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Intro to UX

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In this video we talk about what US is and how to gather information to make a good one with the help of two case studies.

You can find the video that goes with this here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nK9LHXa8x7A

Published in: Technology
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Intro to UX

  1. 1. A WHIRLWIND TOUR OF USER EXPERIENCE TECHNIQUES May 2018
  2. 2. INTROS: LAURA QUINN Principal, Laura Quinn Consulting
  3. 3. INTROS: RACHEL HARRIS Ohio Legal Help Project Coordinator, Ohio Legal Assistance Foundation
  4. 4. INTROS: DAN JACKSON Executive Director, NuLawLab Northeastern University School of Law
  5. 5. WHAT WE’LL COVER 1. Introduction to “User Experience” 2. Defining Your Audience 3. Understanding How They View The World 4. Getting Their Reactions 5. Ohio Legal Help Case Study 6. NuLawLab Case Study
  6. 6. WHAT IS “USER EXPERIENCE”? The sum total of your audience’s interaction. For a great user experience, your product and services should : “Meet the exact needs of the customer, without fuss or bother.” - the Neilson Norman Group How do we get there? By learning from those in our audience.
  7. 7. THINKING IT THROUGH IN THREE PARTS Defining Your Audience Who’s in the audience? What are their characteristics? Understanding How they View the World How does the audience currently do this? How do they think about it? Getting Their Reactions What do they think about things that you can actually put in front of them?
  8. 8. DEFINING YOUR AUDIENCE
  9. 9. DEFINING YOUR AUDIENCE • Who specifically is the target audience? • How many people? • What is their literacy level? Tech proficiency? • What are the general trends of their needs? • Quick conversations with SMEs • Review of existing research • Surveys of target audience • Creation of personas Key Research Questions Potential Research Methods Defining Your Audience Who is the audience? What are their characteristics ? Understandin g How they View the World How does the audience currently do this? How do they think about it? Getting Their Reactions What do they think about things that you can actually put in front of them?
  10. 10. START BY THINKING IT THROUGH Define your focus– as specifically as possible • What defines them to be part of your audience? • Who isn’t in your audience? • If you have a number of audiences, can you prioritize them?
  11. 11. IS THERE EXISTING RESEARCH? Academic research is used surprisingly little. Use it to help understand: • Demographics of your audience • Characteristics –including what others thought important to find out • Key themes
  12. 12. ANALYTICS DATA Google or social media analytics– from your own or other people’s sites– can provide an overview of demographics, interests, and behavior.
  13. 13. QUICK CONVERSATIONS WITH SMES If nothing else, talk to line staff—subject matter experts— who work directly with your target audience: • Both in a legal aid context and outside • Get an understanding of typical situations and barriers • At least three to four people Or, much better, do audience interviews, as per the next section
  14. 14. SURVEYS Surveys can be a useful way to get answers to a few questions from a lot of people. Some tips: • Surveys are harder than you may think • Unless you’re targeting a very discrete group (i.e. Arizona Bar lawyers), it’s hard to get a representative sample • They need to be written carefully
  15. 15. CREATING PERSONAS: ILLINOIS
  16. 16. CREATING PERSONAS: OHIO LEGAL HELP MATTHEW WANTS THE BIG PICTURE
  17. 17. UNDERSTANDING HOW THEY VIEW THE WORLD
  18. 18. UNDERSTANDING HOW THEY VIEW THE WORLD • What would motivate them to use the system? • What are their goals, related to the system? • How does the target audience currently achieve their related goals? • How do they think about those related processes? • What works well about their current process? What are the gaps? • Quick conversations with SMEs • Review of existing research • Interviews, focus groups, surveys with members of target audience • Creation of mental models or process flows Key Research Questions Potential Research Methods Defining Your Audience Who is the audience? What are their characteristics ? Understandin g How they View the World How does the audience currently do this? How do they think about it? Getting Their Reactions What do they think about things that you can actually put in front of them?
  19. 19. INTERVIEWS A great way to understand context. Tips: • Write out what questions you’ll ask, but make it a conversation • Start with easy questions • Think of yourself as their apprentice to understand how they think and what they do • Talk to 3-4 people for each demographic you care about
  20. 20. FOCUS GROUPS Quicker but generally not as good as interviews. Tips: • Again, write out questions but make it a conversation • Groups of 5-8 or so • Think through exercises the group can do together • Try to prevent power dynamics • Make sure to define how you’ll record the conversation
  21. 21. RECRUITING IS OFTEN THE HARD PART Make a careful plan for how you’ll recruit people for interviews or focus groups: • If your interview is short, go where the people are already • Incentives (like $10 gift card) can be a big help for low- income populations • Remember that many people will cancel appointments scheduled in advance (less if they’re in a professional capacity)
  22. 22. DEALING WITH THE DATA Statement Category 1 Category 2 “I didn’t know what to do when the landlord just changed the locks. I know they can’t do that, but I didn’t want to just call 911.” Lockout Didn’t know who to call “When he put our stuff outside because we hadn’t paid, it took awhile for us to find another place, and then we were more careful to pay the rent. Lockout No legal action [did he lock you out?] “Yes, obviously, if I cant pay, I can’t live there, and the landlord can do what he wants Lockout No legal action “There was mold on the walls. But who’s responsibility is it to take care of that, if the landlord won’t?” Safety issue Didn’t know who to call
  23. 23. THEN QUANTIFY 80% of those illegally evicted simply moved on to another housing option without taking any action. 36% specifically mentioned that they didn’t know who to contact to preserve their rights. This quantification is completely legitimate… but time consuming. Estimate the time to analyze at an hour for each interview hour.
  24. 24. OR CREATE DIAGRAMS
  25. 25. CUSTOMER JOURNEY MAPS
  26. 26. GETTING THEIR REACTIONS
  27. 27. GETTING THEIR REACTIONS • How does the audience use other people’s systems? • How do your design ideas work in real life? • How well is the target audience able to understand and use the design? • What suggestions to they have to improve the design? • Paper prototyping • User testing • Co-design sessions Key Research Questions Potential Research Methods Defining Your Audience Who is the audience? What are their characteristics ? Understandin g How they View the World How does the audience currently do this? How do they think about it? Getting Their Reactions What do they think about things that you can actually put in front of them?
  28. 28. USER TESTING BASICS One of the best ways to understand how people will respond. Tips: • Plan on 4-5 people per half-hour scenario • Script out the test carefully to try ensure a smooth test • Let them drive; ask them to think out loud • Try to give them a real scenario • Recruiting, again, may be tricky Check Out “Rocket Surgery Made Easy by Steve Krug: Usability Demo” on YouTube
  29. 29. CAPTURING THE DATA Write notes by hand in the test, but capture them electronically soon after. A spreadsheet can really help.
  30. 30. TESTING OTHER PEOPLE’S SYSTEMS Want to know how people think about something that’s been done before? It’s far easier to test something that’s already been implemented than build something yourself.
  31. 31. PAPER PROTOTYPING Or build a quick mockup in paper or prototyping tools, and test those. Test early and often!
  32. 32. FEEDBACK OR DESIGN VALIDATION If you’re planning to improve an aspect of your system, user test to understand that perspective. Or test as you build to validate that users respond to your system as expected.
  33. 33. CO-DESIGN SESSIONS A combination of focus group, design sessions, and user testing. • Bring together a number of different stakeholders– users, partners, funders, etc • Design activities to understand how they think about the subject • Ask them to sketch or create ideas • Or provide things for them to respond to
  34. 34. OHIO LEGAL HELP
  35. 35. VOICE OF THE CONSUMER SURVEY • 800 Respondents • At least 50% making $30k/year or less • Cost and confusion about the legal system were by far the biggest access hurdles • Target strategies to support Ohio Legal Help success/adoption:  Directness and Simplicity – eliminating “the use of legal mumbo jumbo.”  Cost-savings – giving users valuable, contextualized information  Security protection – respondents desired to see a reputable, trustworthy website
  36. 36. MENTAL MODEL • Maps out the thought process of a person with a legal issue through the various stages of resolving the issue • Concise way to compile a large amount of qualitative data from multiple sources • Used to develop user testing strategy • Communicates user’s perspective to outside audiences
  37. 37. USER TESTING • 23 user tests of individuals in 5 Ohio counties—a mix of urban, rural, and suburban locations • Tested four websites that are similar to our proposed site • Estimated that almost all of test subjects were at 300% of poverty or below • Only 3 male testers out of 23 • Primarily testing to evaluate the navigation and high- level design
  38. 38. LOGISTICS • 2 testers visiting 5 testing sites in 5 days • Tested at sites with walk-in services and high-volumes of clients in our target demographic (low-income Ohioans) who would expect to spend a significant amount of time waiting around (a court self-help center and community action agencies) • Offered $10 gift cards to participate in a 20-30 minute interview • At 2 sites, staff members pre-arranged some appointments, but the majority of participants were recruited on the spot by staff • Used two laptops with recording software—we had the capability to run two tests at once, but preferred to have one person run the test and the other take notes
  39. 39. TAKEAWAYS • Walmart gift cards had high value • Enlist staff in recruitment if possible • Opening lines – “what do you do?” was much less effective than “are you from around here?” • Each tester primarily tested one of two scenarios – became experts in our scripts, allowed for better recall of tests • Record notes right away • Watch yourself • Give yourself a break

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