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Florida, Library Media Instructional model for Literary Analysis

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  • The basic requirements of a school library media program remain the same: provide resources and services, promote reading, and teach information literacy skills. Florida’s school librarians are fortunate to have formal documents setting the standards for excellence in these major area.
  • The ExC3EL Evaluation Rubric details program responsibilities for LMSs. FINDS is a research model for students, patterned after state curriculum standards for language arts and other content areas. READS is a companion work to FINDS and provides a continuum of reading skills for each grade level. Published in 2008, READS completes the triad of frameworks which were designed to facilitate the creation of excellent library media programs for Florida’s students.Reading sores continue to lag. Various causes for lack of reading skills improvement have been explored in the professional literature ranging from disengage students, increasing populations of second language learners, to the “digital generation” theory. Consequently, the work of LMSs with reading promotion is even more critical!
  • Guiding learners to become engaged and effective users of ideas and information and to appreciate literature requires that they develop as strategic readers who can comprehend, analyze, and evaluate text in both print and digital formats. Learners must also have opportunities to read for enjoyment as well as for information. The extent to which students use information depends upon their ability to understand what they read, to integrate their understandings with what they already know, and to realize their unanswered questions. To this end, school librarians model and collaboratively teach reading comprehension strategies: assess and use background knowledge, pose and answer questions that are appropriate to the task, make predictions and inferences, determine main ideas, and monitor reading comprehension as well as the learning process.
  • EVOLUTION of READS guidelines: When SSS Reading/LA curriculum was revised in 2007, a need emerged for a means to connect the traditional reading promotion role of LMSs to state lang. arts standards. This curriculum merged reading process skills with literary analysis and response; writing; listening/speaking; and information and media literacy. …and, so, work began on a library media grade-by-grade document to provide an infrastructure for the traditional literature appreciation and reading comprehension skills needed by students.In addition to the Sunshine State Reading and Language Arts Standards, several national documents influenced the development of READS including: AASL’sStandards for the 21st-Century Learner (reflecting both inquiry/information literacy and literature appreciation) Those standards also integrated multiple literacies, including digital, visual, textual, and technological, and stressed the need for students to learn how to work in groups. The workforce requirements first described in the SCANS report and refined in the 21st Century Skills from the Partnership for 21st Century Skills were also imbedded in READS AND … Finally, the National Education Technology Standards and Performance Indicators for Students from the International Society for Technology in Education were integrated to ensure that the document would reflect the constant changes in information technologies.
  • For the last several years across the state of Florida and within our district, Library Media Specialists and classroom teachers have been using the FINDS model – Florida Research process model to teach critical thinking and research skills. The FINDS model is aligned to SSS and will be updated to align with the Common Core Standards. Now FINDS has a companion teaching model… READS. While FINDS focused on heavily on informational text and research, READS focuses on literary analysis. The Florida READS model, which will be use throughout the state by library media specialists and classroom teachers, incorporates 5 areas of literary instruction: 1) Read as a personal activity 2) Explore characteristics, history, and award of creative works 3) Analyze structure and aesthetic features of creative works 4) Develop a literary-based product 5) Score reading progress.
  • USE of READS: The skills in READS are ideal for use in LMSs’ lesson plans. The skills are written from a student’s point of view and are straight-forward, providing a clear understanding to anyone reading the plans. The use of the READS skills can provide an express lane to developing credibility with administrators and staff members. The skills are expressed in familiar language and help to demystify the work of the school LMS. In a sense, the use of defined curriculum documents validates the claims of LMSs that they are valuable teaching partners and that their efforts make significant contributions to the academic preparation of students.READS & FINDS guidelines also provide a common language for embedding library goals and activities into the culture of the school and the School Improvement Plan (SIP), the ultimate goal of LMSs. READS and FINDS support vertical articulation between grades and school levels. The use of the READS continuum of skills can also bring balance to the library media program planned and implemented in a school. Students benefit from a mix of fiction and nonfiction; vocabulary work and discussion of story elements; award-winning books and current online sources; production activities and reflection on reading progress.Through involvement in the blend and balance of activities described for each grade level in the READS document, students progress developmentally in the use of library media resources, acquisition of reading skills, and appreciation of literature and creative works.
  • The five components of the document are Read as a Personal Activity; Explore Characteristics, History, and Awards of Creative Works; Analyze Structure and Aesthetic Features of Creative Works; Develop a Literary-based Product; and Score Reading Progress. Each skill has been correlated to AASL Standards (and, now, in draft, the Common Core State Standards for Reading/Language Arts. Each component of READS begins with “the student will” paralleling the structure of the Common Core State Standards.READS formalizes, qualifies, and quantifies the valuable contributions of LMSs to the education of students. The selection of the five components is grounded in both the traditional work and current best practices of the library media profession which includes these activities: Sharing stories, introducing & exploring award winning books/media; discussing genres and history of literature and media; focusing attention on the various formats of fiction and nonfiction; analyzing literature and media to develop understanding; providing opportunities for students to react to literature and media as well as to express their creativity; introducing valuable learning resources in the community (e.g., public libraries, museums, parks); creating teachable opportunities focused on responsible use of ideas or information (e.g., intellectual property rights and legal use of information); and coordinating assessment strategies with READS and Common Core State Standards (a task LRIM is currently engaged).
  • About The Learning NetworkThe Learning Network provides teaching and learning materials and ideas based on New York Times content.Teachers can use or adapt our lessons across subject areas and levels. Students can respond to our Opinion questions, take our News Quizzes, learn the Word of the Day, try our Test Yourself questions, complete a Fill-In or read our Poetry Pairings.
  • Reads all

    1. 1. FINDS Takes a Partner: READS!<br />If you didn’t want them to think, you shouldn’t have given them library cards. –Getting Straight, 1970 film <br />
    2. 2. Shouldn’t <br />Range of essential services<br />Guiding readers<br />Support classroom instruction<br />Planning and collaboration<br />Direct teaching<br />Lesson plans<br />Collection development<br />Advocacy elements<br />
    3. 3. New AASL Resources<br />Position Statement on the School Librarian's Role in Reading<br />Reading is a foundational skill for 21st-century learners.<br />Reading skills involve thinking skills. <br />21st-century learners must become adept at determining authority and accuracy of information, and analyzing and evaluating that information to synthesize new knowledge from multiple resources.<br />School Library Media Specialist’s Role in Reading Toolkit<br />http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/aasl/aaslissues/positionstatements/roleinreading.cfm<br />
    4. 4. Essential Question<br />READS<br />How do LMSs contribute to students’ development as lifelong readers and learners?<br /><ul><li>Teaching and reinforcing literacy skills
    5. 5. Promoting reading and developing a “literate” community
    6. 6. Providing access to a wide range of resources</li></ul>http://readsresources.wikispaces.com<br />
    7. 7. Statewide reading motivational and instructional scope and sequence<br /><ul><li>Transferable – Common language/curriculum
    8. 8. From district to district
    9. 9. Within feeder patterns
    10. 10. With other educational partners
    11. 11. Formalizes instructional role – Educators
    12. 12. Curriculum development
    13. 13. Structured approach
    14. 14. Lesson plans
    15. 15. Student skills/activities
    16. 16. Merges reading agendas
    17. 17. Sunshine State Reading/Language Arts standards
    18. 18. Common Core Standards
    19. 19. AASL Student Guidelines
    20. 20. FINDS Research Process Model</li></ul>Why READS?<br />Advantages:<br /><ul><li>Scope and sequence
    21. 21. Supports the reading initiative of school and district
    22. 22. Value-added services that lead to improved student achievement</li></li></ul><li>Correlation<br />READS<br />
    23. 23. READS Component<br />Additional information<br />Ideas<br />Teaching strategies<br />Photos and clipart<br />Learning configuration: Individuals, small groups, entire class<br />LMS strengths: Knowledge of collection and student learning styles, collection development, expertise in using technology<br />LMS Support activities: Displays, bookmarks, brochures<br />LMS Instructional activities:<br />Technology integration: Webliographies, ebooks<br />Scenario:<br />Teachers send individuals and/or small groups of students to check out appropriate resources for independent reading. <br />
    24. 24. 1.1-2 Read as a personal activity – Students select resources<br />Learning configuration: Individual reading guidance<br />LMS strengths: Reads current literature (knows collection), purchases suggested/student-centered materials, understands students’ needs/interests <br />LMS Support activities: Displays, bookmarks, brochures<br />Technology integration: Webliographies, ebooks<br />Scenario:<br />Teachers send individuals and/or small groups of students to check out appropriate resources for independent reading. <br />
    25. 25. 1.1-2 Read as a personal activity – Students select resources<br />Learning configuration: Small groups and entire classes reading guidance<br />LMS strengths: Reads current literature (knows collection), purchases suggested/student-centered materials, understands students’ needs/interests, collaborates with teachers, knowledgeable about curriculum<br />LMS Support activities: Displays, bookmarks, brochures, book talks, reading aloud<br />LMS Instructional activities: Book talks, reading aloud<br />Technology integration: Webliographies, ebooks, book trailers, website posters or displays, shelfari<br />Scenario:<br />Teachers bring classes into the LMC to check out appropriate resources for independent reading. <br />
    26. 26. 1.1-2 Read as a personal activity – Students select resources<br />Learning configuration: Small groups and entire classes reading guidance<br />LMS strengths: Reads current literature (knows collection), purchases suggested/student-centered materials, understands students’ needs/interests, collaborates with teachers, knowledgeable about curriculum<br />LMS Support activities: Displays, bookmarks, brochures<br />LMS Instructional activities: Book talks, reading aloud<br />Technology integration: Webliographies, ebooks, book trailers, digital book talks, website posters or displays, shelfari<br />Scenario:<br />Teachers bring classes into the LMC to check out appropriate resources for independent reading. <br />
    27. 27. 1.1-2 Read as a personal activity – Students select resources<br />Learning configuration: Small groups and entire classes reading aloud<br />LMS strengths: Reads current literature (knows collection), purchases suggested/student-centered materials, understands students’ needs/interests, collaborates with teachers, knowledgeable about curriculum<br />LMS Support activities: Displays, bookmarks, brochures<br />LMS Instructional activities: Reading aloud<br />Technology integration: Webliographies, ebooks, book trailers, digital book talks, website posters or displays, shelfari, book lists on wiki<br />Scenario:<br />Teachers bring classes into the LMC to check out appropriate resources for independent reading. <br /><ul><li>Suggestions:
    28. 28. Reading forums
    29. 29. One Book – One School
    30. 30. Audio book collection</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>Audio books
    31. 31. Appeals to teens
    32. 32. Adaptable for learning styles or needs
    33. 33. Visually impaired students
    34. 34. ESL students
    35. 35. Reluctant readers
    36. 36. Commuting/car pooling</li></li></ul><li>1.3 Read as a personal activity – Use community resources<br />Learning configuration: Small groups and entire classes <br />LMS strengths: Works collaboratively with public and academic librarians and other local resource personnel, collaborates with teachers, knowledgeable about curriculum<br />LMS Support activities: Brochures, field trips<br />LMS Instructional activities: Lessons on public and academic library usage and/or other community resources<br />Technology integration: LMC website links to public libraries or other local community resources, webquests, virtual fieldtrips<br />Scenario:<br />Teachers bring classes into the LMC to check out appropriate resources for independent reading. <br />
    37. 37. 2.1 Explore characteristics, history, and awards – Analyze literary and media themes and genres<br />Learning configuration: Entire classes<br />LMS strengths: Collaborates with teachers, knowledgeable about curriculum, writes or uses prepared lesson plans<br />LMS Support activities: Displays, bulletin boards<br />LMS Instructional activities: Lessons on genres<br />Technology integration: LMC website links to public libraries or other local community resources, webquests, virtual fieldtrips<br />Scenario:<br />Teachers bring classes into the LMC for instruction that supports classroom curriculum and standards. <br />
    38. 38.
    39. 39. 2.1 Explore characteristics, history, and awards – Analyze literary and media themes and genres<br />Genre suggestions:<br />Booktalks<br />State reading programs<br />Curriculum-related <br />Science fiction or nonfiction<br />Historical fiction or biographies<br />Student involvement<br />Group promotions<br />Genre sorts<br />Learning configuration: Entire classes<br />LMS strengths: Collaborates with teachers, knowledgeable about curriculum, writes or uses prepared lesson plans<br />LMS Support activities: Displays, bulletin boards, flyers, brochures, bookmarks<br />LMS Instructional activities: Lessons on genres, including all formats<br />Technology integration: Digital booktalks<br />Scenario:<br />Teachers bring classes into the LMC for lessons and/or activities on genres. <br />
    40. 40. Genre: Reading Ladder<br />The Absolute True Diary <br />of a Part-time Indian<br />Woods Runner<br />Bear Walker<br />The Birchbark House<br />The Sign of the Beaver<br />Salty Pie<br />
    41. 41. 2.1 Explore characteristics, history, and awards – Analyze literary and media themes and genres<br />Learning configuration: Entire classes<br />LMS strengths: Collaborates with teachers, knowledgeable about curriculum, writes or uses prepared lesson plans<br />LMS Support activities: Displays, bulletin boards, flyers, brochures, bookmarks<br />LMS Instructional activities: Lessons on genres – critiquing, strengths/weaknesses <br />Technology integration: Documentaries, short digital segments, ebooks, e-resources<br />Scenario:<br />Teachers bring classes into the LMC for lessons and/or activities on genres. <br /><ul><li>Genre suggestions:
    42. 42. Explore informational text formats
    43. 43. Documentaries
    44. 44. YouTube or TeacherTube informational segments
    45. 45. Books
    46. 46. Internet sites
    47. 47. Picture books
    48. 48. Short stories
    49. 49. Magazines</li></li></ul><li>2.1 Explore characteristics, history, and awards – Analyze literary and media themes and genres<br />Learning configuration: Entire classes<br />LMS strengths: Collaborates with teachers, knowledgeable about curriculum, writes or uses prepared lesson plans<br />LMS Support activities: Displays, bulletin boards, flyers, brochures, bookmarks<br />LMS Instructional activities: Lessons on themes – small groups reaching consensus using short text selections or visual images (supports visual literacy skills)<br />Technology integration: Documentaries, short digital segments, ebooks, e-resources<br />Scenario:<br />Teachers bring classes into the LMC for lessons and/or activities on literary themes. <br /><ul><li>Theme suggestions:
    50. 50. Short text selections
    51. 51. Short stories
    52. 52. Songs
    53. 53. Poetry
    54. 54. Picture books
    55. 55. Visual/Media-based selections
    56. 56. Posters
    57. 57. Advertisements
    58. 58. “Memory” images
    59. 59. Documentaries</li></li></ul><li>
    60. 60. 2.2 Explore characteristics, history, and awards – Recognize social, cultural, political, and historical influences<br />Learning configuration: Entire classes<br />LMS strengths: Collaborates with teachers, knowledgeable about curriculum, writes or uses prepared lesson plans<br />LMS Support activities: Displays, bulletin boards, flyers, brochures, bookmarks<br />LMS Instructional activities: Lessons on making connections to students’ heritages; lessons on culturally and/or historically significant works<br />Technology integration: Documentaries, short digital segments, ebooks, e-resources<br />Scenario:<br />Teachers bring classes into the LMC for lessons and/or activities on culturally and historically significant works. <br /><ul><li>Cultural/historical context suggestions:
    61. 61. Finding self in stories
    62. 62. Student-centered
    63. 63. Value of other cultures
    64. 64. Background knowledge
    65. 65. Literary works focus
    66. 66. Types (folktales)
    67. 67. Classic novels
    68. 68. Documents</li></li></ul><li>Critical Thinking about Society <br /><ul><li>Class
    69. 69. Are characters treated differently because of their class?
    70. 70. What are the characters’ reactions to the class inequities?
    71. 71. Are certain classes of people portrayed more negatively than others in the book?
    72. 72. What stereotypes or prejudices do you notice regarding the social classes of the characters in the book?
    73. 73. Social Issues
    74. 74. Fairness
    75. 75. Gender
    76. 76. Race
    77. 77. Class
    78. 78. Power</li></li></ul><li>2.3 Explore characteristics, history, and awards – Appreciate literary and artistic excellence<br />Learning configuration: Entire classes<br />LMS strengths: Collaborates with teachers, knowledgeable about curriculum, writes or uses prepared lesson plans<br />LMS Support activities: Displays, bulletin boards, flyers, brochures, bookmarks<br />LMS Instructional activities: Lessons on literary or creative awards<br />Technology integration: LMC website links to award sites, digital recordings of acceptance speeches<br />Scenario:<br />Teachers bring classes into the LMC for lessons and/or activities on literary or creative awards. <br />
    79. 79. 2.3 Explore characteristics, history, and awards – Appreciate literary and artistic excellence<br />Learning configuration: Entire classes<br />LMS strengths: Collaborates with teachers, knowledgeable about curriculum, writes or uses prepared lesson plans<br />LMS Support activities: Displays, bulletin boards, flyers, brochures, bookmarks<br />LMS Instructional activities: Lessons on banned or challenged books and intellectual property rights<br />Technology integration: LMC website links to Banned Books authors and intellectual freedom organizations<br />Scenario:<br />Teachers bring classes into the LMC for lessons and/or activities on intellectual property rights. <br /><ul><li>Intellectual freedom suggestions:
    80. 80. Banned Book Week activities and lessons
    81. 81. Current issues – NPR segments
    82. 82. Equal access to resources</li></li></ul><li>
    83. 83. Book jacket art<br />3.1 Analyze structure and aesthetic features – Analyze creator’s purpose and style<br />Learning configuration: Entire classes<br />LMS strengths: Collaborates with teachers, knowledgeable about curriculum, writes or uses prepared lesson plans<br />LMS Support activities: Displays, bulletin boards, bookmarks<br />LMS Instructional activities: Lessons on making inferences and predictions about a work (supports visual literacy skills)<br />Technology integration: Book covers, recorded first paragraphs of works, Google docs, wikis<br />Scenario:<br />Teachers bring classes into the LMC for lessons and/or activities on making predictions and inferences from visuals and text. <br /><ul><li>Picture books
    84. 84. Novels</li></ul>- First lines<br />- First paragraphs<br />
    85. 85. First Lines or Paragraphs<br /><ul><li>“One minute the teacher was talking about the Civil War. And the next minute he was gone. There. Gone. No ‘poof.’ No flash of light. No explosion.” (Gone by Michael Grant)
    86. 86. The early summer sky was the color of cat vomit. (Uglies by Scott Westerfield)
    87. 87. I am fifteen years old and I’m driving a stolen car. (Stolen Car by Patrick Jones
    88. 88. Those who can, do. Those who can’t, deejay. (Revolution by Jennifer Donnelly)</li></li></ul><li>3.1 Analyze structure and aesthetic features – Analyze creator’s purpose and style<br />Learning configuration: Entire classes<br />LMS strengths: Collaborates with teachers, knowledgeable about curriculum, writes or uses prepared lesson plans<br />LMS Support activities: Word walls or displays<br />LMS Instructional activities: Lessons on use of descriptive language (types and influence on author’s style)<br />Technology integration: Google docs, wikis, vocabulary websites, word of day on LMC website or on in-house newscast<br />Scenario:<br />Teachers bring classes into the LMC for lessons and/or activities that highlight vocabulary and descriptive language as it relates to author’s style. <br />
    89. 89. 3.1 Analyze structure and aesthetic features – Analyze creator’s purpose and style<br />Learning configuration: Entire classes<br />LMS strengths: Collaborates with teachers, knowledgeable about curriculum, writes or uses prepared lesson plans<br />LMS Support activities: Displays of author studies projects, lists of titles<br />LMS Instructional activities: Lessons on researching an author and constructing an original project<br />Technology integration: Digital author study projects, digital pathfinder with links to author sites and related sites<br />Scenario:<br />Teachers bring classes into the LMC for lessons and/or activities focused on studying selected authors. <br />Author studies ideas<br />Provide access to variety of resources<br />Graphic organizers<br />Digital pathfinders with links to author’s sites and related sites<br />Bibliographies or links to book lists<br />
    90. 90. 3.2 Analyze structure and aesthetic features – Understand literary techniques and complexities<br />Learning configuration: Entire classes<br />LMS strengths: Collaborates with teachers, knowledgeable about curriculum, writes or uses prepared lesson plans<br />LMS Support activities: Displays of books with similar settings, characters, etc., bibliographies<br />LMS Instructional activities: Lessons on story elements; reader’s theater segments; literature circles <br />Technology integration: Digital images , ebooks<br />Scenario:<br />Teachers bring classes into the LMC for lessons and/or activities on story elements (e.g., historical fiction for social studies classes). <br />
    91. 91. 4.1 Develop a literary-based product – Create and share original product using appropriate format<br />Student production suggestions:<br />Book trailers<br />Podcasts<br />Posters<br />Blogs<br />Comics <br />Bookmarks<br />Original books<br />Flip camera essays or book PSAs<br />Learning configuration: Entire classes<br />LMS strengths: Collaborates with teachers, knowledgeable about curriculum and technology<br />LMS Support activities: Displays of student products<br />LMS Instructional activities: Lessons on producing products using various techniques and media<br />Technology integration: Technology presentation and production tools<br />Scenario:<br />Teachers bring classes into the LMC for lessons and/or activities on student-produced products. <br />
    92. 92. Learning “libratories”<br />Space repurposed<br />Project space<br />Design studio<br />Presentation and meeting space<br />Research development lab<br />Instruction ideas<br />Copyright ethics and legal issues<br />Scenarios, role playing, examination of copyright law<br />Bibliographic format<br />Copyright checklists<br />Production checklists <br />4.1 Develop a literary-based product – Knowledge of legal and ethical usage<br />Learning configuration: Entire classes<br />LMS strengths: Collaborates with teachers, knowledgeable about curriculum and technology<br />LMS Support activities: Displays of student products<br />LMS Instructional activities: Lessons on fair use of media resources<br />Technology integration: Technology presentation and production tools<br />Scenario:<br />Teachers bring classes into the LMC for lessons and/or activities on ethical and legal uses of copyrighted materials. <br />
    93. 93. 5.1 Score reading progress – Participation in reading motivation programs <br />Learning configuration: Individual students, small groups, entire classes<br />LMS strengths: Collaborates with teachers, knowledgeable about curriculum and technology, proponent for intellectual freedom issues<br />LMS Support activities: Displays, brochures, flyers, booktalks<br />LMS Instructional activities: Lessons on reading celebrations and independent reading programs. <br />Technology integration: LMC Internet site with links, webliographies, student blogs, podcasts, online voting<br />Scenario:<br />Teachers bring classes into the LMC for lessons and/or activities on reading celebrations and related events. <br />
    94. 94. 5.2 Score reading progress – Monitor individual reading progress – lifelong reading<br />Real world reading discussion starters:<br /><ul><li>How would I use this resource in the future?
    95. 95. Would this resource help me on the job (in college)?
    96. 96. What reading material should I know about that will help me in everyday situations?</li></ul>Learning configuration: Individual students, small groups, entire classes<br />LMS strengths: Collaborates with teachers, knowledgeable about curriculum and technology, proponent for intellectual freedom issues<br />LMS Support activities: Displays, brochures, flyers, booktalks<br />LMS Instructional activities: Lessons on reading celebrations and independent reading programs. <br />Technology integration: Technology presentation and production tools<br />Scenario:<br />Teachers bring classes into the LMC for discussions on real world applications for reading. <br />Fiction discussion starters:<br /><ul><li>Books I loved as a child.
    97. 97. People who read to me when I was little.
    98. 98. Books I loved reading in school.
    99. 99. Books I hated reading in school.
    100. 100. Literary characters I connect to.
    101. 101. Books and/or writers I am interested in, but haven’t read yet.</li></li></ul><li>
    102. 102. Questions<br />

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