What is a Climate Smart
Agricultural Landscape?
Kwesi Atta-Krah,
Humidtropics,
International Institute of Tropical Agricul...
Climate Smart Agriculture
• Agriculture threatened by and contributes to
climate change
• CSA addresses adaptation to Clim...
• Landscape carrying mosaic of CSA
systems, in harmony with other
natural resources land
management options
– Natural and/...
Climate-Smart Landscapes
Systems Thinking: Prerequisites for Climate
Smart Agricultural Landscapes
Multi-component
interactions, trade-offs
Role of...
Integrated Landscape Management
Requires collaboration among different groups of land
managers and stakeholders to achieve...
Food-Secure Landscapes
• Farm and forest
landscapes can be
“designed” to produce
food year-round, while
providing habitat....
Sustainable Intensification
Sustainable Intensification:
• Ecological Intensification
• Genetic Intensification
• Socio-ec...
Agroecological Production Systems
that Produce Food & Ecosystem
Services
New Priorities for Crop Genetic
Improvement and Conservation
• New varieties adapted
to/mitigate climate change
• Domestic...
Natural Area Networks for Wildlife
Habitat and Watershed Protection
Who Needs to be Part of These
Multifunctional Landscapes?
• Communities that live in and rely upon the landscape
• Policy ...
Diverse Landscape Challenges
Require Locally-Adapted Solutions
More than 80 communities of practice
Uganda
• Integrated wa...
Photo: Piet Van Asten, IITA
A Systems Approach to Research
& Development
1. Systems / Landscape
mindset
2. A “multi” R&D T...
All photos by Neil Palmer, CIAT.
Thank you!!
A Smiling Future:
.. We can make it happen!!
Kwesi Atta-Krah - What is a Climate Smart Agricultural Landscape
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Kwesi Atta-Krah - What is a Climate Smart Agricultural Landscape

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Kwesi Atta-Krah of the CGIAR research program on the Humidtropics explains what is needed to transform every agricultural landscape in Africa into a climate-smart agricultural landscape, and the urgency of doing so. From the opening session of the Landscapes for People, Food and Nature in Africa Conference. (Photos in this presentation are courtesy of Neil Palmer, CIAT.)

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Kwesi Atta-Krah - What is a Climate Smart Agricultural Landscape

  1. 1. What is a Climate Smart Agricultural Landscape? Kwesi Atta-Krah, Humidtropics, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture
  2. 2. Climate Smart Agriculture • Agriculture threatened by and contributes to climate change • CSA addresses adaptation to Climate Change and also contributes towards mitigation. – Making agric productive and ecologically-friendly – Food and nutrition secure over time. • Avoids negative externalities – Environment – Natural resources (soil degradation) • Biodiversity and diversity rich
  3. 3. • Landscape carrying mosaic of CSA systems, in harmony with other natural resources land management options – Natural and/or human-modified ecosystems • Configuration of topography, vegetation, land use and settlements • Socio-ecological system : People and communities in center • Influenced by ecological, historical, economic and cultural process and activities of the area Neil Palmer, CIAT Climate Smart Agriculture Landscape?
  4. 4. Climate-Smart Landscapes
  5. 5. Systems Thinking: Prerequisites for Climate Smart Agricultural Landscapes Multi-component interactions, trade-offs Role of larger ecosystem health in agricultural sustainability & resilience Community engagement and Stakeholder Participation mechanisms and Processes - Gender relations A system: interaction between a farming system and livelihoods system, within a defined agroecological space Neil Palmer, CIAT
  6. 6. Integrated Landscape Management Requires collaboration among different groups of land managers and stakeholders to achieve the multiple objectives required from the landscape. Neil Palmer, CIAT Agricultural production, provision of ecosystem services, protection of biodiversity, beauty, identity, recreational value, local livelihoods, human health, well- being - Kabale, Uganda example
  7. 7. Food-Secure Landscapes • Farm and forest landscapes can be “designed” to produce food year-round, while providing habitat. • Agroforestry Systems – Trees on farm – Tree plots within agricultural landscapes • Proper management of wild populations in forest and uncultivated landscapes: – deer, agouti, raccoon, & other traditional sources of animal protein • Wild plant and fruit foraging Ecoagriculture protects wild species and conserve habitat while increasing agricultural production and farmer incomes
  8. 8. Sustainable Intensification Sustainable Intensification: • Ecological Intensification • Genetic Intensification • Socio-economic Intensification Sustainable Diversification • Crop species diversity • Wild species diversity • Habitat diversity • Landscape diversity Increasing world food production for growing population cannot be done by clearing more forest land ….. Principles
  9. 9. Agroecological Production Systems that Produce Food & Ecosystem Services
  10. 10. New Priorities for Crop Genetic Improvement and Conservation • New varieties adapted to/mitigate climate change • Domesticate wild species • Improvement and promotion of Minor crops • Increase resilience • Reduce input requirements • Reduce GHG emissions Photo: © IFAD
  11. 11. Natural Area Networks for Wildlife Habitat and Watershed Protection
  12. 12. Who Needs to be Part of These Multifunctional Landscapes? • Communities that live in and rely upon the landscape • Policy makers at national, regional and local levels • Organizations championing integrated landscapes • Climate change research programs, such as CCAFS • Systems Research programs, such as Humidtropics Neil Palmer, CIAT
  13. 13. Diverse Landscape Challenges Require Locally-Adapted Solutions More than 80 communities of practice Uganda • Integrated watershed management • Greening agricultural corridors • Territorial development • Model forests Niger Kenya • Biological corridors • Landscape restoration • Eco-regional programs • Others…
  14. 14. Photo: Piet Van Asten, IITA A Systems Approach to Research & Development 1. Systems / Landscape mindset 2. A “multi” R&D Team 3. Stakeholder engagement 4. Systems improvement 5. Institutional Inovation: hard-, soft- and ‘orgware 6. Scale dimension: 7. Gender research: 8. Capacity building 9. Development orientation 10. Learning
  15. 15. All photos by Neil Palmer, CIAT. Thank you!! A Smiling Future: .. We can make it happen!!

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