 14. User Scenarios • Used to build use cases and requirements • Reflects goals that link to proficiencies • Based in reality – a day in the life • Shows team interaction
  15. 15. Task Analysis Clinician s Operator s System Admin Bio-med Tech Field Service Traine r Suppo rt Task — User Tasks — Understand workflow • • • • • • • Prepare the system • • Login • • Perform a session for a new case • • Create case information • • Edit or delete a usage profile • • Start & stop recording for a manual run • • Start & stop automatic pullback • • Review run • • Create or delete a bookmark • • Edit a bookmark • • Clinicians Operators SystemAdmin Bio-medTech FieldService Trainer Support Sellers Approvers
  16. 16. Customer Lifecycle Lifecycle X X
  17. 17. Content: There’s lots of it and it’s messy
  18. 18. The Multiplier Effect Page count: 400 Page count: 2,000 Page count: 8,000
  19. 19. Poll • Working in MS Word • Using unstructured FrameMaker • Using an XML authoring tool • Using XML authoring and component content management
  20. 20. To Manage – a Paradigm Shift • Content locked in context • Information can’t easily appear in multiple context and can’t be tailored readily to audience • High costs of formatting • Content gets out of synch and difficult to refresh • Customers can’t find what they need • XML Topic Methodology • Content can be reshuffled for deliverable • Same content can live in multiple outputs • Content can be delivered easily as web pages to consume • Metadata and conditions can allow content to be tailored on the fly • Content can be easily refreshed Traditional Book Methodology XML and Dynamic Publishing Methodology
  21. 21. Flexibility of Topics to Manage Variants Variations Of Deliverables Market Segments Variations in Customer Profiles Product Variations
  22. 22. Dynamic Publishing Business Benefits • Customer satisfaction tied to revenue – Ability to find content faster – Get content relevant to me – Provide feedback to content developer • Reduced cost of goods – Ability to see what content is used and not used by consumers – Reduce and eliminate content and translation for content not used • Control Call Center costs – Updated and relevant content quickly drives down calls to call centers – Content easier to find drives down call center calls • Profiling of users – See how customers use content – What content is consumed most frequently? – What content is never consumed?
  23. 23. Content Infrastructure
  24. 24. Process: Map It
  25. 25. Team: Who’s on the Bus?
  26. 26. Continuous Improvement
  27. 27. Focus on the User, the Rest Follows Defining customer-driven content Developing personas Linking personas to the content New content delivery capability and models
  28. 28. SDL Discovery Day Process • SDL assists you in finding business value • Provides focus and ability to refine strategies • Process of interviews with key individuals – Understand specifics nature of your business – Share best practices and ideas deployed by other companies • Share results and ROI
  29. 29. Contact Us Joan Lasselle Joan.Lasselle@LR.com (650) 968-1220 http://cia.lr.com www.LR.com Chip Gettinger CGettinger@SDL.com (415) 378-3791 www.SDL.com

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