Supporting African
Landscape Objectives
Through Local
Landscape Governance
Louise Buck, EcoAgriculture Partners
and Cornel...
Introduction
As landscape approaches to pursuing food
production, ecosystem service conservation and
livelihood security i...
Landscape Governance
Concerned with the
institutional arrangements,
decision-making processes,
policy instruments and
unde...
Landscape Governance Challenges
• Multi-level, multi-actor governance inhibits
integrated landscape management
• Divergent...
Viable Landscape Governance
Requires
• Knowledge of existing institutional
infrastructure and knowledge resources
• Metric...
Diverse Models of Landscape
Governance Emerging
• LPFN review of 87 integrated landscape initiatives
in 33 African countri...
Landcare in South Africa
• South African National Landcare Program,
governed by Land Use and Soil Management
Directorate w...
Landcare in Uganda
• Governance occurs at participatory, grassroots
level enabled through district government
• Kapchorwa ...
Northern Rangeland Trust in Kenya
• Mission to develop resilient community
conservancies focusses on community-led decisio...
African Model Forest Network
Platforms are established to help
overcome weak links among forest
management units and mitig...
Lessons for Putting into Practice
Viable Systems that Account for
Multiple Actors, Levels, Scales and
Sectors
• Negotiatin...
Negotiating What and Whose
Landscape
• Recognize ecological as well as social, political,
historical, and cultural determi...
Balancing Power Dynamics
• Address power imbalances by pursuing
equity in representation and benefit
sharing through legal...
Resolving Governance Options
• Link knowledge systems through vertical
(hierarchical) and horizontal (sectoral)
coordinati...
Consensus Actions
• Develop innovation systems that foster
social learning about landscapes and
governance
• Invest in cri...
Consensus Actions (continued)
• Develop curricula, guidelines and codes of
conduct in landscape governance to promote
capa...
Springboards for Action
• Support ILIs already organized in Africa to
document experience, promote dialogue and
test innov...
Springboards for Action (continued)
• Incorporate landscape governance issues into
new CGIAR research programs in Africa a...
Further Springboards for Action
?
Photo: CIMMYT
Reference
• Kozar, R., L. Buck, E. Barrow, T. Sunderland, D.
Catacutan, C. Planicka, A. Hart, L. Willemen.
2014. “Towards ...
Today’s Process
• Introduction and Presentation (5, 10)
• Panel Discussion (25)
• Plenary Insights (15)
• Action Group For...
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Louise Buck - Supporting African Landscape Objectives Through Local Landscape Governance

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This presentation by Louise Buck introduced the major topics for the parallel session on African Landscape Governance at the Landscapes for People, Food and Nature in Africa Conference #LPFNinAfrica. (Photos in this presentation are courtesy of Neil Palmer, CIAT, Penn State, Tobias Nawrath Photography, CCAFS, Dana Hoag LCC CRSP and CIMMYT.)

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Louise Buck - Supporting African Landscape Objectives Through Local Landscape Governance

  1. 1. Supporting African Landscape Objectives Through Local Landscape Governance Louise Buck, EcoAgriculture Partners and Cornell University
  2. 2. Introduction As landscape approaches to pursuing food production, ecosystem service conservation and livelihood security in the same place gain favor, challenges in governing these complex systems arise. Photo: Neil Palmer, CIAT
  3. 3. Landscape Governance Concerned with the institutional arrangements, decision-making processes, policy instruments and underlying values by which multiple actors pursue their interests in production, conservation and livelihoods through multi- functional landscapes (Kozar, et al., 2014) Photo: Neil Palmer, CIAT
  4. 4. Landscape Governance Challenges • Multi-level, multi-actor governance inhibits integrated landscape management • Divergent values and interests makes decision- making complex • Diverse views about where to locate what functions, rights to resources, and ways of making and enforcing rules can lead to conflict • Power imbalances can lead to disempowerment of farmers and other local land users
  5. 5. Viable Landscape Governance Requires • Knowledge of existing institutional infrastructure and knowledge resources • Metrics for assessing multiple desired outcomes and trajectories for change • Interconnected systems to link action and social capital formation at different scales • Capacity to manage institutional complexity • Adaptive, collaborative management to learn Photo: Penn State
  6. 6. Diverse Models of Landscape Governance Emerging • LPFN review of 87 integrated landscape initiatives in 33 African countries reveals experimentation and innovation with multiple new forms and approaches • Fully realized forms are not common • Insight for designing viable systems evident from some documented experience
  7. 7. Landcare in South Africa • South African National Landcare Program, governed by Land Use and Soil Management Directorate within Department of Agriculture • Government-defined principles address governance that blends upper level policy processes with community feedback mechanisms • Main funding from government’s poverty relief program, designed to generate employment Photo Tobias Nawrath Photography
  8. 8. Landcare in Uganda • Governance occurs at participatory, grassroots level enabled through district government • Kapchorwa District Landcare Chapter operates as multi-stakeholder platform with shared vision • District government and community sector strive to ensure representation and ownership through CBOs, religious leaders, private sector, youth, disabled, women’s groups, etc. Photo: CCAFS
  9. 9. Northern Rangeland Trust in Kenya • Mission to develop resilient community conservancies focusses on community-led decision- making • Each conservancy has Board of Directors of democratically elected individuals and institutional members including donors • Highest governing body is Council of Elders responsible for policy and by-laws Photo: Dana Hoag, LCC CRSP
  10. 10. African Model Forest Network Platforms are established to help overcome weak links among forest management units and mitigate conflicts among forest actors through frameworks of “good governance” (ref: guide to MF governance). Model forests (MFs) are large, multi-functional landscapes governed by public-private-civic partnerships that engage local and indigenous communities.
  11. 11. Lessons for Putting into Practice Viable Systems that Account for Multiple Actors, Levels, Scales and Sectors • Negotiating what and whose landscape • Balancing power dynamics • Resolving governance options and metrics for evaluation Photo: CIMMYT
  12. 12. Negotiating What and Whose Landscape • Recognize ecological as well as social, political, historical, and cultural determinants of boundaries and scales • Invest in sustained leadership, and collaborative planning, adaptive management and decision- making to underpin dynamic governance systems that evolve over time with changes in socio-ecological systems
  13. 13. Balancing Power Dynamics • Address power imbalances by pursuing equity in representation and benefit sharing through legal frameworks and “good governance” processes • Design nested governance systems that span multiple levels, give local governments primary attention and build on customary arrangements Photo: CIMMYT
  14. 14. Resolving Governance Options • Link knowledge systems through vertical (hierarchical) and horizontal (sectoral) coordination frameworks and bridging organizations • Provide lasting incentives through legal land and resource rights, access to markets, others • Evaluate effects of policies on governance structures and processes to harmonize
  15. 15. Consensus Actions • Develop innovation systems that foster social learning about landscapes and governance • Invest in critical mass of agents with capacities for co-designing viable governance systems Photo: CIMMYT
  16. 16. Consensus Actions (continued) • Develop curricula, guidelines and codes of conduct in landscape governance to promote capacity development for landscape leaders. • Develop a Pan African Platform that brings together networks focused on forest, grazing, wildlife and agricultural production to enrich innovation in landscape governance and expand successful approaches.
  17. 17. Springboards for Action • Support ILIs already organized in Africa to document experience, promote dialogue and test innovations to further strengthen their governance systems. • Use existing platforms of landscape initiatives in Africa to accelerate and expand learning and innovation (through African Model Forest Network, Landcare International, AWF supported Heartlands, others) and interlink with the LPFN knowledge-sharing networks. Photo: CIMMYT
  18. 18. Springboards for Action (continued) • Incorporate landscape governance issues into new CGIAR research programs in Africa and link to operational landscape initiatives • Build a landscape governance focus into the expanding work of diverse partnerships and networks (eg; the NEPAD/TerrAfrica partnership, the African Landcare Network) • Others…?
  19. 19. Further Springboards for Action ? Photo: CIMMYT
  20. 20. Reference • Kozar, R., L. Buck, E. Barrow, T. Sunderland, D. Catacutan, C. Planicka, A. Hart, L. Willemen. 2014. “Towards Viable Landscape Governance Systems: What works?” Landscapes for People, Food and Nature Working Paper. EcoAgriculture Partners: Washington, DC.
  21. 21. Today’s Process • Introduction and Presentation (5, 10) • Panel Discussion (25) • Plenary Insights (15) • Action Group Formation (25) • Action Working Groups (60) • Report back to Session (30)

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