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School Finance Budget Analysis and Development Project

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The mission of Wade High School is to prepare students for the future by providing a rigorous and relevant instruction for students at all academic levels to ensure each has the opportunity to achieve maximum potential

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School Finance Budget Analysis and Development Project

  1. 1. Running head: BUDGET DEVELOPMENT PROJECT Budget Analysis and Development Project Teisha Goudeau, Justin Mack, and LaKeisha Weber Xavier University of Louisiana In partial fulfillment of the requirements for EDAD 5570 Management of School Personnel and Finance Dr. Esrom Pitre December 1, 2015
  2. 2. BUDGET DEVELOPMENT PROJECT 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS SCHOOL MISSION AND VISION................................................................................... 3 PROPOSAL OVERVIEW.................................................................................................. 4 DISTRICT AND CAMPUS SNAPSHOT.......................................................................... 4 COMPREHENSIVE NEEDS ASSESSMENT................................................................... 6 ADDRESSING THE NEED............................................................................................... 7 REFERENCES ................................................................................................................. 11 APPENDIX A …………………………………………………………………………...12 APPENDIX B ................................................................................................................... 13 APPENDIX C ................................................................................................................... 14 APPENDIX D................................................................................................................... 15 APPENDIX E ................................................................................................................... 16 APPENDIX F.................................................................................................................... 17 APPENDIX G................................................................................................................... 18
  3. 3. BUDGET DEVELOPMENT PROJECT 3 School Mission The mission of Wade High School is to prepare students for the future by providing a rigorous and relevant instruction for students at all academic levels to ensure each has the opportunity to achieve maximum potential. School Vision Wade High School will provide students with highest quality college readiness education in a secure, progressive, and positive environment through rigorous teaching, learning, and student engagement practices. As a result, our students will become globally competitive and excel in all post-secondary endeavors. Proposal Overview As a newly appointed school principal, my team and I have to make major budgetary decisions that will support and ultimately uphold the integrity of our school’s mission and vision. In order to spearhead these upcoming changes, it was necessary that we identify the needs of our school, analyze current and past state/district budgets, and employ research-based strategies to improve our education program. This proposal will illustrate our needs as well as our plans to allocate funding to ensure positive school achievement. District and Campus Snapshot According to the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), the Bryant Public School District has a student body that resembles many large, urban cities; a great percentage of minority students who receive free/reduced lunch. The census data gained from the NCES indicates that in 2013-2014 Bryant Public Schools educates a population of 12,447 students across 21 schools. The student population is a sample that reflects the overall demographics of the area. According to 2010 state census data, the Bryant Parish Schools District services an area
  4. 4. BUDGET DEVELOPMENT PROJECT 4 that is 60 % African American, 33% White, 2.9% Asian, 0.3% American Indian/Alaska Native, 0% Hawaii/Pacific Islander, and 1.9% other race. This school district was once one of the largest in the state, but due to recent educational reform it has lost many of its schools. The most recent data states that the school district employs approximately 804 classroom teachers. The data from the NCES indicates an overall 15:1 teacher to student ratio which is ideal for most teachers in the state. The district supplies 11.2% of its student body with special education services and employs 147 instructional aides to maximize educational time. The district received a total of $383,222,000 from federal, state, and local funding sources. The amount each school received per student was $35,219, which is funded almost solely by local revenue sources. The district requires $243,529,000 to provide its schools with the fundamental necessities (instructional, student/staff, administrative, operations, and food service expenditures) for fluid operation. Strategic budget allocations combined with the district’s focus on obtaining funding from community and business organizations contributes to its larger-than-most per student capital. Wade Charter High School is a 9-12th gradedistrict-run charter school. Wade is very unique school with deep ties to the community as well as many of the city’s successful African American leaders. Having a total of 990 students, Wade is large school relative to other schools in the district. The student body consists of; 956 (96.6%) African Americans, 2 (0.2%) Whites, 26 (2.63%) Hispanics, 1 (0.1%) Native American, 1 (0.1%) Asian, and 4 (0.4%) other races (see Appendix A). Of the school’s 990 students, 81% of them qualify for free/reduced lunch, illustrating that the majority of students attending Wade Charter High School are economically disadvantaged (ED). Therefore, our school is a qualified recipient of Title I funding. Despite the
  5. 5. BUDGET DEVELOPMENT PROJECT 5 large number of ED students, Wade has a very small population of students that require special education services (10%). Currently, Wade Charter High School is classified as an “A” school as indicated by receiving a school performance score (SPS) of 109.2 for the 2014-2015 school year. This is an increase of 13 points from the SPS score earned during the 2013-2014 school year (96.2/B). With the exception of the 2013-2014 school year, Wade Charter has experienced continued growth & profession over the last five years increasing their SPS score each year. Serving such a large urban population of students whom are largely economically disadvantaged requires continuous hard work by teachers, administrators, parents, and the community to ensure we’re meeting the needs of all students at Wade Charter High School and ensuring the SPS scores maintains a positive slope despite a recent decline. Rating student performance on the ACT is based on students achieving a minimum score of 18. Approximately 70% of Wade Charter students received a minimum of 18 on the ACT score showing an increase the 2013-2014 school year. This score was 1% (71%) lower than the district average and 8% higher than the state average (62%). The average earned ACT score by Wade Charter High School students was 18.8 which fell below the district average of 20.8, state average of 19.2, and national average of 19.7. Students earning college and career credit is based on student performance on advance placement exams (3+) and students earning dual enrollment credit. Less than 5% of students at Wade High scored 3+ on advance placement testing which was identical to the 2013-2014 school year. However, this was far below the district average of 20%, while closer to the state average of 5.3%. Approximately 54% of graduating students earned dual enrollment credit showing an
  6. 6. BUDGET DEVELOPMENT PROJECT 6 increase over the 2013-2014 school year and 33% higher than the state (21%) and 26% higher than the state average (28%). Finally, in relation to graduation rates, college enrollment, and assisting academically struggling students, 95% of Wade students graduated in four years representing an improvement for the 2014-2015 school year. Wade’s graduation rate exceeded the district by 6% points (89%) and exceeded the state average of 75%. Following graduation 73% of Wade Charter students enrolled in college while the district average was 72%. This was well above the state average of 59%. In the area of making progress with students struggling academically, Wade earned 7.1 points resulting in an increase from the 2013-2014 school year. The overall performance in these various areas of student achievement are what collectively resulted in an increased SPS score of 109.2. This score designates Wade Charter as an A school within the state of Louisiana. Despite numerous positive gains, Wade has seen a decrease in the performance scores of students with disabilities. That fact may be an indication that small group instruction in combination with other interventions/strategies is needed for more effective instructional outcomes. It is imperative that we identify and address the needs of all students, particularly those struggling with high-stakes assessment or the school’s SPS will cease to show continuous improvement. Comprehensive Needs Assessment After careful analysis of student performance data, the academic needs of the students were isolated. First, my team and I analyzed school and state assessment data and listed the key student academic strengths (see Appendix A). The table hones in on the academic success of 9th Algebra I students, the 10th grade African American ED subgroup (English II, Geometry, and Biology assessments), 11th grade English II students, and 12th grade ACT testers. Using the same
  7. 7. BUDGET DEVELOPMENT PROJECT 7 data we determined the top six academic needs/weaknesses of the students which are also displayed in Appendix A. While the EOC assessment data disclosed that students were capable of achieving remarkable overall scores, a closer look exposed key areas of weaknesses. Students with 504 accommodations, as wells as the African American ED subgroup, struggled on the reading & research portion of the EOC English II/III. African American ED students did not fare well on the life/earth science section of the EOC biology test. That was also the case on the numbers/statistics/functions portion of the Algebra I EOC assessment. Of the small population of Hispanic students only 42% are capable of scoring a good or above on the expression of geometric properties portion of the Geometry EOC test. Lastly, 9th grade students achieved an average score of 13 on the science section of the ACT. This is significant because the school’s SPS scores is calculated based on a combination of factors that includes 11th grade average ACT scores. Addressing the Need As a result of the needs assessment analysis, we set a school-wide goal to increase high- stakes testing scores (ACT and EOC) for students across all grade levels and curriculum by 0.5+ (see Appendix B). An increase in these scores will keep the school aligned with the vision of creating students that are college ready. To achieve this task, it was obligatory for us to determine what school practices, strategies, and/or reforms are capable of helping us meet our objectives while upholding the mission and vision of our school. After an immense amount of research and staff input, six school-wide reform strategies were selected to helps us achieve our goals; (1) job-embedded professional development, (2) meaningful learning, assessment & engagement for all students, (3) data-driven instructional strategies, (4) recruitment and retention of highly-qualified teachers, (5) response to intervention, and (6) parental involvement and
  8. 8. BUDGET DEVELOPMENT PROJECT 8 support (see Appendix B). Appendices C-H detail our comprehensive plan which includes staff responsibility, funding sources, cost, research-based strategies, and the reform strategy supported. Aiming to increasing high-stakes, standardized testing scores can be overwhelming for many staff members. It is vital for teachers to be included when decisions are made regarding assessment data and procedures. Teachers are oftentimes subjected to professional development meetings are not aligned with student needs (Ruddy and Prusinski, 2012) which is counterproductive to student success. With the proper training that provides teachers with tools to improve instruction students will likely receive high-quality instruction and positive assessment gains. According to Saad (2012), teachers are more committed and feel appreciated when they are being included in discussions about their school. Illustrated in Appendix C are the strategies we will use to educate teachers on effective methods to help close our achievement gap. Title I and II fund allocations permit the hiring of math, technology, and ELA instructional coaches. Teachers across curriculum will attend content-specific educational conferences throughout the school year in addition to the 16 mandatory on-site meetings. Achieving our goal of increasing student scores by 0.5+ closes the achievement gap between our students and their peers district and statewide. It is necessary to improve the performance of lower achieving students through research-based strategies and interventions. Listed in Appendix D is our reform plan that focuses specifically on utilizing interventionists, para-educators, and technology programs to meet the needs struggling students. The use of Title I and district funding will finance these programs and initiatives. The mission of every school leader should be to hire and retain highly qualified teachers. Teacher quality can have a profound effect on the goals and objectives of any educational
  9. 9. BUDGET DEVELOPMENT PROJECT 9 program. Researchers, politicians, and other scholars have supported the notion that highly qualified teachers play a pivotal role in reforming educational practices, but fail to remain in the classroom (Keigher, 2010). Our plan for recruiting and retaining highly qualified educators in our school is detailed in Appendix E. Providing in-classroom supports and meaningful professional development opportunities in the key to teacher retention and student success. A detailed outline of the actions we will take to meet the needs of our students can be found in Appendices B-G.
  10. 10. BUDGET DEVELOPMENT PROJECT 10 References Bryant Public School District Census Data. (2014, January 1). Retrieved November 10, 2015, from http://nces.ed.gov Hodges, G. W., Tippins, D., & Oliver, J. S. (2013). A study of highly qualified science teachers' career trajectory in the deep, rural south: Examining a link between deprofessionalization and teacher dissatisfaction. School Science and Mathematics, 113(6), 263-274. Keigher, A. (2010). Teacher attrition and mobility: Results from the 2008-09 Teacher Follow-up Survey (NCES 2010-353). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved 11/15/2015 from http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch. Louisiana Census Data. (2010, January 15). Retrieved November 22, 2015, from http://www.census.gov/ Ruddy, A., & Prusinski, E. (2012). Professional Development for School Improvement: The Case of Indiana. Journal of School Leadership, 22(1), 55-78. Saad, N. (2012). The effects of teachers’ participation in decision making on commitment. The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Social Sciences, 6(9), 1-15.

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