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Negotiation Lewecki Ch 10 Relationships in Negotiation[sav lecture]

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Negotiation Lewecki Ch 10 Relationships in Negotiation[sav lecture]

  1. 1. 10-1<br />Relationships, Trust and Reputation in Negotiation<br />
  2. 2. Four Key Dimensions of Relationships<br />
  3. 3. 10-3<br />Key Elements in Managing Negotiations within Relationships<br />Reputation<br />Trust<br />
  4. 4. 10-4<br />Key Elements in Managing Negotiations within Relationships<br />Reputation<br />Perceptual and highly subjective in nature<br />An individual can have a number of different, even conflicting, reputations<br />Influenced by an individual’s personal characteristics and accomplishments.<br />Develops over time; once developed, is hard to change. <br />Negative reputations are difficult to “repair”<br />
  5. 5. 10-5<br />Key Elements in Managing Negotiations within Relationships<br />Trust<br />“An individual’s belief in and willingness to act on the words, actions and decisions of another”<br />Three things that contribute to trust<br />Individual’s chronic disposition toward trust<br />Situation factors <br />History of the relationship between the parties<br />
  6. 6. Key Elements in Managing Negotiations within Relationships<br />Two different types of trust:<br />Rules (Calculus-based trust)<br />Individual will do what they say because they are rewarded for keeping their word or they fear the consequences of not doing what they say<br />Relationship (Identification-based trust)<br />Identification with the other’s desires and intentions. The parties effectively understand and appreciate each other’s wants; mutual understanding is developed to the point that each can effectively act for the other.<br />
  7. 7. 10-7<br />Key Elements in Managing Negotiations within Relationships<br />Trust (cont.)<br />Trust is different from distrust<br />Trust is considered to be confident positive expectations of another’s conduct<br />Distrust is defined as confident negative expectations of another’s conduct – i.e., we can confidently predict that some other people will act to take advantage of us<br />Trust and distrust can co-exist in a relationship<br />
  8. 8. Building a Win Win Relationship<br />Transform personal conflict into task conflict ( Interests vs. positions)<br />Agree on a common goal or shared vision<br />Find a shared problem or shared enemy<br />Focus on the future<br />
  9. 9. How to Build Trust<br />Similarity-attraction effect (same boat)<br />Mere exposure (affinity)<br />Physical presence<br />Reciprocity<br />Schmoozing<br />Flattery<br />Self-disclosure<br />
  10. 10. How to Avoid Mistrust<br />Breaches or defections<br />Miscommunication<br />Poor pie expansion<br />Threats<br />Focusing on the “bad apple”<br />False representations<br />
  11. 11. How to Fix a Breach of Trust<br />Arrange a personal meeting<br />Put the focus on the relationship<br />Apologize <br />Let them vent<br />Do not get defensive<br />Ask for clarifying information<br />Test your understanding<br />Formulate a plan<br />Think about ways to prevent a future problem<br />Do relationship check-up at a scheduled date<br />
  12. 12. 10-12<br />Actions To Manage Different Forms of Trust in Negotiations<br />How to increase calculus-based trust <br />Create and meet the other party's expectations<br />Stress the benefits of creating mutual trust<br />Establish credibility; make sure statements are honest and accurate<br />Keep promises; follow through on commitments<br />Develop a good reputation<br />How to increase identification-based trust <br />Develop similar interests<br />Develop similar goals and objectives<br />Act and respond like the other<br />Stand for the same principles, values and ideals<br />©2006 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., All Rights Reserved<br />McGraw-Hill/Irwin<br />
  13. 13. Actions To Manage Different Forms of Trust in Negotiations<br />How to manage calculus-based distrust<br />Monitor the other party’s actions<br />Prepare formal agreements<br />Build in plans for “inspecting” and verifying commitments<br />Be vigilant of the other’s actions; monitor personal boundaries<br />How to manage identification-based distrust<br />Expect disagreements<br />Assume that the other party will exploit or take advantage of you; monitor your boundaries regularly<br />Verify information, commitments and promises of the other party<br />Minimize interdependence and self-disclosure<br />“The best offense is a good defense”<br />
  14. 14. Recent Research on Trust and Negotiation<br />Good news about trust and negotiation behavior:<br />Many people approach a new relationship with an unknown other party with remarkably high levels of trust<br />Trust tends to cue cooperative behavior<br />Individual motives also shape trust and expectations of the other’s behavior<br />Greater expectations of trust between negotiators leads to greater information sharing<br />Greater information sharing enhances effectiveness in achieving a good negotiation outcome<br />
  15. 15. Recent Research on Trust and Negotiation<br />Did you know:<br />Trust increases the likelihood that negotiation will proceed on a favorable course over the life of a negotiation<br />Face-to-face negotiation encourages greater trust development than negotiation online<br />Negotiators who are representing other’s interests, rather than their own interests, tend to behave in a less trusting way<br />
  16. 16. 10-16<br />Key Elements in Managing Negotiations within Relationships<br />Justice<br /> Can take several forms:<br />Distributive justice<br />The distribution of outcomes<br />Procedural justice<br />The process of determining outcomes<br />Interactional justice<br />How parties treat each other in one-to-one relationships<br />Systemic justice<br />How organizations appear to treat groups of individuals<br />©2006 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., All Rights Reserved<br />McGraw-Hill/Irwin<br />
  17. 17. Repairing a Relationship<br />10-17<br />Diagnostic steps in beginning to work on improving a relationship:<br />What might be causing any present misunderstanding, and what can I do to understand it better?<br />What might be causing a lack of trust, and what can I do to begin to repair trust that might have been broken?<br />
  18. 18. 10-18<br />Repairing a Relationship<br />Diagnostic steps (cont.):<br />What might be causing one or both of us to feel coerced, and what can I do to put the focus on persuasion rather than coercion?<br />What might be causing one or both of us to feel disrespected, and what can I do to demonstrate acceptance and respect?<br />
  19. 19. 10-19<br />Repairing a Relationship<br />Diagnostic steps (cont.):<br />What might be causing one or both of us to get upset, and what can I do to balance emotion and reason?<br />©2006 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., All Rights Reserved<br />McGraw-Hill/Irwin<br />

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