Resource Sharing
Detective Work
Free and Open Access Tools to Help Us
Find it NOW!
Russell Palmer
russell.palmer@lyrasis.o...
Doing the detective work
• Periodicals
• Government Information
• Archival collections/primary documents
• Other challenge...
Periodicals
• Open Access tools
• Google Scholar
• Google Magazines
• What do you use?
Newspapers
• Chronicling America
• http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/
Government Information

• Technical Reports:
– Virtual Technical Reports Center (UMD)
– http://lib.guides.umd.edu/content....
Archival materials
• Approach:
• Local/State Archives/University Archives
• What’s out there?
• OCLC ArchiveGrid
• http://...
Examples
• Digital Public Library of America
• dp.la
• American Memory Project
• http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/index.html
• ...
Ask an author?
• LinkedIn
• Academia.edu
• CV online
• Standard social media tools—twitter,
facebook, etc.
Discussion
• Share a “got it!” story-where you found
something interesting for a patron that was
extremely challenging!
• ...
Why Open Access?
• $$$
• Control—access
• Copyright—tightly managed by publishers
• WWW/New media
• Speed of sharing
New p...
Open Access defined
• Digital/Online
• Free of charge*
• Free of most copyright/licensing restrictions
• Access to literat...
Categories of Open Access
• Gold OA—hosted by a publisher with no barriers to
access
– Example: PLoS Biology
http://www.pl...
Categories
• Hybrid Open Access Journal—some articles are free,
because a publication fee was paid (usually by the author)...
Another Categorization
“Nine Flavours of Open Access”

Willinsky, 2003
Selected
Open Access resources
• For reference and research
• For finding alternative resources
• Titles in the Library/In...
The institutional repository
• SMARTech at Georgia Tech
– https://smartech.gatech.edu/

• GALILEO Knowledge Repository
– h...
Thank You for Attending!
Questions/Comments?
russell.palmer@lyrasis.org
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Rs detective 2nd_fri

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  • Open access has drawn more attention in a down economy. The way traditional publishers tightly control the works of authors becomes less desirable and limits the dissemination of scholarly information the www facilitates the easy exchange of information, and new media offers, in some ways, (blogs, twitter, social bookmarking, particularly cite u like--etc) a new and easy means of indexing and abstracting, in a way Limits on dissemination of trad published material OA journals may charge publishing fees Several universities have developed open access policies
  • In 2002, the Budapest Open Access Initiative defined open access as the "world-wide electronic distribution of the peer-reviewed journal literature, completely free and unrestricted access to it by all scientists, scholars, teachers, students, and other curious minds." Obviously such publishing, like all publishing, has a cost. As such, someone other than the reader (or the reader's library) would pay for the publication-and much of the discussion so far has been how that cost might be paid for. (http://www.library.cornell.edu/scholarlycomm/openaccess/) Price & permission barriers: “OA removes some permission barriers (e.g. on copying, redistribution, and printing) even if it leaves different OA providers free to adopt different policies on others (e.g. on derivative works and commercial re-use)” http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/newsletter/09-02-04.htm#progress Commonalities among 3Bs: “The important things to note in the basic definition are that open access deals with peer-reviewed articles or preprints and that free access to these works is not equivalent to open access. Open access also requires no restrictions on how published material is subsequently used except to require that proper attribution of the work be given to the author and that authors retain control over the integrity of their work.” (http://www.library.cornell.edu/scholarlycomm/openaccess/) Cornell, for ArXiv, last year began asking for support from 200 heaviest users (institutional)– in 2009 30 million articles had been downloaded.
  • Different ways to categorize Green OA – NIH rules on availability of federally-funded studies, though embargo periods may still exist Stevan Harnad generally credited for the colors; gray, yellow, blue also referenced Highwire Press also green
  • [take a break after this]
  • DEMO: PLOS—OAI/OCLC—Open Doar—DOAJ—PubMed Central--http://ucblibraries.colorado.edu/dean/peer_reviewed.htm--http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/ FOR ILL EVENT: DOAJ DOAB PLOS National Academies Press
  • Rs detective 2nd_fri

    1. 1. Resource Sharing Detective Work Free and Open Access Tools to Help Us Find it NOW! Russell Palmer russell.palmer@lyrasis.org LYRASIS ©2013
    2. 2. Doing the detective work • Periodicals • Government Information • Archival collections/primary documents • Other challenges/discussion/idea exchange
    3. 3. Periodicals • Open Access tools • Google Scholar • Google Magazines • What do you use?
    4. 4. Newspapers • Chronicling America • http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/
    5. 5. Government Information • Technical Reports: – Virtual Technical Reports Center (UMD) – http://lib.guides.umd.edu/content.php?pid=317991&sid=27 • Fun and Interesting: – The Government Attic – http://governmentattic.org/ – UNT Cyber Cemetery – http://govinfo.library.unt.edu/default.htm
    6. 6. Archival materials • Approach: • Local/State Archives/University Archives • What’s out there? • OCLC ArchiveGrid • http://archivegrid.org/web/index.jsp
    7. 7. Examples • Digital Public Library of America • dp.la • American Memory Project • http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/index.html • UNC Chapel Hill, “Documenting the American South” • http://docsouth.unc.edu/ • Florida Memory • http://www.floridamemory.com/
    8. 8. Ask an author? • LinkedIn • Academia.edu • CV online • Standard social media tools—twitter, facebook, etc.
    9. 9. Discussion • Share a “got it!” story-where you found something interesting for a patron that was extremely challenging! • What was it? • Where did you find it? • How did you get it?
    10. 10. Why Open Access? • $$$ • Control—access • Copyright—tightly managed by publishers • WWW/New media • Speed of sharing New publishing models emerged.
    11. 11. Open Access defined • Digital/Online • Free of charge* • Free of most copyright/licensing restrictions • Access to literature and articles traditionally published in scholarly journals • Open access refers only to free and unrestricted availability without any further implications
    12. 12. Categories of Open Access • Gold OA—hosted by a publisher with no barriers to access – Example: PLoS Biology http://www.plosbiology.org/home.action • Green OA—materials deposited for archiving/access that may have once been in a traditional publication – Example: PubMed Central http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/
    13. 13. Categories • Hybrid Open Access Journal—some articles are free, because a publication fee was paid (usually by the author) to the publisher – Example: Publishers offering a hybrid option—American Chemical Society, Wiley, Cambridge, Sage • Delayed Open Access Journal—traditional journals that provide free or open access after an embargo period – Example: Journal of Experimental Biology http://jeb.biologists.org/
    14. 14. Another Categorization “Nine Flavours of Open Access” Willinsky, 2003
    15. 15. Selected Open Access resources • For reference and research • For finding alternative resources • Titles in the Library/Information Science realm • Publishing in open access journals
    16. 16. The institutional repository • SMARTech at Georgia Tech – https://smartech.gatech.edu/ • GALILEO Knowledge Repository – http://www.library.gatech.edu/gkr/about
    17. 17. Thank You for Attending! Questions/Comments? russell.palmer@lyrasis.org

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