ECOLOGICAL LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE             COURTNEY A BAILEY; MLA             Courtney A Bailey; MLA, BMS, BSS         ...
2011 Landscape Ecology                                                                                                    ...
2011 Master’s Design Thesis -       The bio(diversity)City - People +City +Wildlife                          BioDiversity-...
Plan view of project                                                               Plan diagram for project               ...
Riparian Conditions Pre 1800                                         80 percent of Arizona Wildlife lives in this riparian...
The Difference Between Reality and Theory Biodiversity Capability                                                         ...
1930                                                          90 percent loss of functional riparian habitat              ...
Bailey Portfolio
Bailey Portfolio
Bailey Portfolio
Bailey Portfolio
Bailey Portfolio
Bailey Portfolio
Bailey Portfolio
Bailey Portfolio
Bailey Portfolio
Bailey Portfolio
Bailey Portfolio
Bailey Portfolio
Bailey Portfolio
Bailey Portfolio
Bailey Portfolio
Bailey Portfolio
Bailey Portfolio
Bailey Portfolio
Bailey Portfolio
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Bailey Portfolio

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Courtney Bailey Portfolio 2012

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Bailey Portfolio

  1. 1. ECOLOGICAL LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE COURTNEY A BAILEY; MLA Courtney A Bailey; MLA, BMS, BSS LandArchitect.Bailey@gmail.com www.TwistOfUnique.com
  2. 2. 2011 Landscape Ecology 2009 ASU Tempe Campus Masters Thesis: University Rainwater Havesting and gardens The Bio(diversity)City - People +City +Wildlife 03 Concept Diagrams 22 Analysis -Urban Stormwater 05 Research as a story 23 Analysis -client use and movement 06 Wildlife ecology research 08 Phenology for wildlife Masters Research Baseline 10 Riparian Analysis - Soil & Plant and wildlife Other research projects See Wood Arbor Plan for dimensions 11 Design Sections 24 Rainwater Harvesting Sections 25 Autocad Construction Documents Residential Courtyard Designs See Deck Plan for layout and step dimension 26 Analysis - H-VAC Biofiltration systems & Phx 0” - Courtyard Zen Garden 20” 1 inch = 40 feet Baseline - Backyard Residential 40” quarters” call out # 24 POB- North east corner of ‘Sleep 15 Two plan views 80” 16 Plant book/ Plant pallette Designed by: Courtney A Bailey Drawn by: Courtney A Bailey CANELO PROJECT D1 6 of 18 Checked by: Layout/ Dimension Plans 18 DESIGN PHASE Hand renderingsDesignPhilosophy [Concept Development] Designing for experience: human centered design- This style of space making focuses on the creation of ‘moments of engagement’ or opportunities for the dynamics of life and emotions to occur. This is done by placing design emphasis on people; designing with culturally relevant solutions and with the quality of audience experience at the forefront of the design. Human centered design emphasizes the 02 experience of the visitor instead of designing places of functionality and efficiency.
  3. 3. 2011 Master’s Design Thesis - The bio(diversity)City - People +City +Wildlife BioDiversity- The Biocity intends to increase habitat diversity –for both wildlife and people by designing a biologically diverse land area where there protecting urban waterways are several species, and human activities with an equal distribution. This is done so that no one plant or animal species, nor human socio-economic activity uncharacteristically dominates above all others.Location- Pinal County, Casa Grande Arizona Proximity- As wildlife biodiversity diminishes, if wildlife is to be pro- tected, its habitat must be integrated into locations where people can see it,Activist Agency- people can interact with it, and people can become familiar with wildlife and itsPinal County Open Space Initiative habitat can enrich their lives.Working with the Concepts- Experience - There is no greater teacher then personal experience. If *Living and Building with Wildlife natural places are to be preserved then it is imperative that people are able to*Urban Ecology -Riparian in the city walk among the trees, touch the earth, listen to he birds and find kinship with*Increasing Urban Wildlife biological diversity other living things. For an individual can ever understand what loss is, until*Providing social-cultural needs for citizens they have experienced what they are loosing.*Public Buildings in order to protect wildlands*Ecological Research -Wildlife Corridors Education - The only way the ‘natural look’ is going to be accepted by*Research - Riparian Geomorphology the public, who see it as messy, is through education. The site incorporates*Research -Sonoran Desert Wildlife signs, banners, and plant plaques to make information available to the public. So that they too can realize that nature and natural are designs too.Project Statment:Right now, we are living in ‘The sixth Great A BioDiversity Nightmare:Mass Extinction’ of Earth’s history. Globally, If we dont start now there will be a sunrise, one morning, where there A Home all Alone?scientists predict that by the end of this are no songbirds to greet the dawn. There be will an afternoon, whencentury, half of this planet’s wild-species will there are no butterflies dancing upon the winds. There will come abe extinct. The culprit is human habitat midnight with a moon full in the sky, but there will be no coyote songs.development; as our cities sprawl outward, There will be questions too; young eyes will look towards us, thethe wildlands next to our homes have stewards of their land. What do we say when our children turn to usdecreased in acreage. This project explores and ask, “Why are we so alone? Where did all the butterflies go?”a solution -the idea that human developmentcan exist intermingled with the wildlife Will our answer be, “We forgot to build them homes too?”ecosystems and both can blend together tobecome a bio city.Full project: www.TwistOfUnique.com [Concept Diagrams ] With public-works it’s important to explain the concept03 Thesis|Landscape Ecology with simple visuals and non-technical terms. So Citizens understand why this project is important to them.
  4. 4. Plan view of project Plan diagram for project Thesis|Landscape Ecology [Development Plan] The plan diagrams for this project include documentation for both Citizens and wildlife. Labeling the plan diagram was done this way to reveal the complexity of the site in a visual manor. This makes it easier for the client to see what is going on for people and then for wildlife and where they overlap. |Plan View 04
  5. 5. Riparian Conditions Pre 1800 80 percent of Arizona Wildlife lives in this riparian habitat Dominant Water Use: homestead with small farms 90 percent loss of functional riparian habitat Conditions of River water: perennial river Channel condition: Semi-natural riparian condition, perennial river condition. Vegetation condition: Water Cottonwood Willow Mesquite Bosque Desert-Scrub Riparian Conditions 1880- 1912 Dominant Water Use: Large agriculture farms - Tucson industrialization (1880) removes water Conditions of River water:1900 - perennial rivers where the water no longer flowed. Channel condition: Channelized to the unconfined aquifer Vegetation condition: Mesquite Bosque Desert-Scrub Cottonwood Willow Water Riparian Conditions 1912 -1940 Dominant Water Use: Industrial farms, Pinal County Growth Conditions of River water: No surface water- water levels at 20’-30’ below the surface in confined aquifer Channel condition: Widening channels due to increased stormwater flows Vegetation condition: Desert-Scrub Mesquite Bosque Cottonwood Willow Dominant Water Use: Industrial farms, Pinal Riparian Conditions 1960 -2010 County Growth Conditions of River water: No surface water- water levels at 30’- 50’ below the surface in artesian aquifer Channel condition: Widened, eroded, 90% loss of habitat space Vegetation condition: Desert-Scrub Mesquite Bosque Cottonwood Willow05 Research| [Developing a story] Research is for stories! With visuals a compelling tale unfolds; one allows a viewer to easily understand the concept and enables them to reach insightful conclusions.
  6. 6. The Difference Between Reality and Theory Biodiversity Capability Displaces 23 of Pinal’s 27 speices listed “in need of protection ” Wildlife present in Waterway Type Wildlife NOT present in Waterway Type Thesis|Landscape Ecology 90 percent loss of functional riparian C Rivers D Rivers C Rivers D Rivers C Rivers D Rivers C Rivers D Rivers * * * * Amphibian (frog) Reality Space mapping Wildlife Capacity C Rivers: Amphibian (Toad) 16 of 19 Wildlife Taxa Reptile –Lizard Wildlife Capacity D Rivers: Reptile– Snake 9 of 19 Wildlife Taxa Turtles Carnivores Reality Water loss Rodents Riparian Wildlife Orders Wildlife Capacity C Rivers: Rabbits 10 of 19 Wildlife Taxa Common Birds Wildlife Capacity D Rivers: Owls 2 of 19 Wildlife Taxa Waterbirds Reality Plant zone loss Humming Birds Wildlife Capacity C Rivers: Ducks 7 of 19Wildlife Taxa Ground birds Wildlife Capacity D Rivers: Woodpeckers 6 of 19 Wildlife Taxa Hawk / Eagle Hooved mammals Bats Beavers Th eo Re Re Re r et al al al ica ity ity ity lB :L :L :L io os os os d s s ive s of of of rs pl W Sp ity an at ac Ca er ts e pa bi lity[Ecological Site analysis] Thesis research on Riparian habitat and how biodiversity of wildlifespecies is effected by river geomorphology, water access, land access, proper planting zones and species. |Research 06
  7. 7. 1930 90 percent loss of functional riparian habitat as we break up the landscape into a thousand tiny bits 1950 Fragmentation Edge habitat 1970 Interior habitat Looking at land fragmentation In the broadest way, habitat fragmentation is the physical fracturing of once continuous habitat, often by man-made modifications to the biological land surface 1990 (including water, vegetation, bare soil) into smaller sized habitat lands called patches. For wildlife these patches are often so small that the land can no longer sustain the ecological interactions between different wildlife types, thus this land often has little value for wildlife as habitat. In addition, fragmentation of land into patches means that as interior space becomes smaller in size, edge conditions are able to take over; this reduces the populations of rare interior species and makes room for common generalist and ‘weedy species’. 2012 As Interior habitat and species Decreases Edge habitat and species Increases Santa Cruze River 1930 Santa Cruze River 1970 Research| Urban growth07 Agriculture growth [Fragmentation Analysis] An urban history - How housing development, roadways, and land Santa Cruze River fragmentation has caused wildlife habitat loss.

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