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Perspectives on the evidence, value and impact of LIS research: conceptual challenges<br />Andrew Dillon<br />School of In...
MAIN POINTS<br />Major background shifts in ecology of info<br />Impact and value elusive to measure<br />Designing our ro...
BACKGROUND SHIFTS<br />Emergence of an expansive cyberinfrastructure<br />Data shift from standalone, controlled to networ...
The playing field……<br /><ul><li>More than 1.2bn Internet users,
2bn anticipated by 2015
150m adults in US use internet daily
Using Email ~ 100m
Search engine ~ 75m
Just for fun – 70m
Research ~ 21m
Watch video/music ~ 30m
40m users claim the internet is their primary source of scientific information (and 80% of these check the info for accura...
On the horizon…<br />The cell phone refusniks disappear– <br />only 15% of US adults report not owning one<br />By 2020 ma...
Shifts in sub-disciplines of information:<br />L vs. I<br />Human Factors – HCI – CSCW<br />Now they don’t talk to teach o...
Boundary confusion<br />LIS<br />Social Informatics<br />Information Science/Studies/Technology<br />Instructional/Educati...
Professions shift (inelegantly) according to cultural and social forces<br />Speed of digital development creates instabil...
<ul><li>“There has been more change in last decade than in preceding century”
    National Academies “Preparing for the Revolution” (2007)</li></li></ul><li>INFO IS PART OF WHO WE ARE<br />15,000 BC C...
MARKING OUR PROGRESS…..<br />400 AD First copyright case<br />700 AD wood block prints<br />1100 Moveable type<br />1455 G...
AND IT KEEPS GOING….<br /><ul><li>1930 first television broadcast
1937 first photocopier
1938 ballpoint pen
1941 Z3 – software based computer
1945 – As we may think published
1947 - cellular phone invented
1969 ARPANet
1993 Mosaic browser released
1999 Blackberry released
2004 Facebook launched
2005 Google print library
2007 iPhone
2010 ?</li></li></ul><li>SO WHAT?<br />Civilization shifts as information explodes<br />language, writing, printing…comput...
“Nobody reads anymore”<br />
And yet…<br />
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Perspectives on the evidence, value and impact of LIS research: conceptual challenges

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Professor Andrew Dillon's presentation "Perspectives on the evidence, value and impact of LIS research: conceptual challenges" at the LIS Research Coalition conference, British Library Conference Centre, London 28 June 2010: http://lisresearch.org/conference-2010/, hashtag #lisrc10

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Perspectives on the evidence, value and impact of LIS research: conceptual challenges

  1. 1. Perspectives on the evidence, value and impact of LIS research: conceptual challenges<br />Andrew Dillon<br />School of Information<br />University of Texas<br />
  2. 2. MAIN POINTS<br />Major background shifts in ecology of info<br />Impact and value elusive to measure<br />Designing our role around human and social responses<br />Info as the field for accelerating discovery<br />
  3. 3. BACKGROUND SHIFTS<br />Emergence of an expansive cyberinfrastructure<br />Data shift from standalone, controlled to networked, aggregated, and accessible <br />Longer-lived population of potential lifelong learners<br />More diverse educational experiences<br />Leadership gap<br />2:1 ratio of those leaving: those entering the info workforce<br />99.99% of all new data is created digitally<br />And a user population comfortable with this<br />Concerns with curation, management, access are now widespread beyond the ‘owning’ discipline<br />
  4. 4. The playing field……<br /><ul><li>More than 1.2bn Internet users,
  5. 5. 2bn anticipated by 2015
  6. 6. 150m adults in US use internet daily
  7. 7. Using Email ~ 100m
  8. 8. Search engine ~ 75m
  9. 9. Just for fun – 70m
  10. 10. Research ~ 21m
  11. 11. Watch video/music ~ 30m
  12. 12. 40m users claim the internet is their primary source of scientific information (and 80% of these check the info for accuracy)</li></ul>Pew Internet & American Life Project, 2010<br />
  13. 13. On the horizon…<br />The cell phone refusniks disappear– <br />only 15% of US adults report not owning one<br />By 2020 majority of info will be in the cloud, <br />72% of expert users anticipate this replacing their PC<br />Collection development as we know it will cease<br />Buildings won’t house collections<br />Faculty view libraries as purchasers<br />Rise of the ‘e-patient’ in all areas is likely<br />
  14. 14. Shifts in sub-disciplines of information:<br />L vs. I<br />Human Factors – HCI – CSCW<br />Now they don’t talk to teach other<br />Management Information Systems <br />Identity crisis post 2000<br />Computer Science<br />Confidence crisis in the information age (Klawe and Shneiderman 2005)<br />
  15. 15. Boundary confusion<br />LIS<br />Social Informatics<br />Information Science/Studies/Technology<br />Instructional/Educational Technology<br />Information Architecture/Policy/Management/……<br />Credentials and jurisdiction under question<br />
  16. 16.
  17. 17.
  18. 18. Professions shift (inelegantly) according to cultural and social forces<br />Speed of digital development creates instability in expertise and credentialing<br />This instability creates turf wars and fault-line thinking<br />Paper v. digital<br />Library v info<br />Us v them<br />
  19. 19. <ul><li>“There has been more change in last decade than in preceding century”
  20. 20. National Academies “Preparing for the Revolution” (2007)</li></li></ul><li>INFO IS PART OF WHO WE ARE<br />15,000 BC Cave paintings<br />3500 BC traces of early writing<br />2500 BC Library at Ebla<br />2000 BC first catalog<br />1000 BC Phoenecian alphabet formed<br />800 BC early Greek writings<br />290 BC Library of Alexandria<br />100 BC first bound books<br />
  21. 21. MARKING OUR PROGRESS…..<br />400 AD First copyright case<br />700 AD wood block prints<br />1100 Moveable type<br />1455 Gutenberg’s metal type<br />1583 first use of a digital classification system <br />1650 first daily newspaper in Leipzig<br />1714 first mechanical typewriter<br />1814 first photographs<br />1831 First electric telegraph<br />
  22. 22. AND IT KEEPS GOING….<br /><ul><li>1930 first television broadcast
  23. 23. 1937 first photocopier
  24. 24. 1938 ballpoint pen
  25. 25. 1941 Z3 – software based computer
  26. 26. 1945 – As we may think published
  27. 27. 1947 - cellular phone invented
  28. 28. 1969 ARPANet
  29. 29. 1993 Mosaic browser released
  30. 30. 1999 Blackberry released
  31. 31. 2004 Facebook launched
  32. 32. 2005 Google print library
  33. 33. 2007 iPhone
  34. 34. 2010 ?</li></li></ul><li>SO WHAT?<br />Civilization shifts as information explodes<br />language, writing, printing…computing<br />Computing moves from calculation to augmentation<br />We are at a moment of profound change in the ecology of information<br />Whose perspective on this is correct?<br />What is the LIS perspective?<br />
  35. 35. “Nobody reads anymore”<br />
  36. 36. And yet…<br />
  37. 37.
  38. 38. “we feel the ebook moment is finally here”.<br />VP of Oxford University Press, Casper Grathwohl2009<br />
  39. 39. The Gutenberg Parenthesis?<br />The last 500 years an anomaly<br />Oral culture shifted to written culture<br />Words became contained in media<br />Categorization flourished<br />But it was ‘temporary’<br />The web is a return to pre-Gutenberg orality<br />
  40. 40. The space for LIS<br />Too much emphasis on search, location, retrieval<br />Too little emphasis on longitudinal outcomes<br />Meaning has proved an elusive quality<br />Human engagement beyond target is untouched<br />Sharing (not just pointing) under appreciated<br />Large number of users for whom digital info remains non-accessible<br />
  41. 41.
  42. 42. Human Computer Inequality<br />It’s the gap not<br />the movement <br />that matters<br />
  43. 43. Truth is not tech-based<br />Three real worries: <br />A new literacy is emphasizing search over comprehension<br />We study technology at expense of humans<br />We lose the perspective of time<br />
  44. 44. The ‘literacy’ of S-R<br />Search & Retrieval: The new stimulus-response arc<br />“It is clear …new forms of “reading” are emerging as users “power browse” horizontally through titles, contents pages and abstracts going for quick wins.”. <br />60% of e-journal users (over 5 year period) view no more than three pages, and the majority never return<br />Ciber Briefing Paper, UCL, 2008 <br />
  45. 45. Speed is of limited value<br />Australia moved from a monthly calendar in reporting its balance of trade figures to a quarterly calendar because it was felt that the noise in the monthly statistics were injecting too much volatility into the price signals from financial markets.<br />Morris and Shin, 2002, The Social Value of Public Information<br />
  46. 46. What makes information valuable?<br />Friberg and Reinhardt 2009<br />A survey of 610 managers across 21 companies shows that 54% of see the biggest barrier against making good decisions is inconsistent, deficient, and incomplete information in organizations <br /> Major criteria for Info Quality:<br />Comprehensibility<br />Believability<br />Relevance<br />Timeliness<br />[Completeness]<br />
  47. 47. THE QUALITY CRUX<br />Comprehensible?<br />Timely?<br />Believable?<br />Choose any two<br />
  48. 48. Studying reputation<br />
  49. 49. Participants:100 university undergraduates (59 female)18-26 years old<br />Read/listened to introductory text (half were told about focus group)<br />Read 2 articles and evaluated their credibility (half read Article 1 as Wikipedia and Article 2 as Britannica)<br />Took a series of personality and demographic measures<br />
  50. 50. Main findings<br />
  51. 51. The information professional?<br />Any consideration of our role must include:<br />knowing, <br />designing for,<br />reinforcing better information behaviors?<br />The questions are about people, the technology is about supporting them<br />We must identify the human rules and keep them to the fore in all info system discussion<br />
  52. 52. context<br />arc of interpretation<br />data<br />users<br />mediation<br />arc of exploration<br />DATA IS STORED, INFORMATION IS EXPERIENCED<br />
  53. 53. Measuring impact<br />Evidence-based research models not well suited<br />LIS has much qualitative work<br />Hard to meta-analyze<br />The drive for ‘impact’ encourages “trendy” work<br />
  54. 54. Enabling it<br />Accelerating it<br />Retaining it<br />Providing opportunities for it<br />And designing spaces for it<br />Physical and digital <br /> Curation<br /> Organization<br />Interaction<br /> INFORMATION EXPERIENCED IN THE PURSUIT OF DISCOVERY<br />
  55. 55. THE DISCOVERY DISCIPLINE?<br /><ul><li>Foundations:
  56. 56. analysis of human learning
  57. 57. The provision of curated resources
  58. 58. The design of enabling spaces
  59. 59. the culture of open enquiry
  60. 60. It is art and science,
  61. 61. It is politics and economics
  62. 62. Its research and teaching
  63. 63. It is a social contract with our future</li></li></ul><li>INFO FACILITATES DISCOVERY THROUGH:<br />the organization and presentation of data for exploration and use<br /> the design of data-human interfaces that enable exploration<br /> the curation of data collections for quality and detail over time<br /> the examination of the value of information in the discovery process<br /> the examination of policies and procedures governing access and use<br /> the support of dynamic ecologies for learning, wherever they are!<br /> the analysis of how appropriate information access benefits a society<br /> the protection of citizens’ rights to access and share information<br />

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