Jobsearch masterclass presentation mid 2013

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Slides from the Jobsearch Masterclass held at La Trobe University on 18 July 2013. Topics covered include researching job opportunities, resume writing, interviews, psychometric testing, networking

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  • Jason
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  • JasonLimit of 50 linked in photos – first come basisBookings were required for afternoon sessions – if you have not booked and would like to attend please go to the room and see if places are available.
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  • DeniseMost graduate programs require completion of your degree within the previous two years to be eligible.Some organisations accept postgraduate students – check with the organisation you are interested in to check before applying.
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  • DeniseGraduate programsStructured professional development programs lasting 1-2 years in large organisations specifically for new graduatesMany applications must be submitted a year in advance, whilst some are ongoing Only one option!Graduate positionsFormal full time positions offered by organisations of all sizes to students who are about to / have recently completed their studiesAdvertised on job boards (seek, careerhub) , by professional associations or just on company websiteEntry level opportunitiesGet a ‘foot in the door’ in an organisation that provides further opportunities for training and development and work your way upE.g. Unit pricing to graduate accountant– Michael GCareers admin to social researcher – Michael L
  • DeniseMost graduate selection processes are very similar or are variations on the above. The exact order may change depending upon the organisation, however most graduate programs will include the above steps as part of the selection process.The selection process may also include:Case studiesWritten exercises / testsInitial screeningCover letterrésuméStatement addressing the selection criteriaApplication formPsychometric testingAptitudePersonalityFurther interviewsTelephone interviewGroup interviewBehavioural interviewFace-to-face interviewPanel interviewBehavioural event interviewingProbity checkingChecks about any criminal history and bankruptcy details. Helps to ensure that you have the right qualifications for the role, and identifies any possible issues that may prevent you from performing that role.** Mention other workshops focusing on psychometric testing, assessment centres, interviewing and resumes and cover letters **
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  • DeniseUseful sources of information whilst looking for graduate jobs:La Trobe Graduate Networking EventLa Trobe Career Development CentreLa Trobe Careers websiteCareerHub job databaseLa Trobe Essential Careers GuideEmployer events on campusEmployer websitesEmployer brochuresPeople in the industryGraduate Opportunities – website and guidesUniGrad – website and guideGradCareersGrad ConnectionFamily and friendsNewspapers (MyCareer in The Age on Saturdays)
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  • Geoffrey1. Discuss thinking behind creating / presenting a resume (Geoffrey) Analysing your unique combination of skills and experienceCollating evidence and marketing this in a resume format – marketing proposal Content is more important than style2. Tips for improving your resume:Career objectiveAchievements focusedSkills statements get results3. Examples in workbook – refer to these
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  • GeoffreyWhat was the problem, what was your action to remedy it, and what was the result?
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  • GeoffreyIn addition to the online form, your job application will usually require a:RésuméReference listStatement addressing the selection criteria (for some organisations)Academic transcripts (for some organisations)Source: Graduate Opportunities
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  • GeoffreyAllow 1-2 hours per application.Make sure that your email address if correct, professional and reliable as this is the primary method of contact.Look at the company website to see if it includes information about applying for graduate programs and read it!Attach all documents as requested and ensure you have attached them in the correct format.
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  • JasonA recent survey commissioned by Microsoft found that 70 percent of recruiters and hiring managers in the United States have rejected an applicant based on information they found online.What kind of information? "Inappropriate" comments by the candidate; "unsuitable" photos and videos; criticisms of previous employers, co-workers, or clients; and even inappropriate comments by friends and relatives, according to the survey report, titled "Online Reputation in a Connected World.““For people new to a field, companies just don’t have a lot to look back on,” Murphy said. “They can’t call up your former boss. They look you up on Facebook.”
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  • DenisePreparing for Expos means that you will get more out of it.Researching employers attendingView employers attending online – details of employers attending the Expo will be available on Careers website closer to the date. Information will also include the disciplines and qualifications sought by employers, and important eligibility criteria.QuestionsTake advantage of meeting employers by asking questions to help you clarify information about job opportunities.Avoid asking questions for which answers can be easily obtained via websites or flyers.Listen to what other students are asking employers in addition to the questions you ask.Questions might include:Projects graduates work on during rotationsTraining and development opportunitiesKeep a record of who you spoke to at career events and the outcome of applications to help you stay on top of the application processCollect useful published materials – those that will be helpful when submitting applications – rather than just the showbags!AppearanceWearing a suit is not necessary. Smart casual is the minimum.Make a positive impression
  • DeniseCreate your ‘Elevator Pitch’ – a thirty second personal statement. It is a short personal branding/marketing statement about yourself, and the basis for building a professional networking relationship. You can use it to introduce yourself when attending networking events, in emails, over the phone, and on any occasion where you want someone to quickly understand your background and your interests.It can include details about your:qualification/s and experience work competencies and personal qualities interest in the position, the organisation and industry current situation and availability to commence work
  • DeniseCreate your ‘Elevator Pitch’ – a thirty second personal statement. It is a short personal branding/marketing statement about yourself, and the basis for building a professional networking relationship. You can use it to introduce yourself when attending networking events, in emails, over the phone, and on any occasion where you want someone to quickly understand your background and your interests.It can include details about your:qualification/s and experience work competencies and personal qualities interest in the position, the organisation and industry current situation and availability to commence work
  • DeniseACTIVITY: (If time) – practise your elevator pitch with the person next to you.Was it hard / easy?Now (or at home) refine it and practice again in front of the group / the mirror!
  • DeniseIf timeHand out business cards
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  • DeniseFollow UpRe-contact people you spoke with at the Expo, thanking them for their time and asking for any additional advice they can offer you. When you come to apply, you can also mention or thank that person in your cover letter. Lateral ThinkingBroaden your research to include recruiters who didn't attend the Expo. 
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  • CarlyConsider the interview from the employers perspective – what would you want to know about the candidates – e.Probably know that you can do the job by the interview stage – but not the will you & will you fit in?
  • CarlyPhone interviewMany large employers will use a phone screening interview to select candidates for a formal interview to be held in person. The phone interview may be focussed on obtaining more details about your experiences and skills. Or it could involve a number of behavioural-based questions.If you are given a time for your phone interview, make sure you are able to be in a quiet space, free of disruptions. Some good tips for phone interviews include standing during the interview, as this will make it easier to speak clearly (like you would giving a presentation to an audience); have your resume and other documents with you for easy reference; have a notepad and pen to record any important information.Should be scheduled by recruiter
  • CarlyTips from careerfaqs.com.au Be preparedMake sure you do your research just as you would for any other job interview. Find out as much as you can about the company and think about possible answers to interview questions. Practise going through your answers, preferably with another person. One of the benefits of doing an interview over the phone is that you can have your resume and notes on standby to refer to when the pressure is on. Jot down things you would like to say but be careful not to read your answers or it will sound unnatural. Also have a pen and paper handy so you can keep track of any important things they say during the interview and write down any questions that you would like to ask at the end.Play the partWhile you don’t need to worry about which tie to wear or whether your shoes are polished, smartening yourself up can be an important way of psyching yourself into the right professional mentality. Have a shower, get out of your pyjamas and drag a comb through your hair – your head will be in a much better place for tackling those tricky interview questions! If you look professional, you are much more likely to feel and sound professional.Create a quiet environmentYour surroundings are just as important as the words you’re saying. No matter how brilliantly you answer every question thrown your way, the noise of blaring music, a TV, screaming kids or barking dogs will immediately detract from your professional image and be both distracting and annoying – and that’s not something any job seeker can afford. Find a quiet place where you won’t be distracted and make sure your mobile is turned off. Don’t conduct the interview on a mobile phone if possible – the sound quality can be poor and you might drop out or lose the connection. Have a glass of water handy in case your mouth gets dry, but don’t eat, unwrap food or guzzle drinks during your interview. The image of you chomping away on the other end of the line will leave a bad taste in the interviewer’s mind. Build rapportIt’s crucial for you to build rapport without the usual face-to-face tricks. Using the employer’s name during the course of the interview and smiling when you talk are the telephone equivalents of a firm handshake and eye contact, and will convey warmth and friendliness. Make sure you speak clearly and concisely as it can be more difficult to interpret a person without body language. Also try to make your tone vibrant and dynamic so the interviewer can feel your energy and enthusiasm.  Follow upAt the end of the interview, ask any questions you may have about the job or company. Finish by thanking the interviewer for their time and say you hope to meet them in person. Follow up with an email of thanks to let them know you are keen and to keep yourself fresh in their mind.
  • CarlyPreparing for the interviewRead as much information as you can about the company, including annual reports, press articlesUse LinkedIn to view the profiles of the people who will be on the interview panel – this may help you understand their backgrounds and identify anything you have in common with themAt the interviewPlan to arrive at the interview location ten minutes before your interview – then find a quiet spot to collect your thoughts for 5 minutes before you ‘check in’.Greet the interviewer(s) by name, look them in the eye and firmly shake hands when introduced. Smile! Part of the reason the employer wants to meet you is to find out whether you will fit into the work group. A smile tends to indicate someone who is friendly and warm.Maintain eye contact. This shows confidence and sincerity. If you are being interviewed by more than one person, direct most of your answer to the person who asked the question but occasionally include the rest of the panel by glancing in their direction.If you don’t understand a question, seek clarification. You can do this by simply asking the interviewer to repeat the question or paraphrasing it back to them to ensure you have understood it correctlyAsk the questions you have prepared beforehand – and any others that have come to mind during the course of the interview.End the interview on a positive note by smiling, thanking the interviewer for their time and shaking their hand.
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  • CarlyThe word psychometric is formed from the Greek words for mental and measurement.Provide insight into how you work with other people, how you handle stress, and whether you will be able to cope with the demands of the job.Often administered as a series of online tests and inventories.May be completed at home, at a central location, or as an activity during an assessment centre.Ability – “Can do”Inherited and learned physical and intelligence capabilitiesAttitude – “Wants to”Expressed make-up and styleMay include motivations, beliefs, attitudes, values, interests, preferencesSkills – “Has done”Experience or specialist skillsCompetencies acquired through work experience, training and educationTechnical skillsCandidates ability to interpret verbal and numerical information, and their preferred working style (PwC)Results correlate to pre-determined behavioural competencies that an employer regards as important to the technical and behavioural success in a role (PwC)Personality tests measure or indicate preferences – they are not ‘right or wrong’ answer tests (PwC)It is important to note that results should be viewed as a whole and not in isolation (PwC)
  • CarlyDesigned to assess your logical reasoning or thinking performance.Help organisations understand your potential or capacity in a given area.Consist of multiple choice questions and are administered under exam conditions. Aptitude tests are designed so that very few people will be able to complete all of the questions.May not have time to complete all the questions.They may require you to:Evaluate the logic of different statementsInterpret data from statistical tablesRecognise the logical rules governing statements (SHL)
  • CarlyUsed to assess the mental ability of participants in various areas. Areas that are commonly measured under this banner include tests of abstract reasoning, verbal reasoning, numerical reasoning, mechanical reasoning and spatial reasoning.Abstract reasoning Measure a candidates ability to promptly and accurately learn complex information to aid in problem solving processes. Based on diagrams and measure your ability to identify the underlying logic of a pattern and then determine the solution.Verbal reasoning Focus on the candidates effective use of written ideas and information to construct accurate conclusions. Include questions which test your ability to spell words correctly, use correct grammar, understand analogies and follow detailed written instructions.Numerical reasoning Establish a candidates ability to perform accurate arithmetic to understand and present conclusions regarding numerical data. Emphasise the analysis of numerical data through the interpretation of graphs and basic calculations. Include questions on basic arithmetic, number sequences and simple mathematics. In more complex numerical critical reasoning questions, blocks of information are provided that require interpretation.Spatial reasoning focus on a candidates ability to perceive, construct and deconstruct visual objects within differing contexts. measure your ability to manipulate shapes in two dimensions or to visualize three-dimensional objects presented as two-dimensional pictures.Perceptual ability aptitude with pictures and diagramsInformation checking attention to detail, correcting errors
  • CarlyNo specific preparation is required for psychometric testing as it measures your skills, general abilities, cognitive processes and behaviours.Find out what assessments you will be taking and what they will tell the employer about your fit to the job or role.Practice tests – in some cases, you may also receive a feedback report to help you. (SHL)Be confident in your abilities, and know your strengths and weaknesses.A little bit of adrenalin is OK but don't become overstressed. You are usually more alert and able to perform more strongly at this time of day.It's not the end of the world if you're finding a test difficult. Remember it is only one section of the entire assessment process and a decision is never made on solely one assessment criteria. (PsychPress)You can’t really prepare for an aptitude test, as it measures your potential / aptitude (SHL)However, everyday exposure tho those types of skills may help enhance and develop those skills (reading more complex journals, completing crosswords, Sudoku, etc) (SHL)Taking a break between tests will allow you to come back refreshed and ready to go againBefore each test you will commonly be given a series of examples. Take these slowly and learn from your mistakes.Taking practice tests is a great way of gaining experience about what may be expected on the day. Personality InventoriesHard to prepare for as they typically measure relatively stable behavioural tendencies. Aptitude and Ability TestsYou can’t really prepare for an aptitude test, as it measures your potential / aptitude.Before each test you will commonly be given a series of examples. Take these slowly and learn from your mistakes.
  • CarlyPersonality inventories• Although there is no time limit, you should work quickly rather than pondering at length over any one question. This helps you give your most natural answer; the one that best reflects how you are.• The questionnaire is about your personality style; that is, the way that you go about things. It is not about ability and there are no right or wrong answers. Just answer as you are.• Don’t worry if some questions do not seem relevant. Employers will be focusing on those areas most relevant to your situationAptitude testsThe problems usually become more complex as the test progresses. Don’t be concerned if you do not complete all of the questions - its the number of correct answers that matters.
  • CarlyIf you are offered the opportunity for feedback, use it to find out as much about yourself as you can. This may be helpful in understanding yourself and your strengths and areas for improvement during testing.Test results should be provided to you in a private feedback sessionIs it how you were perceived?Are there areas for development?What are you doing well?
  • CarlyPeople who try to guess what is wanted are often incorrect and may give an impression of themselves that does not fit in with other information. Many questionnaires contain questions which help check whether someone is describing him or herself honestly and consistently, so try to be as accurate as possible when answering the questions.Don’t make assumptions about the way you should respond. If you try and guess what the assessors are looking for, you may be wrong. It is usually best to be yourself, and respond honestly. Remember that it’s not in your interest to get a job to which you are not well suited. Beware that some organisations will re-test candidates when they have originally sat the test online at home to ensure that they sat the test.
  • CarlyComplete crosswords, number games and puzzles to sharpen your problem solving ability (La Trobe)
  • CarlyWhat is it? When is it used?Why do they use it?Most graduate recruitment programs include some kind of assessment centre activityAlso – large companies recruiting a number of employers at one: e.g. optus gets new contract – usually do a group activityDesigned to assess: how u relate to othersAnd how well you would do at coping with the pressures and tasks of the job ‘simulated activities’Therefore – fairer than just interview because more opportunities to show abilitiesBut – need to be aware of what they are assessing in each activity and do your preperation as you would for an interivew
  • CarlyAssessment Centres operate on the principle of a "cross reference" system.Commonly used by large companies.Collections of tests and exercises designed to simulate an employer’s business environment.Some of the big four accounting firms put prospective partners through an assessment centre prior to their promotion. Also used to identify training needs and for long term career planning.
  • You are being assessed against competencies and not against other candidates; however your interactions and attitude are key. Results are compared against the same competencies, which are measured in other activities.On completion, observers meet to discuss the test results and reach a group consensus about each individual's ratings.
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  • Carly…so that you can do some preparationTreat this as you would an interview. You will be assessed not only on your performance but also your appearance and presentation. Make sure you allow plenty of time to get there. Careers and Employment at La Trobe University’s Melbourne (Bundoora) campus has an excellent video, ‘The Assessment Centre’, illustrating what the assessors are looking for.
  • CarlyThere are benefits on both sides to fitting the right person to the you so try to be yourself.AFTER THE ASSESSMENT CENTRE:Feedback is much more detailed and relevant to the task for assessment centres.If you are not offered feedback, ask if it's available.
  • JasonLimit of 50 linked in photos – first come basisBookings were required for afternoon sessions – if you have not booked and would like to attend please go to the room and see if places are available.
  • JasonLimit of 50 linked in photos – first come basisBookings were required for afternoon sessions – if you have not booked and would like to attend please go to the room and see if places are available.
  • Jason
  • Jobsearch masterclass presentation mid 2013

    1. 1. latrobe.edu.au CRICOS Provider 00115M Title of presentation Name of presenter Title of presenter School / Faculty / Division xx Month 201x Jobsearch Masterclass Career Development Centre La Trobe University
    2. 2. 2Click to edit Master text styles Seminar Overview • Researching opportunities • Resumes • Online Applications • Behavioral Questions • Networking • Break – Networking morning tea in DW117 • Interviews • Psychometric Testing • Assessment Centres
    3. 3. 3Click to edit Master text styles Afternoon Activities Linkedin Photo Booth 12:45pm - 1:45pm and 3:30pm - 4:30pm Photography studio: Level 2, Education 2 Interview Skills Session 1:30 – 3pm • NOW in ELT4 Mock Assessment Centre 1:30 – 3:30pm • ED1 402
    4. 4. 4Click to edit Master text styles What are the opportunities to get experience? Formal or informal programs for penultimate or final year students Vacation programs • Degree related work usually at end of second last year of study • Usually offered by large organisations also offering graduate programs Internships / Work placements • Supervised work experience in an area related to study and / or career interests • Can occur at any time of year for various lengths of time • You can arrange an informal placement yourself! Cadetships • Position offered to students or graduates providing training on the job • Can be full time or part time • Often offered in conjunction with industry bodies or university faculties
    5. 5. 5Click to edit Master text styles Eligibility for formal vacation programs • Check eligibility with each employer • Mostly undergraduate students in the penultimate year of their degree (ie the summer before your final year) • Many firms take only students with permanent residence status • More info on vacation programs can be found at: http://www.graduateopportunities.com/free-downloads/ebooks/
    6. 6. 6Click to edit Master text styles A sample of organisations offering vacation programs • Accenture (‘stay tuned’!) • Aurecon Engineering (apply now, closes 28 July) • Deloitte (apply now, no listed closing date) • Dept of Agriculture, Fisheries & Forestry (DAFF) (open September) • Ernst & Young (apply now, closes 14 August) • GE (apply now, closes 21 August) • KPMG (apply now, no listed closing date) • McGrath Nichol (apply now, no listed closing date) • Origin Energy (apply now, no listed closing date) • Pitcher Partners (applications open August) • Price Waterhouse Coopers (apply now, no listed closing date) • Reckitt Benckiser (open 26 July, closes 20 August) • Reserve Bank of Australia Cadetship (ongoing, check website) • Suncorp (applications open August) • Telstra (apply now, closes 29 July) • Woodside (apply now, closes 24 July for general and 16 August for Accounting)
    7. 7. 7Click to edit Master text styles What are the opportunities for graduate jobs? Graduate programs • Structured professional development programs lasting 1-2 years in large organisations specifically for new graduates • Many applications must be submitted a year in advance, whilst some are ongoing • Only one option! Graduate positions • Formal full time positions offered by organisations of all sizes to students who are about to / have recently completed their studies • Advertised on job boards (seek, careerhub) , by professional associations or just on company website Entry level opportunities • Get a ‘foot in the door’ in an organisation that provides further opportunities for training and development and work your way up
    8. 8. 8Click to edit Master text styles Typical stages of the selection process* Reference and Probity Checks Face to Face Interview Assessment Centre (usually formal programs only) Psychometric Testing (usually formal programs only) Phone Screening (may occur) Online application
    9. 9. Researching Opportunities
    10. 10. 10Click to edit Master text styles Researching vacation and internship programs www.graduateopportunities.com/ www.unigrad.com.au/ www.gradconnection.com.au/ http://forums.whirlpool.net.au/forum/136
    11. 11. 11Click to edit Master text styles Tips for researching vacation placements / internships Identify the various sources of information available to you:  Faculty/school websites and emails  Industry and professional association websites  Industry-based learning within your course  Volunteering
    12. 12. 12Click to edit Master text styles Graduate jobs info and resources
    13. 13. 13Click to edit Master text styles Advertised general job vacancies • Employment websites www.seek.com.au www.mycareer.com.au www.careerone.com.au • La Trobe’s CareerHub latrobe.edu.au/students/careers • Company websites • Professional associations • Recruitment agencies www.rcsa.com.au • Newspapers
    14. 14. 14Click to edit Master text styles Tips for job websites • Register your profile so employers can search for you • Subscribe to job email alerts • Check everyday for new listings • Apply ASAP – many employers close vacancies once they receive enough applications
    15. 15. 15Click to edit Master text styles Tips for using Recruitment Agencies to find graduate jobs • They work for the employer, not you • Register with agencies advertising jobs in your field • Build relationship with recruiter • Accept short-term / contract roles • Ask for feedback on resume, interviews What are 3 things I could do to improve my interview performance? In what ways could I make improvements to my resume?
    16. 16. 16Click to edit Master text styles ‘Canvassing’ for a graduate job or work placement 1. Identify companies in your target industry to contact 2. Identify potential contacts within each company Hiring managers, not HR departments! Use LinkedIn, personal networks, company websites, to find contacts 3. Decide on contact approach Email, phone, social media, in-person 4. Prepare tailored cover letter and resume 5. Make contact and provide a copy of your resume 6. Follow-up as appropriate or agreed
    17. 17. Resumes
    18. 18. 18Click to edit Master text styles Resumes – The Essentials Before creating a resume consider: • Your unique combination of skills & experience • How these relate to what the employer is looking for • Clearly and concisely marketing this information Resumedevelopment is a process of collating evidence of relevant skills and experience and marketing this persuasivelyto a potential employer Deliver your message in 30 seconds of reading time
    19. 19. 19Click to edit Master text styles Your Resume Will it get read? Only if it’s professionally presented skill you need to demonstrate: attention to detail Will it get you an interview? Only if it demonstrates the specific skills, knowledge and personal characteristics that the position requires and the organisation is looking for skill you need to demonstrate: ability to assemble and present relevant information
    20. 20. 20Click to edit Master text styles Resumes – Your key selling points What should your resume contain? • Your awareness of, and participation in, the relevant industry/profession • Your objective • Your achievements • Your skills • Targeted for each individual position and employer
    21. 21. 21Click to edit Master text styles Resumes – The Essentials Awareness of industry/discipline • Career objective • specific & targeted • demonstrates your motivation and awareness of the different sectors of industry • not vague or general • Evidence of industry-relevant activities: student placements, voluntary activities, employment, active membership of professional association, extra-curricula activities
    22. 22. 22Click to edit Master text styles Identifying relevant achievements • What projects are you proud of that support your job objective? • What are some quantifiable results that point out your ability? • When did you positively affect the organization, the bottom line, your boss, your co-workers, your clients? • What awards, commendations, publications, etc., have you achieved that relate to your job objective? • When have you demonstrated P.A.R. (Problem, Action, Result)? • Can have a separate Achievements section, or incorporate in other sections e.g. education, employment
    23. 23. 23Click to edit Master text styles Examples of Achievements • Promotions • Positions of responsibility • Increasing sales figures • Running a project to change something in your company • Being part of a team that … • Winning an award or prize • Good results in exams or assessments • Gaining additional qualifications • Customer service / quality awards • Outside-work achievements – raising money for charity, being elected to a committee • Achieving in individual or group sports
    24. 24. 24Click to edit Master text styles Resumes – The Essentials Targeted skills statements get results! • Identify key skills the position/organisation requires • Can you demonstrate that you have the skills required for this job? • What activities, paid and unpaid, have you done that used skills you’ll be using at your new job? • Maximise chances of obtaining an interview by providing evidence of skills relevant to the position • Don’t make claims without evidence, eg, stating you have ‘excellent teamwork skills’ without providing context
    25. 25. 25Click to edit Master text styles Skills Statement Examples SKILLS Teamwork • Played netball and basketball on a weekly basis for the last three years, attended all training sessions and assisted with away game planning • Regularly filled in for other team members at Eastern Health covering extra shifts when needed • Worked in a multi-disciplinary team of 6 students to complete a project on ..... For which we received 80% (A grade) Organisational Skills • Coordinated a team of 8 volunteers for the Salvation Army Red Shield Appeal 2011, ensuring fundraising target of $2000 was met • Organised a venue and liaised with caterers for the La Trobe Ski Club Ball attended by 450 people, 2012 • Successfully managed a part-time job of up to 12 hours per week, regular involvement in club sport, voluntary tutoring work and full time study
    26. 26. Online Applications
    27. 27. 27Click to edit Master text styles Online application forms • 77% of employers have an online application process. • Designed for you to provide evidence that you have the skills and attributes matching the selection criteria. • Filling out application forms can be time consuming - allow at least 1-2 hours per application. Source: Unigrad 2012
    28. 28. 28Click to edit Master text styles Strategies to succeed Research  the position (what questions are likely to be asked?)  the organisation (what attitudes & skills are valued?)  your background (what evidence can you provide?) ̶ your motivation, experiences, skills Communication  summarise your key selling points  keep it simple and structured
    29. 29. 29Click to edit Master text styles Tips for online applications • Allow plenty of time to complete the application form. • Read and follow the employer’s instructions!! • Stick to word limits!!! • Proof-read for spelling, grammar and punctuation. • Ensure your documentation is of a professional standard. • Save files in a version that anyone can open. • Keep a copy of your submitted application. • Diarise the application closing date and submit your application well before then.
    30. 30. 30Click to edit Master text styles Online Application Questions •Closed questions •Requiring right/wrong or yes/no answers •More common in assessment tasks, exams, tests •Open general questions •Behavioural questions
    31. 31. 31Click to edit Master text styles Typical questions relating to your goals, career objective, knowledge of company • What’s the achievement you’re proudest of? • What are your strengths and weaknesses? • What four words best describe you? • What appeals to you about our firm and why you would like to work here? • Why are you interested in joining our graduate program? • What are your long term aspirations? • Please describe what interests you about a career in ......
    32. 32. 32Click to edit Master text styles Question 1 Why do you want to work for the Victorian Public Service as opposed to other graduate opportunities? What do you feel you could contribute to the work done by the Victorian Public Service? (Please limit your response to 250 words or less). Question 2 Please provide an example of a time when you had to work as part of a team to accomplish an objective. Describe the task, what your role in the team was, and what outcomes the team achieved. (Please limit your response to 250 words or less). Information that exceeds these limits will not be considered. (109 words on this slide) Sample Online Questions
    33. 33. 33Click to edit Master text styles Developing answers to open general questions Identify your key selling points • review selection criteria and job description Demonstrate self-awareness on main issues: • your skills and qualities, both personal and professional • how you chose this career pathway • motivation: why working in this industry and occupation is important to you • what makes you passionate about your work in general and this job in particular Link your own story to the industry/discipline and the organisation
    34. 34. Behavioural Questions
    35. 35. 35Click to edit Master text styles Behavioural/Competency-Based Questions • Used at application and interview stages • Companies identify the competencies required to do the job – these form the basis of the questions • “We can predict future performance from past behaviour” • You are asked to discuss concrete EXAMPLES from your own experiences to prove you possess the required competencies Cues: • “Can you tell me about a time when….?” • “Can you give us an example of a time when…….?” Types of questions: behavioural questions
    36. 36. 36Click to edit Master text styles Example Questions Communication “Can you give us an example of a time when you had to deliver a difficult message to an individual or team?” Teamwork “Can you give me an example of a time when you have been part of a successful team?”
    37. 37. 37Click to edit Master text styles Tips for answering behavioural questions • Don’t provide general statements such as “I have extremely well developed communication skills” without backing it up with evidence. • Provide real examples from your studies, work, and extra- curricular activities that are relevant and specific. • Include an indicator of success or the result. • Try to use a different example for each question. • Adhere to word limits. • Don’t exaggerate or apologise.
    38. 38. 38Click to edit Master text styles Structure your response in a four-step process: S T A R S ituation – What was the situation/context T ask – What was the task/event you encountered A ction – Describe the action you took R esult – What was the outcome Use specific examples - ideally within past 1-2 years, from your studies, placements, employment, voluntary activities.
    39. 39. 39Click to edit Master text styles Situation Describe the situation / environment you were in Include context, details and time. Task What did you need to accomplish to deal with the situation? What was your role concerning the problem, issue or assignment? Action What did you do? Set out the steps you took to resolve the situation Provide detail – how you listened to the unhappy customer. What strategy did you use to manage your time? How did you influence your team? Result What happened? What did you accomplish? What did you learn? Promote yourself and your achievements
    40. 40. 40Click to edit Master text styles Example Can you tell us about a time you have demonstrated excellent organisational skills? I have developed excellent organisational skills through my part- time job as an event assistant at XYZ Events. In this role I am responsible for booking staff to set up marquees at private functions. To perform this job I need to identify all jobs booked for that day, calculate how many staff are needed to set up each event, and ensure that there is sufficient time to set up each event by the time required.
    41. 41. 41Click to edit Master text styles Example - action Excellent organisational skills Last month I discovered that one of the sales staff had booked an event, but forgot to enter the booking into the system. As I had already created the schedule for the event staff to follow, it was too late to make changes. I quickly made some phone calls to other event staff not rostered on for the day and found two people who were able to come to work immediately. I then arranged for a spare truck to be loaded with the marquees, so that when the event staff arrived, they were able to deliver the marquee to the customer immediately.
    42. 42. 42Click to edit Master text styles Example - result Excellent organisational skills The result was that the marquee was set up in time, thus avoiding a major disruption to the customers’ event. My supervisor was very impressed with the work that I did to resolve the issue and gave me some movie tickets as a small reward.
    43. 43. Networking
    44. 44. 44Click to edit Master text styles • Talking about you • Sharing your knowledge with others • Talking with a purpose • What do you want? Names, ideas, introductions? • Communicate your personal brand How to Network • Actively listen • Ask the right questions • Be interested in the answers • Ask open ended questions Networking
    45. 45. 45Click to edit Master text styles Social networking Facebook • Will anything be embarrassing if seen by an employer? • Ensure privacy settings keep employers separated from friends LinkedIn • Best for professional networking • Upload your resume • Have a professional summary • Keep up to date with referees and ex-colleagues
    46. 46. 46Click to edit Master text styles LinkedIn
    47. 47. 47Click to edit Master text styles How to use LinkedIn • Add people that you meet including recruiters at the expo • Join a special interest group related to your field • Engage in conversations in the interest groups • Update your status regularly ‘seeking opportunities in...’ • Use the resume builder • Ask former colleagues and employers to complete a recommendation on your account • Follow up your contacts regularly, use the in built email in LinkedIn or send directly to their email address
    48. 48. 48Click to edit Master text styles Social networking for research • Use Linked in and other sites to gain further info on graduate opportunities , employer expectations and company culture • Forums can be a good source of info on what to expect from those who have been through the process o e.g. whirlpool, gradconnection, wikijob etc.
    49. 49. 49Click to edit Master text styles Gradconnection – employer forum sessions
    50. 50. 50Click to edit Master text styles
    51. 51. Networking at Events
    52. 52. 52Click to edit Master text styles Preparing to attend professional association & employer events • Research the event before attending and consider who might be attending who hires graduates from your discipline. • Make a list of organisations or people you want to talk to. • Prepare questions to ask potential employers you are targeting. • Bring your résumé, a notepad and pen, and a card with your contact details to give to potential employers. • Have a neat and tidy appearance.
    53. 53. 53Click to edit Master text styles Develop your elevator pitch A brief summary that introduces who you are, your interests, skills and experiences, and states what you are seeking “Hi, my name is ... I have recently graduated from La Trobe University with a science degree majoring in genetics. I’m really interested in how we can use web 2.0 technology to increase people’s awareness of inherited disorders. I am interested in the research work your company has undertaken in this area especially relating to ...”
    54. 54. 54Click to edit Master text styles Your elevator pitch Can be used for:  Networking events – to introduce yourself  In an interview ‘tell us about yourself’  In a cover letter introduction (if written formally)  At a BBQ!
    55. 55. 55Click to edit Master text styles Develop your elevator pitch - Activity Action: Take 5 minutes to draft out your elevator pitch What do you want to say about yourself? • qualification/s and experience • work competencies and personal qualities • interest in the position, the organisation and industry • current situation and availability to commence work
    56. 56. 56Click to edit Master text styles Now you need a business card ... Be professional, be ready, be contactable! Action: Take 5 minutes to draft a business card • Write 3 copies of a business card • What do you want to say about yourself? Josephine Bloggs BA (hons) Creative writing specialist; blogger; trainer 0400 000 001 jobloggs@gmail.com
    57. 57. 57Click to edit Master text styles Ending a conversation “I plan on circulating the room, but it’s been great meeting you. Do you have a card?” “There are a number of students waiting to chat to you, so I’ll let you go. Do you have a card?” “It’s been great speaking with you. I’ll send you a copy of my resume tomorrow. Do you have a card?”
    58. 58. 58Click to edit Master text styles Follow up If you don’t follow up, what was the point going to the event? Consider sending an email or message after the event • Thank them for their time • A document or weblink you discussed • Your resume if appropriate • Send an invite to join your Linkedin network 21 July 2013
    59. 59. Break – Networking Morning Tea DWB 117 – student common room Practice your elevator pitch!
    60. 60. Interviews
    61. 61. 61Click to edit Master text styles Why an interview? An interview is used to find out: • Can you do the job? Do you have the skills, knowledge and experience appropriate for the role? • Will you do the job? What’s your motivation? Are you enthusiastic about the position and the organisation? • Will you fit in? Do you fit within the organisation’s culture and workplace environment?
    62. 62. 62Click to edit Master text styles Phone screening • Many organisations conduct a brief phone interview early in the selection process. • This can happen when you least expect it. If the timing is inconvenient let them know when would be more suitable.
    63. 63. 63Click to edit Master text styles Tips for phone interviews • Treat a phone interview as seriously as a face to face interview. • Ensure your phone is fully charged and that you have good reception. • Answer your phone in a professional manner. • Take the call in quiet place, free from interruptions. • Speak clearly and smile. • Have your resume and application handy but don’t be distracted by them. • Ensure that your voicemail message is professional.
    64. 64. 64Click to edit Master text styles Preparing for behavioural interviews • Review the selection criteria or key competencies required for the role; identify the key skills required. • Prepare examples. Think of examples from your recent past, draw on a range of experiences – study, placements, work, voluntary, sport/recreation. • Identify the STAR steps for each example • Be specific, describe what you did; don’t give vague statements, provide concrete examples that demonstrate your skills and abilities • Practice responding to questions. Become confident in using your examples.
    65. 65. 65Click to edit Master text styles Strategies to succeed at interview Research • the position (what questions are likely to be asked?) • the organisation (what attitudes & skills are valued?) • your background (what evidence can you provide?) • your motivation, experiences, skills Communication • summarise your key selling points • keep it simple and structured Behaviour • Interpersonal skills (eye contact, body language) • Relax! (you should know the answers!)
    66. 66. 66Click to edit Master text styles Additional interview resources • www.latrobe.edu.au/students/careers → How to succeed at a job interview • Book a practice interview with a Careers Consultant • www.seek.com.au/career-resources • www.kent.ac.uk/careers/interviews • http://www.wikijob.co.uk/ • Youtube employer channels for interview tips e.g. http://www.youtube.com/user/accentureuscareers http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=blJwjfDqcvA
    67. 67. Psychometric Testing
    68. 68. 68Click to edit Master text styles Psychometric Testing What are psychometric tests? • A series of multiple choice questions which aim to objectively measure attributes like intelligence, aptitude and personality. • Can be used to assess ability as well as potential. • Administered online or using paper and pencil under standardised conditions. What do they measure? • Ability – “Can do” • Attitude – “Wants to” • Skills – “Has done”
    69. 69. 69Click to edit Master text styles Aptitude and ability tests • Measure skills and abilities relevant to a position or occupation. • Typically cover a broad ability area (e.g. verbal / numerical reasoning), not knowledge (e.g. accounting). • Measure intellectual abilities as well as potential to learn and understand new information in a limited timeframe. • May simulate elements of a task to assess your ability to perform that task. • There are “right” and “wrong” answers. • Performed under timed conditions.
    70. 70. 70Click to edit Master text styles Aptitude and ability tests • Abstract reasoning • Verbal reasoning • Numerical reasoning • Spatial reasoning • Perceptual ability • Information checking • Technical 21 July 2013
    71. 71. 71Click to edit Master text styles Preparing for psychometric tests Find out from the employer relevant information such as: • What sort of tests do they conduct? • What do the tests measure? • How long will the tests go for? • Can you use a calculator in numeric tests? • Take practice tests to familiarise yourself with the types of questions that may be asked. • Try to undertake your testing in the morning if possible. • If completing multiple tests, take a break between them.
    72. 72. 72Click to edit Master text styles Strategies for during the test Personality Inventories • Don't overly deliberate about any one particular question. Your first response is usually best. • Don’t try to answer as you think you should; answer honestly. Aptitude Tests • Work quickly and accurately. • Don’t be surprised if you can’t answer all questions. 21 July 2013
    73. 73. 73Click to edit Master text styles Getting feedback after testing • Many organisations will offer you feedback, regardless of whether or not you are successful. • If feedback is not offered, ask if it can be made available. 21 July 2013
    74. 74. 74Click to edit Master text styles A word on faking • Most personality inventories have built-in lie detectors to identify candidates who are answering in a socially desirably manner (i.e. ‘faking’). • As many personality inventories measure a range of personality traits, it’s difficult to ‘fake’ every scale. • It’s hard to predict the personality traits that organisations are looking for, so it’s best to respond honestly. 21 July 2013
    75. 75. 75Click to edit Master text styles Improving your test performance Verbal Reasoning Tests Read newspapers, reports, business journals. Do verbal problem solving exercises, e.g. crosswords. Numerical Reasoning Tests Read financial reports in newspapers. Study tables of data and practice your mental arithmetic. Abstract Reasoning Tests Solve puzzles in newspapers and magazines involving diagrams. Play games involving sequences or strategies, e.g. chess, draughts. Source: SHL 21 July 2013
    76. 76. Assessment Centres
    77. 77. 77Click to edit Master text styles What are assessment centres? • A series of exercises or activities designed to assess how candidates relate to others or how candidates cope with various tasks and demands. • Aim to replicate some of the key tasks and assesses how you deal with the scenarios you are put in. • Highly structured in their design, application and procedures. • There will typically be multiple assessors, evaluating you against multiple competencies in multiple exercises. • Can last from half a day to three days. 21 July 2013
    78. 78. 78Click to edit Master text styles What happens on the day? • Several candidates will be present. • Some exercises will involve other candidates, some you may do on your own. • You will be assessed against a number of key competencies required to do the job. • Trained observers will rate individuals on a range of competencies, using a prescribed performance scale. • There will typically be multiple assessors, evaluating you against multiple competencies in multiple exercises.
    79. 79. 79Click to edit Master text styles Typical activities • Ice breakers • Presentation • In tray task • Aptitude tests • Group task • Case study • Role play
    80. 80. 80Click to edit Master text styles What do they measure? Competencies that may be assessed during an assessment centre include: • Team work • Communication • Leadership • Influencing • Problem solving 21 July 2013
    81. 81. 81Click to edit Master text styles Skills Role Play / Presentation In Tray Written Report Group Discussion Psychometric Tests Interview OVERALL Team Work Communication Problem solving and analysis Attention to detail Commercial acumen Planning and organising Interpersonal effectiveness Skills matrix
    82. 82. 82Click to edit Master text styles Preparing for assessment centres • Find out what sorts of activities will be used. • Identify your strengths and weaknesses. • Think of examples that demonstrate your skills. • Familiarise yourself with the job description and know the selection criteria. • Research the employer and industry beforehand. • Dress appropriately. • Get a good night’s sleep beforehand. • Stay calm. Practise deep breathing.
    83. 83. 83Click to edit Master text styles Tips for during the assessment  Listen to and read all instructions carefully.  Don't make assumptions about the way in which you are expected to respond. Be yourself and respond honestly.  Be respectful of the other participants.  Avoid being either passive or aggressive.  Employers will be looking at you to see how you interact with others, during the activities and in the breaks.  Don't give up if you perform badly on one task. There will be other opportunities to demonstrate your skills.  Try not to compare yourself with others.  Be yourself!
    84. 84. 84Click to edit Master text styles Reminder: Afternoon Activities Linkedin Photo Booth 12:45pm - 1:45pm and 3:30pm - 4:30pm Photography studio: Level 2, Education 2 Interview Skills Session 1:30 – 3pm • NOW in ELT4 Mock Assessment Centre 1:30 – 3:30pm • ED1 402
    85. 85. 85Click to edit Master text styles MOCK ASSESSMENT CENTRE YOU ARE HERE PHOTO BOOTH AGORA
    86. 86. 86Click to edit Master text styles Directions Linkedin Photo Booth Level 2, Education 2 Exit via top lecture theatre doors, turn right and walk along walkway through HU2 to ED2, you will see ‘photography sign’. Enter photography services on the right. Mock Assessment Centre 1:30 – 3:30pm ED1 402 Continue walking past photography until you reach ED1. Take lift or stairs to 4th floor.
    87. 87. Thank you latrobe.edu.au CRICOS Provider 00115M Contact Us: Bundoora: Level 1, Peribolos East 9479 2459 www.latrobe.edu.au/students/careers careers@latrobe.edu.au www.facebook.com/LaTrobeCareers @LTUcareers

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