Nebraska Biofilter CaseStudyFor more information:http://water.unl.edu/web/manure/control-emissionsCrystal Powers, Rick Sto...
Biofilters – the basics• A biofilter is a bed of organic materialwhich supports microbes that breakdown odorous gases used...
Project purpose• Demonstrate the design, construction,and monitoring an on-farm biofilter• Learn practical lessons about t...
98% o.a.f.f odor setbacksWithout biofilterWith biofilterDemonstrate odor control98% o.a.f.f. odor setbacks
Design (per room)• A biofilter was built on a 2,000 head swine finishingbarn and monitored for odor reductions and fan sta...
Construction lessons learned• Coordinate early and often with building designer:Ensure any changes are carried throughout ...
Maintenance lessons learned• Pit access must be simple• Snow drifts are heavy, so plan for extreme events• To keep the bio...
Acknowledgements• A cooperative effort of the University ofNebraska–Lincoln Extension and Porkproducer Terry O’Neel. Fundi...
Lessons Learned from the Installation and Monitoring of a Swine Finisher Biofilter in Nebraska
Lessons Learned from the Installation and Monitoring of a Swine Finisher Biofilter in Nebraska
Lessons Learned from the Installation and Monitoring of a Swine Finisher Biofilter in Nebraska
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Lessons Learned from the Installation and Monitoring of a Swine Finisher Biofilter in Nebraska

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Proceedings available at: http://www.extension.org/67675

A 1440 cu. ft. woodchip biofilter was designed and built to treat the air coming from the cool season fans of a 2,000 head swine finishing operation. Key lessons learned during construction included improvements for design coordination, materials, and labor. After installation, biofilter moisture, odor performance, and static pressures were monitored. Biofilter moisture required more sprinkling than expected, with two, one hour sprinkler runs a day not keeping up during hot, dry conditions. Dry bed conditions likely led to little effect found during odor monitoring. The biofilter does appear to filter dust quite effectively. High static pressures (>0.2 in. of water) developed more rapidly than expected and prompted closer monitoring.

Presented by: Crystal Powers

Published in: Education
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Lessons Learned from the Installation and Monitoring of a Swine Finisher Biofilter in Nebraska

  1. 1. Nebraska Biofilter CaseStudyFor more information:http://water.unl.edu/web/manure/control-emissionsCrystal Powers, Rick StowellBiological Systems EngineeringUniversity of Nebraska - Lincoln®
  2. 2. Biofilters – the basics• A biofilter is a bed of organic materialwhich supports microbes that breakdown odorous gases used on buildingswith exhaust fans• 80-95% odor reduction of air thoughbiofilter– During warm weather some air usuallybypasses the biofilter
  3. 3. Project purpose• Demonstrate the design, construction,and monitoring an on-farm biofilter• Learn practical lessons about theconstruction process• Determine maintenance needs in thefield
  4. 4. 98% o.a.f.f odor setbacksWithout biofilterWith biofilterDemonstrate odor control98% o.a.f.f. odor setbacks
  5. 5. Design (per room)• A biofilter was built on a 2,000 head swine finishingbarn and monitored for odor reductions and fan staticpressure.• Airflow: 12,000 cfm• Suggested Duct area: 30 sq ft• Critical Duct area: 12 sq ft• Empty Bed contact time: 6 sec• Media depth needed: 20” (24” installed) chippedrecycled pallets• Bed area: 720 sq ft• Costs as built: Plenum: $3,600 Beds: $5,840, Labor:$5,600, Total: $15,040
  6. 6. Construction lessons learned• Coordinate early and often with building designer:Ensure any changes are carried throughout plans,plan for electrical access from the start, and build inwater access for sprinklers• Pit fans switches should be opposite side of biofilterfor easier access and fan wiring ducts should belocated so don’t go through biofilter walls• Put gutters on the roof to limit erosion• Make sure biofilter media is clean• Ducting from fans to plenum would be great to haveas off-the-self equipment• Construction took much more time than expected:approximately 320 total hours
  7. 7. Maintenance lessons learned• Pit access must be simple• Snow drifts are heavy, so plan for extreme events• To keep the biofilter moisture in optimal ranges,sprinkling for 1 hour a day was not sufficient• Limited biofilter bed moisture limited the odorreduction, however, most of the dust was filteredout.• Static pressures on the fans increased more quicklythan expected, up to 0.35 in of water when all fanswere operational.• At high airflows, ~30% pressure is from ducting
  8. 8. Acknowledgements• A cooperative effort of the University ofNebraska–Lincoln Extension and Porkproducer Terry O’Neel. Funding tosupport this effort was provided by theNebraska Environmental Trust and theNebraska Pork Producers Association

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