Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Copyright crash course by laura rivera

243 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Copyright crash course by laura rivera

  1. 1. Copyright Crash Course<br />Laura Rivera<br />EDTC-6340-62<br />
  2. 2. Using materials from the internet<br />Copyright law governs the use of materials you might find on the Internet, just as it governs the use of books, video or music in the analog world.<br />
  3. 3. Copyright protection<br />Once expression is committed to a tangible medium (and computer media is considered tangible), copyright protection is automatic.<br />Postings of all kinds are protected the same as published printed works.<br />
  4. 4. Implied licenses<br />Author should reasonably expect that it will be read, downloaded, printed out, forwarded, and even used as the basis for other works to some degree.<br />Boundaries are vague<br />Vital to the operation of the Internet<br />
  5. 5. Express licenses<br />Spell out in detail what rights the author of a work wants readers, viewers or listeners to have.<br />Can easily give works an express license by attaching a Creative Commons license to the materials you post.<br />Sends the message that you want your materials to be part of the flow of creativity<br />
  6. 6. Liability for posting infringing works<br />Individuals can be liable for their own actions when they copy and distribute others' copyrighted works without permission<br />Universities and libraries can be liable for the actions of their employees and students who access the Internet through their machines. <br />Universities and libraries must pay attention to what their network users are doing<br />
  7. 7. The role of fair use<br />It balances authors' rights to reasonable compensation with the public's rights to the ideas contained in copyrighted works.<br />
  8. 8. Individual liability for infringement<br />First Steps<br />Is the work protected?<br />If the work is protected, has your campus already licensed rights for you to use the work?<br />Is the work available freely on the open Web, and therefor covered by an implied license? <br />Has the owner of the work used a Creative Commons license (or similar) to give the public the right to use the work in the way that you would like to use it?<br />If you don't have express or implied rights, do you want to exercise one of the owners exclusive rights?<br />Is your use exempt or excused from liability for infringement?<br />
  9. 9. Fair use exemption <br />Coursepacks, reserves, course management systems and other platforms for distributing course content<br />Digitizing and using images and audiovisual resources for educational purposes<br />Digitizing and using other's works creatively <br />Research copies <br />
  10. 10. Four factor test for fair use<br />What is the character of the use? <br />What is the nature of the work to be used? <br />How much of the work will you use? <br />What effect would this use have on the market for the original or for permissions if the use were widespread? <br />
  11. 11. The teach act<br />Copyright law provides educators with a separate set of rights in addition to fair use, to display (show) and perform (show or play) others' works in the classroom.<br />
  12. 12. The teach act<br />An educator may show or perform any work related to the curriculum, regardless of the medium, face-to-face in the classroom.<br />There are no limits and no permission required.<br />The same educator would have to pare down the materials for distant students.<br />
  13. 13. sources<br />Harper, G. K., The Copyright Crash Course: Building on other’s creative expression. (2007). <br />This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 444 Castro Street, Suite 900, Mountain View, California, 94041, USA.<br />

×