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The Hybrid
Music Library
Researching User Format Preferences at
Leeds College of Music Library
Megan Dyson
@MeganDyson3
m....
Overview
About us – brief introduction to Leeds
College of Music Library
Research aims, methodology and research
design
Re...
About us
Photos
Images © Leeds College of Music, used with permission
About us
Photos
Images © Leeds College of Music, used with permission
This is our specialist music library.
That means we’...
Research aims
Investigate the hybrid music
library
Inform the Library collection
development policy
Research aims
Investigate the hybrid music
library
Inform the Library collection
development policy
“Hybrid library” descr...
Methodology
Usage data analysis
User survey
Benchmarking study
Methodology
Usage data analysis
User survey
Benchmarking study
This was an analysis of usage
data collected from our LMS a...
The idea with this research design was to fill a gap in the music
library literature by looking at both what users said th...
Convergent parallel mixed methods research design
(after Creswell, 2014, p. 220).
What users said they wanted (survey)
Wha...
Scope of the study
For various reasons,
the scope of the study
was limited to three
types of material:
scores (sheet music...
Results - Books
71% of survey respondents
preferred print books
Print and e-book collections
used at similar rates
Differe...
Results - Books
71% preferred print books
Print and e-book collections
used at similar rates
Differences in usage patterns...
Normalised book usage data: top 20% of used titles
82%
49%
Creativity & Communication e-book
Normalised book usage data: top 20% of used titles
82%
49%
Creativity & Communication e-book
This graph shows results of t...
Normalised book usage data: top 20% of used titles
82%
49%
Creativity & Communication e-book
Conclusion:
This analysis sug...
Results - Scores
63% of survey respondents
preferred printed scores; 18%
preferred online
Use of Library digital scores
wa...
Results - Scores
63% of survey respondents
preferred printed scores; 18%
preferred online
Use of Library digital scores
mi...
Results - Audio
49% preferred
online audio, 30%
physical, 16% said it
depends
CD use vastly
outstripped Library
online equ...
Results - Audio
49% preferred
online audio, 30%
physical, 16% said it
depends
CD use vastly
outstripped Library
online equ...
Overall themes from the user
survey
Overall preference for physical resources
(55%); 27% preferred online formats; 14%
sai...
Online access
26% cite physical sources
‘Accio Information!’
Broad themes of user information
behaviour from the magic wan...
Online access
26% cite physical sources
‘Accio Information!’
Broad themes of user information
behaviour from the magic wan...
Recommendations and
implications for LCoM Library
Implications for book collections
Promoting (and prescribing?) online
re...
Recommendations and
implications for LCoM Library
Implications for book collections
Promoting (and prescribing?) online
re...
Challenges / Lessons
learned
Plan, plan, plan (and plan some more…!)
Pilot your survey questions…with intended
respondents...
Challenges / Lessons
learned
Plan, plan, plan (and plan some more…!)
Pilot your survey questions…with intended
respondents...
To get in touch…
Twitter: @MeganDyson3
Email: m.dyson@lcm.ac.uk
Blog: www.notesandmarks.wordpress.com
Thanks for your inte...
References
Caperon, L. (2015) ‘Developing Adaptable, Efficient Mobile Library Services: Librarians as Enablers’, Ariadne,
...
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The Hybrid Music Library: User format preferences at Leeds College of Music Library - Megan Dyson

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Presented at LISDIS 2016, Saturday 5 November 2016 at UCL

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The Hybrid Music Library: User format preferences at Leeds College of Music Library - Megan Dyson

  1. 1. The Hybrid Music Library Researching User Format Preferences at Leeds College of Music Library Megan Dyson @MeganDyson3 m.dyson@lcm.ac.uk
  2. 2. Overview About us – brief introduction to Leeds College of Music Library Research aims, methodology and research design Results Recommendations and implications Challenges and lessons learned
  3. 3. About us Photos Images © Leeds College of Music, used with permission
  4. 4. About us Photos Images © Leeds College of Music, used with permission This is our specialist music library. That means we’ve got all the usual library stock plus printed music, CDs, LPs and also a Jazz Archive. We’re the largest conservatoire in the UK with a strong tradition of training musicians in non-Classical genres. Popular Music and Music Production are our most popular courses.
  5. 5. Research aims Investigate the hybrid music library Inform the Library collection development policy
  6. 6. Research aims Investigate the hybrid music library Inform the Library collection development policy “Hybrid library” describes nearly every library today, where there is a mix of traditional print collections and online resources, all of which you can access in an integrated way via an online catalogue. Do we need to change what we stock? Are we meeting user needs?
  7. 7. Methodology Usage data analysis User survey Benchmarking study
  8. 8. Methodology Usage data analysis User survey Benchmarking study This was an analysis of usage data collected from our LMS and online resources from the Autumn semester, Sep 2015-Jan 2016. A VERY BRIEF survey tagged on the end of our annual Library survey in Spring 2016. Compared us against other conservatoires in the UK and Ireland and placed us in the national context (I didn’t cover this in the presentation).
  9. 9. The idea with this research design was to fill a gap in the music library literature by looking at both what users said they wanted (qualitative survey data) and what they actually used (quantitative usage data), from a UK conservatoire perspective. Existing studies, all from US academic libraries, looked at one or the other (see Clark, 2013 and Knop, 2015). Research Design Convergent parallel mixed methods research design (after Creswell, 2014, p. 220)
  10. 10. Convergent parallel mixed methods research design (after Creswell, 2014, p. 220). What users said they wanted (survey) What they actually used (usage data) Here it got interesting because the two data sets did not always agree.
  11. 11. Scope of the study For various reasons, the scope of the study was limited to three types of material: scores (sheet music), books and audio.
  12. 12. Results - Books 71% of survey respondents preferred print books Print and e-book collections used at similar rates Differences in usage patterns evidenced by statistical analysis of book borrowing and e-book usage
  13. 13. Results - Books 71% preferred print books Print and e-book collections used at similar rates Differences in usage patterns evidenced by statistical analysis of book borrowing and e-book usage 27% of the print collection and 34% of the e-book collection was used over the sample period. (N.B. I know this seems low, it would likely have been better with a longer sample period, such as one academic year.) Warning: slightly intimidating graph on next slide.
  14. 14. Normalised book usage data: top 20% of used titles 82% 49% Creativity & Communication e-book
  15. 15. Normalised book usage data: top 20% of used titles 82% 49% Creativity & Communication e-book This graph shows results of the print book and e-book usage data analysis (called data normalisation) and how usage was spread across used titles. Print use was measured in issues, and e-books in section requests (cf. COUNTER, 2012). Important points: • Of the print books that were borrowed, the top 20% of issued titles accounted for 49% of the issues. • Of the e-books that were used, the top 20% of used titles accounted for 82% of the section requests; one e-book accounted for 49% of the usage (shown by shaded blue box).
  16. 16. Normalised book usage data: top 20% of used titles 82% 49% Creativity & Communication e-book Conclusion: This analysis suggests a browsing type behaviour for print books and a highly targeted use of e-books, where specific core texts are sought.
  17. 17. Results - Scores 63% of survey respondents preferred printed scores; 18% preferred online Use of Library digital scores was miniscule Classical students were super users
  18. 18. Results - Scores 63% of survey respondents preferred printed scores; 18% preferred online Use of Library digital scores miniscule Classical students were super users Classical students accounted for 57% of printed music borrowing – not a surprise since Classical music is a very notation-dependent discipline. Scores were the only clear area of agreement between survey and usage data – printed scores still reign.
  19. 19. Results - Audio 49% preferred online audio, 30% physical, 16% said it depends CD use vastly outstripped Library online equivalents Unseen use Link between subject area & format preference
  20. 20. Results - Audio 49% preferred online audio, 30% physical, 16% said it depends CD use vastly outstripped Library online equivalents Unseen use Link between subject area & format preference 22% of the CD collection vs. 0.03% of the online audio collection was used over the sample period. The caveat to what appears to be strong CD use is the probable massive use of non- Library audio resources e.g. YouTube which is ‘unseen’ by the Library About 85% of CD borrowing was from students on non-Classical courses, e.g. Production. This supports our hypotheses that LCoM’s strong tradition of non- Classical training partially explains why we are one of the only UK conservatoires with healthy CD usage.
  21. 21. Overall themes from the user survey Overall preference for physical resources (55%); 27% preferred online formats; 14% said it depends on what they’re using it for. ‘Magic wand question’ and user information needs This question has a long history of use in library research (Showers, 2015). It asks, ‘If you had a magic wand, what would be your ideal way of getting information?’
  22. 22. Online access 26% cite physical sources ‘Accio Information!’ Broad themes of user information behaviour from the magic wand question
  23. 23. Online access 26% cite physical sources ‘Accio Information!’ Broad themes of user information behaviour from the magic wand question This remains extremely important and many respondents cited some variation on an ideal ‘one- stop shop’ for information via a networked device. Somewhat in contrast to the other survey results citing overall preference for physical formats, only 26% cited this as their ideal way of getting information. Referencing the Harry Potter summoning spell, this response sums up the key concerns of 21% of respondents: they want information that is convenient, quick and easy to access. This confirms other studies’ findings (e.g. Caperon, 2015; Williams et al., 2008).
  24. 24. Recommendations and implications for LCoM Library Implications for book collections Promoting (and prescribing?) online resources Maintaining constant feedback loop
  25. 25. Recommendations and implications for LCoM Library Implications for book collections Promoting (and prescribing?) online resources Maintaining constant feedback loopThe research supports maintaining a wide- ranging print book collection which seems to be meeting user demand to browse; in contrast e- book collecting should prioritise acquiring key module texts. E-resources were underused. They need to be constantly promoted and made as user friendly as possible. Should we prescribe their use in assignments…? One study found favourable results with this approach (Clark, 2014). This research showed just how nuanced format preferences are – demonstrating the need for the library to constantly reevaluate user information needs. We should also build services around users rather than trying to keep up with every new technology.
  26. 26. Challenges / Lessons learned Plan, plan, plan (and plan some more…!) Pilot your survey questions…with intended respondents! Usage data – minefield! Comparing physical vs. online use – minefield! Unseen use online – maybe a minefield!
  27. 27. Challenges / Lessons learned Plan, plan, plan (and plan some more…!) Pilot your survey questions…with intended respondents! Usage data – minefield! Comparing physical vs. online use – minefield! Unseen use online – maybe a minefield! Self explanatory but so important! Make a Plan B for key research elements. Again self explanatory but important. From collecting, standardizing to analysis, it was a minefield. Both for our online resources and getting data from our LMS. Services like JUSP (http://jusp.mimas.ac.uk/) will make this job easier. How do you equate a print book issue to an e-book section request? No one’s found a good solution yet to this apples to oranges problem. There is likely massive amounts of unseen use of non-Library online resources. Gaining a better understanding of this will be crucial going forward.
  28. 28. To get in touch… Twitter: @MeganDyson3 Email: m.dyson@lcm.ac.uk Blog: www.notesandmarks.wordpress.com Thanks for your interest!
  29. 29. References Caperon, L. (2015) ‘Developing Adaptable, Efficient Mobile Library Services: Librarians as Enablers’, Ariadne, (73). Available at: http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue73/caperon (Accessed: 18 August 2016). Clark, J. C. (2013) ‘Format Preferences of Performing Arts Students’, The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 39(3), pp. 297–307. doi: 10.1016/j.acalib.2013.02.005. Clark, J. C. (2014) ‘Information-Seeking Behavior and Library Use by Distance Education Graduate Music Education Students’, Music Reference Services Quarterly, 17(4), pp. 207–225. doi: 10.1080/10588167.2014.965606. COUNTER (2012) ‘COUNTER Code of Practice for e-Resources, Release 4: Appendix A: Glossary of Terms’. Available at: https://www.projectcounter.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/APPA.pdf (Accessed: 2 September 2016). Creswell, J. W. (2014) Research design: qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods approaches. 4th edn. London: Sage. Knop, K. (2015) ‘Music Library Patron Material Preferences: Use and Discovery of Resources in Print and Digital Formats’, Music Reference Services Quarterly, 18(2), pp. 79–99. doi: 10.1080/10588167.2015.1030946. Showers, B. (ed.) (2015) ‘Going beyond the numbers: using qualitative research to transform the library user’s experience’, in Library analytics and metrics: using data to drive decisions and services. London: Facet, pp. 79– 111. Williams, P., Rowlands, I. and Fieldhouse, M. (2008) ‘The “Google Generation” - myths and realities about young people’s digital information behaviour’, in Nicholas, D. and Rowlands, I. (eds) Digital consumers: Reshaping the information profession. London: Facet Publishing, pp. 159–192. All images (except where noted) in the public domain from Morguefile.com and Pixabay.com

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