Intro to GIS Mapping Webinar

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GIS Mapping displays data geographically. Major news publications have used it to map poverty in America, demonstrate the impact of food stamp cuts, and display election results.

Maps can also be a key tool for legal aid organizations, to help you learn more about the clients you serve and the program services you deliver. LSNTAP and LSC will host a three-part series on GIS mapping that explains what it is, provides examples from the field, and demonstrates ways to map with free software.

The first webinar will cover the basics of GIS mapping, and provide examples from legal aid organizations that are using maps for planning, communications, and program evaluation.

Time: 1 PM Eastern, Noon Central 11 AM Mountain 10 AM Pacific

Location: join.me/NTAPtraining

Speakers:

Bill Kennedy from Legal Services of Northern California

Dave Sobie from Legal Aid of North Carolina

Jonathan Pyle Philadelphia Legal Assistance

Mara Pellittieri LSC

Christina Sanabria LSC

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Intro to GIS Mapping Webinar

  1. 1. Intro to GIS Mapping April 23, 2014
  2. 2. • Why mapping data is effective – Bill Kennedy, Legal Services of Northern California • The basics of GIS – Christina Sanabria, Legal Services Corporation Agenda Why GIS, and what is it?
  3. 3. Agenda How can mapping help my organization? Examples of GIS in legal aid organizations: • Advocacy – Bill Kennedy, Legal Services of Northern California • Planning – Dave Sobie, Legal Aid of North Carolina • Assessment – Jonathan Pyle, Philadelphia Legal Assistance
  4. 4. • Experiment with a few free tools – Christina Sanabria, Legal Services Corporation • Join us for a two-part tutorial – May 14 and 21 trainings on Google Fusion Tables Agenda How can I get started?
  5. 5. Why Mapping? The Cognitive Science of Mapping and Graphic Presentations of Data Bill Kennedy, Legal Services of Northern California
  6. 6. Spatial Memory and the Brain
  7. 7. Spatial Memory and the Brain • Hippocampus is the center of “spatial memory.” • Showing data in a map gives advocates opportunity to bypass other memory centers (amygdala, entorhinal cortex). • “Re-orient” the viewer and build new memories using different parts of the brain.
  8. 8. Images can be more accessible than numbers
  9. 9. The same data, now on a map
  10. 10. It has been done for a long time W.E.B. du Bois’ map of Philadelphia’s Seventh Ward, 1899
  11. 11. GIS Basics Christina Sanabria, Legal Services Corporation
  12. 12. GIS Map = a Database with Spatial Info File containing attributes about geographies • How much/ many • What kind • When File with your data that can be mapped File containing spatial data Resource: http://www.census.gov/cgi- bin/geo/shapefiles2010/mainJoined
  13. 13. Nodes (points) 2012 LSC grantee offices Arcs (lines) NYC subway lines Polygons (shapes) Percent change in DC population 2000-2010, by Ward Data: Three Geographic Representations
  14. 14. Nodes (points) • Input: address converted to latitude and longitude coordinates • Ways to use – Color and/or shape can show type/category – Proximity can show concentration – Color and/or size can show magnitude
  15. 15. • Input: – Reference pre-existing geographies (e.g. counties) – Create your own geographies (advanced) • Ways to use – Color can show type/category or quantity – Styling (e.g. cross-hatching) can show type/cat. Polygons (shapes)
  16. 16. Layer multiple datasets to show a fuller picture Data Can be Layered
  17. 17. Mapping in Advocacy Bill Kennedy, Legal Services of Northern California Avondale Glen Elder Neighborhood Association
  18. 18. Environmental Justice • In December 2008, staff from Sacramento Natural Gas Storage Company contacted clients in a historically African American community two weeks before Christmas offering $500 cash and a $200 gasoline credit card for the mineral rights beneath their homes. • Their plan was to pump 7.5 billion cubic feet of natural gas into bedrock beneath the homes.
  19. 19. Maps in Less Than an Hour
  20. 20. Advocating against proposed closure of mental health centers
  21. 21. Potential burden on patients traveling to health centers
  22. 22. Takeaways • Maps are processed differently by the brain than written/spoken material. • Maps don’t have to be “pretty” or take a long time to be meaningful.
  23. 23. Office Location Assessment Dave Sobie, Legal Aid of North Carolina Mapping for Planning
  24. 24. Do we need an additional legal aid office in this area?
  25. 25. Why map the data? • It would help answer a specific question (“Do we need an additional legal aid office?”) • We wanted to see spatial relationships within this area. Where are the concentrated areas of poverty? For adults? Children? Seniors? Etc. • Mapping the data may raise additional questions for further inquiry.
  26. 26. Poverty in the Focus Area
  27. 27. Poverty and Clients Served in the Focus Area
  28. 28. Extreme Poverty (income <50% of FPL) in the Focus Area
  29. 29. Poverty and Clients in Richmond County
  30. 30. Poverty and Clients in Richmond County
  31. 31. Results • LANC established an office in Rockingham. • Increased number of clients from this area. • Local judges got involved and allowed LANC to do domestic violence work in neighboring county. • Reduced travel time for clients.
  32. 32. Map project advice • Create more maps than you need. • Search web for map examples and great ideas. • Check out local county/city GIS departments • Avoid trying to put too much information/data into your maps. • Create a workflow – it will save you time. • Experiment!!
  33. 33. Reaching Asian Populations in Philadelphia Jonathan Pyle, Philadelphia Legal Assistance Mapping for Assessment
  34. 34. Reaching Populations in Philadelphia Ratio of intakes to pop. in poverty, by race: Category: Intakes People Ratio Black: 5,714 201,633 0.028 White: 1,764 82,912 0.021 Hispanic: 966 74,399 0.013 Asian: 206 25,430 0.008 Sources: Intakes: Philadelphia Legal Assistance in 2013 Poverty: Census Bureau American Community Survey, 2012 5-year estimates
  35. 35. Locations of Asian social service organizations Chinatown Social service agencies
  36. 36.  Relatively large number of households  Relatively small number of households Social service agencies Number of linguistically isolated households (Asian languages)
  37. 37.  Relatively large number of households  Relatively small number of households Social service agencies Number of intakes
  38. 38. Social service agencies  Relatively large ratio  Relatively small ratio Chinatown Ratio of intakes to linguistically isolated households
  39. 39.  Relatively large ratio  Relatively small ratio Drilling down: studying potential outreach targets
  40. 40.  Relatively large ratio  Relatively small ratio Drilling down: studying potential outreach targets
  41. 41. Potential outreach partners
  42. 42. Suggested Resources • U.S. Census Bureau American FactFinder web application: – http://factfinder2.census.gov • LegalStat web application (PLA’s TIG project): – http://legalstat.philalegal.org
  43. 43. A Few Free Mapping Tools • Google Fusion Tables • Google Maps Engine Lite • Tableau Public • QGIS • ArcGIS (reduced price through TechSoup) See LRI for more information about each of these tools.
  44. 44. Thanks for Joining Us • Join us for parts two and three of the series – May 14, 1 PM ET – May 21, 1 PM ET • Contact us for additional information – Brian Rowe, brianr@nwjustice.org – Christina Sanabria, sanabriac@lsc.gov – Dave Sobie, DavidS2@legalaidnc.org – Jonathan Pyle, jpyle@philalegal.org

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