Lsntap triage and expert systems slides

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This webinar will highlight new tools and approaches that aid advocates with legal screening, triage and analysis activities, and help litigants navigate unfamiliar legal processes. We'll hear from panelists working on cutting edge projects in the nonprofit legal sector, how expert systems can enhance service delivery and support community partnerships, and tools and techniques that focus on balancing considerations rather than applying rules. Join us to hear about what's new - and what's next - in this area.

Panelists:

· Zach Hutchinson, Student and Research Assistant, Georgetown University Law Center

· Adam Friedl, Program and Special Initiatives Manager at Pro Bono Net

· Donna Dougherty, Attorney-in-Charge at JASA/Legal Services for the Elderly in Queens

· Marc Lauritsen, President, Capstone Practice Systems

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Lsntap triage and expert systems slides

  1. 1. Triage and expert systems in legal aid: New tools to assist people in need and the advocates that serve them July 23, 2014
  2. 2. Our panel today Zach Hutchinson Student and Research Assistant, Georgetown University Law Center Adam Friedl Program and Special Initiatives Manager at Pro Bono Net Donna Dougherty Attorney-in-Charge at JASA/Legal Services for the Elderly in Queens Marc Lauritsen President, Capstone Practice Systems Liz Keith (Moderator) Program Director, Pro Bono Net
  3. 3. Takeaways How can new technologies and design approaches: • Aid advocates with legal screening, triage and analysis • Help litigants navigate unfamiliar process • Support community partnerships to expand access to assistance
  4. 4. Community approaches • Neota Logic • Drools engine • HotDocs and A2J Author guided interviews • Drupal-based options • HTML / Javascript (for simple, formulaic tools) • You tell us!
  5. 5. Resources on other “next generation” triage and intake initiatives • 2013 LSNTAP.org training – Beyond Online Intake • http://www.slideshare.net/LSNTAP/beyond-online-intake-final • 2014 LSC TIG Conference workshop – Online Triage and Intake: To Infinity and Beyond • http://tig.lsc.gov/tig-conference/past-conferences/2014-tig- conference • 2014 EJC workshop – Online Intake and Triage Systems • http://www.americanbar.org/groups/probono_public_service/resour ces/archive/workshop_archive_20131.html • 2013 LSC Technology Initiative Grant awards • http://tig.lsc.gov/sites/lsc.gov/files/TIG/pdfs/TIG-2013grants.pdf
  6. 6. Three Triage and Legal Analysis Expert Systems Developed at Georgetown University Law Center Zach Hutchinson Student and Research Assistant, Georgetown University Law Center
  7. 7. EJC Wage Theft App - Triage and Legal Analysis https://lawstudents.neotalogic.com/a/wagetheft
  8. 8. OAH Unemployment App - Simple Legal Analysis https://lawstudents.neotalogic.com/a/oah-advisor
  9. 9. MIDAS (Military Discharge App) – Complex Legal Analysis https://lawstudents.neotalogic.com/a/midas-dec3-2013
  10. 10. Expert Systems Discussion • Thinking like a programmer – building the app • Thinking like a lawyer – domain knowledge • Thinking like a designer – user experience
  11. 11. The DEN Debt and Eviction Navigator https://lawstudents.neotalogic.com/a/jasa-den Donna Dougherty, JASA Legal Services for the Elderly Adam Friedl, Pro Bono Net
  12. 12. The Big Idea: • Enable social workers visiting homebound, elderly clients to perform legal screenings • 2 areas of focus (I didn’t want to say “foci”): • Housing • Consumer Debt • Direct clients to appropriate resources/referrals
  13. 13. Expert Systems • Screening process designed by substantive experts • Interviewer diagnoses client situation and suggests next steps • Social worker is on hand to help facilitate and navigate
  14. 14. Future steps • Eventually incorporate e-filing • Broaden subject areas • Generate Statistical Data, Analysis and Reports
  15. 15. Tools of Choice Marc Lauritsen July 2014
  16. 16. Going beyond databases, document assembly, guided interviews, and expert systems Supporting choice requires
  17. 17. Databases are great for • Gathering, storing, and retrieving information • Searching and finding information • Not just numbers and texts, but images, sounds, video, … • Statistics, reports
  18. 18. Document assembly is great for • Creating customized documents and forms • Intelligent questionnaires and checklists • Information gathering • Individualized guidance
  19. 19. A2J guided interviews are great for • Gathering information needed for document assembly, case intake, or other purposes • Audio, video, images • Making online resources more accessible • Individualized guidance
  20. 20. Expert systems are great for • Rule-based reasoning (backward and forward chaining) • Non-procedural (‘declarative’) knowledge • Explanation • Individualized guidance
  21. 21. But None of these are particularly good for helping people make choices
  22. 22. Choices involve competing values and perspectives They’re not algorithmic You can’t look up or compute the answer
  23. 23. Law-related Choices Clients and Self-helpers • Ways to deal with legal problems • Lawyer/firm selection • Business decisions • Entity type • Hiring/firing • Employee/contractor • Compliance, risk management • Negotiation and settlement Professionals • What position to take, what advice to give • Case triage • Litigation • Where to file • What witnesses to call • What arguments to make • Business • What software or hardware • What vendors/consultants • Who to hire
  24. 24. Legal Services Contexts • Which types of cases to accept • Which particular clients to help, with what forms of assistance • Case strategy – what claims to make where; what arguments/evidence to emphasize • Contract/settlement negotiation – which package of terms lets you ‘get to yes’ • Which office technology to adopt • LSC technology funding priorities
  25. 25. Example: Triage
  26. 26. Factors in play • Recipient needs, interests, & circumstances • Nature of ‘stake’ and likelihood of success • Capacity for self-help • Provider resources, interests, & circumstances • Availability • Priorities / Preferences • System/Society interests • Fairness • Overall impact on just outcomes • System improvement
  27. 27. Challenges • Demand greatly exceeds resources • Complex recipient circumstances • Changing provider circumstances (resource availability, priorities) • Competing views about which kinds of problems deserve which kinds of assistance
  28. 28. Representation Online Doc Assembly
  29. 29. BUT … Most decisions involve many “hands”: • more than two options, and • more than a couple considerations, • of varying degrees of importance, • with people disagreeing both about the relative importance of considerations and how the options ‘do’ on them.
  30. 30. How can technology help?
  31. 31. 32
  32. 32. Aspen Workflow LawBase Practice Manager (RealLegal) Practice Master Time Matters The product Essential features Tickler Conflict checking Remote access Reporting Other product factors Document mgt Timekeeping Custom intake screens Integration with DA Relevance to graduates’ practices Security options Vendor stability User community Other law schools? Pre-built modules? Cost (product & any newly required software) The services Customization Training Cost Other notes
  33. 33. 34
  34. 34. Factor Factor Factor Perspective Perspective Perspective Option Option Option Rating Rating Rating Rating Rating Rating Rating Rating Rating A choicebox
  35. 35. Features Interface Ease of learning Jane John Combined Ace Acm e Apex 7 8 9 Best Good Better 6 7 5 Choosing a case management system
  36. 36. Totals 1 3 2
  37. 37. US Legal Services Corporation
  38. 38. Opinions Ideas Experiences ??
  39. 39. Note: This data is illustrative. See Greacen report for final ratings.
  40. 40. Going Deeper • A Decision Space for Legal Service Delivery • Dancing in the Cloud • Which – a simple HotDocs-based example of choiceboxing on LawHelp Interactive [Best viewed in Chrome or IE] • Preparing Law Students for Choice Jobs (Presentation at 2014 CALI conference) • 'Boxing' Choices for Better Dispute Resolution, Int'l Journal of Online Dispute Resolution (1) 1, 70-92 (2014)
  41. 41. Thank you to our panel! Zach Hutchinson - zachary.b.hutchinson@gmail.com Student and Research Assistant, Georgetown University Law Center Adam Friedl - afriedl@probono.net Program and Special Initiatives Manager at Pro Bono Net Donna Dougherty - ddougherty@jasa.org Attorney-in-Charge at JASA/Legal Services for the Elderly in Queens Marc Lauritsen – marc@capstonepractice.com President, Capstone Practice Systems Liz Keith (Moderator) – lkeith@probono.net Program Director, Pro Bono Net
  42. 42. THANK YOU FOR ATTENDING TODAY! Be sure to check out www.lsntap.org for information regarding the next LSTNAP Community Training!
  43. 43. Contact Information Brian Rowe (brianr@nwjustice.org) or via chat on www.lsntap.org Don’t forget to take our feedback survey!

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