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The fighting forties life in and around brighouse over 70 years ago

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The fighting forties life in and around brighouse over 70 years ago

  1. 1. The Fighting Forties… Life in and around Brighouse over 70 years ago …a presentation given by Chris Helme BEM…
  2. 2. The 1940s were marked by a sense of unity and patriotism, even as thousands found themselves dispersed around the globe, serving their country with honour and distinction. When the war ended, these heroes returned home to their sweethearts, jobs, farms, and family. Although some of the old stories from the 1940s are somewhat "heavy," many are encouraging, light-hearted and rich with life lessons learned. Through this presentation I hope to capture some of those moments from yesteryear… Thank you
  3. 3. The history books tell us that the morning of Sunday the 3rd September 1939 was bright and sunny. At ten o’clock the BBC told its listeners to standby for an announcement of national importance. Every fifteen minutes listeners were told that the Prime Minister would make an announcement at eleven-fifteen. Music and a talk on "How to make the most of tinned foods" was broadcast in between, and then came the Prime minister's announcement: TRACK ONE
  4. 4. Some Local Response to the Announcement
  5. 5. The realisation of a Second World War getting even closer to Brighouse had drawn nearer in July 1938 when a Home Office van drove up Clifton Common and into Clifton. The time had come for the folks at Clifton to be shown how to fit and try their new gas masks. Whether it was a random choice or for some particular reason Brighouse along with the rest of the Calder Valley had been selected as one of a number of areas in the West Riding to implement Air Raid precautions, we don‟t know.. Why Brighouse what did it mean? This was the question many people were asking. Was Brighouse on Hitler's master plan as an area to be bombed first; was it the local industry that could be a possible target? These were just some of the reported comments and rumours doing the rounds.
  6. 6. Austere times were ahead little did people know then for just how long Two advertisements that would become very familiar during the war years – particularly when rationing began on the 8th January 1940
  7. 7. Parades through the town centre were going to be held quite often throughout the war years. This parade is in Market Street in 1940 and is winding its way to the open space where the town centre market was held and in later years was the site of the bus station and is now occupied by the Wellington Arcade properties
  8. 8. Crowds gathering for open air public meetings during times of national interest. (Left) Market Street c1940 (Right) Thornton Square c1915
  9. 9. Brighouse Police Station 1950s – this was opened in 1865 PC 747 Tom Denny was promoted to be the Sergeant at Hipperholme Police section during the war years
  10. 10. The Police Station in Police Street in an obvious state of readiness and the same scene in 1969 when it was demolished . This street was re-named Lawson Road after it was re-developed, named after Alderman Gilbert Lawson MBE who was on Brighouse Borough Council from 1929 to 1969
  11. 11. The Police Station is ready – the fast response vehicle is on standby – note all the war time notices
  12. 12. The Special Constabulary During the Second World War members of the Special Constabulary were trained to deal with a range of eventualities such as first aid, the initial co-ordination of the security at aircraft crash sites, clearing people from the vicinity of unexploded bombs, handling of unignited incendiary bombs and checking compliance with lighting regulations.
  13. 13. 1949 – a presentation ceremony at the Brighouse cricket club for the members of the Special Constabulary in Brighouse
  14. 14. Blakeborough‟s Home Guard c1940
  15. 15. Hipperholme & Lightcliffe Home Guard c1940
  16. 16. Blakeborough‟s Home Guard on Parade c1940
  17. 17. The Brighouse Air Training Corps 1943 This group of young men are members of the Brighouse ATC (Air Training Corps) with those members that are still around will now be well in to their 80s and they all played a part in bringing the Second War to an end. It was in 1938 when the Air Defence Cadet Corps was formed. Towards the end of 1940, the government realised the value of this cadet force and took control of the ADCC. It was reorganised and then renamed and on the 5th February 1941 the ATC (Air Training Corps) was officially established with King George VI as the Air Commodore-in-Chief.
  18. 18. 1942 – the boys of the 394 (Brighouse) Squadron Air Training Corps which did such wonderful work in preparing enthusiastic young men for the RAF. The commanding officer was Capt George Turner MC, the adjutant was Mr Houseman (head master at Hipperholme Grammar School) and engineering officer was Sam Warhurst. Second from the right on this photograph is John Short who was the photography officer and was a specialist photograph at A.H.Leach photography at the time.
  19. 19. New recruits and officers for the Air Training Corps c1943
  20. 20. Auxiliary Wartime Fire Brigade The Auxiliary Fire Service (AFS) was first formed in 1938 in Great Britain as part of Civil Defence Air Raid precautions. Its role was to supplement the work of brigades at local level. In this job it was hampered severely by the incompatibility of equipment used by these different brigades - most importantly the lack of a standard size of hydrant valve. The Auxiliary Fire Service and the local brigades were superseded in August 1941 by the National Fire Service. Members of the AFS were unpaid part-time volunteers, but could be called up for whole-time paid service if necessary.
  21. 21. The Auxiliary Fire Service – Hove Edge style Note the ingenuity when it came to locating a suitable vehicle as a fire engine. The HQ for the Hove Edge wartime fire service was in the barn which used to be behind The Pond public house.
  22. 22. Brighouse Volunteer First Aiders The Brighouse volunteers were connected to the St John’s Ambulance Brigade
  23. 23. Hipperholme and Lightcliffe Voluntary First Aiders The HQ for these volunteers was in the cellar of the Hipperholme Library. It was also from this cellar where local residents collected their gas masks. The air raid siren for Hipperholme was on the library roof.
  24. 24. No one was buying carpets during the war years so many of the girls at T.F.Firth’s were moved into the six storey cotton mill at Bailiff Bridge after it was taken over by G.E.C to make kit bags and other important equipment. This is the canteen that fed and watered these ladies during the war years. Some of the ladies were brought in from Coventry to manage and supervise the local girls.
  25. 25. Brighouse Town Centre of the 1940s
  26. 26. The Astoria Ballroom opened 16 February 1945 and a reported 1500 people attended. The Mayor John V. F. Bottomley C.B.E., J.P held a ‘Victory in Europe Ball’ on the 2nd of July 1945 and as far as available research shows this was held at the Astoria and went on to show a profit of just over £29. It was temporarily closed in 1949 but was finally closed in 1956
  27. 27. The Albert Cinema 1948
  28. 28. Aspects of Commercial Street Before and After 1943
  29. 29. Inside and outside Taylor’s Chemist , Commercial Street - 1943
  30. 30. Tate’s Corner at the junction of Bradford Road and King Street. A corner that was for many years occupied by the Co-op Menswear Department and is now the M&Co clothing store.
  31. 31. The first Take-Away in Brighouse The Bow Window was in Briggate and first opened as what we would term today as a Take-Away in 1864. It was originally opened by a lady known locally as „Sausage Sarah‟. In 1895 it was taken over by the Stake family and quickly became a place well known throughout the Borough of Brighouse particularly during the war years.
  32. 32. Rationing in Britain During World War II all sorts of essential and non-essential foods were rationed, as well as clothing, furniture and petrol. Why was rationing introduced? To make the British weak, the Germans tried to cut off supplies of food and other goods. German submarines attacked many of the ships that brought food to Britain. Before the war, Britain imported 55 million tons of food, a month after the war had started this figure had dropped to 12 million National Registration Day On National Registration Day on 29 September 1939, every householder had to fill in a form giving details of the people who lived in their house. How did rationing work? Using the information gathered on National Registration Day, the government issued every one with an identity card and ration book. Register with local shops Each family or individual had to register with a local supplier from whom the ration would be bought. These details were stamped in the book and you could only buy your ration from that supplier. Coupons The books contained coupons that had to be handed to or signed by the shopkeeper every time rationed goods were bought. This meant that people could only buy the amount they were allowed.
  33. 33. Those Were The Days July 1938: A Home Office van came to Clifton so residents could try on gas masks. Summer 1938: Trenches dug in Wellholme Park, The Stray and in Bramston Street Recreation Ground. September 1938: Air Raid precautions described as a shambles. July 1939: Practice in Wellholme Park for ARP volunteers. 3rd September 1939: Declaration of War January 1940: Rationing of Butter, sugar, bacon, meat and tea. 16th May to 4th June 1940: The evacuation of Dunkirk and occupation of the Channel Islands resulted in a resulted in 300 refugees and soldiers arrive in the town. Potato Pancake Cooking time: 10 – 15 minutes: 4 helpings 1 lb cooked potatoes ¼ lb sausage meat 1 dessertspoon mint and parsley chopped together 1 dessertspoon mixed herbs Salt and Pepper ½ oz Dripping Method: Mash the potato with the sausage meat, add herbs, seasoning and milk to make a soft mixture. Heat dripping and spread potato mixture to cover the bottom of the pan. Fry until brown and crisp. RATIONED RECIPES The Radio Doctor Charles Hill says: You may have heard what the greengrocer said when a critical customer asked if his vegetables contained vitamins, “If they do” he said, “They can easily be washed off”. “Well they can‟t be washed off, but they can be cooked out and that‟s a form of wastage”. After 14 years rationing finally came to an end at midnight Sunday 4th July 1954
  34. 34. Those Were The Days 1940: Three Spitfires appeared in the skies over Brighouse as part of fund raising for ‘Buy a Spitfire’. 1940: Bombs dropped in the Walterclough Valley, no one was injured except one elderly lady who broke her leg with the shock of the explosions and fell down her stairs. 1941: Women between the ages of 20 and 30 called-up. 1941: To help food rations go a bit further the first British Restaurant was opened in Park Row. 1942: Two more British Restaurants open in New Road Sunday School and Boothroyde at Rastrick. 1942: Warship Week. 1942: Blakeborough’s Male Voice Choir formed 1943: ‘Wings for Victory’ appeal raised over £500,000. More and more women were working to release more men for the war. 1944: £370,000 raised for ‘Salute a Soldier’. On Parade in Thornton Square
  35. 35. Those Were The Days September 1944: Compulsory fire watching and black-out restrictions were lifted. December 1944: Home Guard stood down. 7th May 1945: Germany surrenders – prisoners of war begin to return home. The Channel Islanders also begin returning home. 1946: Worked started on the new housing development at Stoney Lane and this was just the start of new housing programmes in the Borough. 1946: The British Legion branch decides it is time to begin raising funds for a new headquarters in the town. It would be 1957 before this was opened. March 1946: The last meals at the three British Restaurants were served. 8th June 1946: Victory Parade through Brighouse to celebrate the end of the war. This was followed by entertainments in Wellholme Park and at The Stray. Members of the Auxiliary Territorial Service (ATS), later superseded by the Women‟s Royal Army Corps, seen here on parade in Thornton Square
  36. 36. Those Were The Days 9th June 1946: Procession through Brighouse to Wellholme Park for a short Service of Praise. 1946: The Brewster Sessions reported there were 77 licensed premises in the Borough and 18 ‘Off’ licences. Gradually many were closed. 1946: Brighouse and Rastrick Band won National Brass Band finals at the Royal Albert Hall London to become the Champion Brass Band of Great Britain – the band marched through the town to Thornton Square to be greeted by the Mayor and hundreds of supporters. June 1946: Brighouse Business and Professional Women’s Club formed. February 1947: Before the war the focal point for the community was the church and chapel a new spirit of community with the introduction of Community Associations one of the first being at Smith House Estate. After the war Waring Green Chapel was in the hands of the WRCC saw it converted into a community centre. The Ambassador Radio Company Where did people hear about war news ? – newsreels at the cinema or on the wireless. Robert Noel Fitton was building and dabbling with radio sets in his attic at the age nineteen, once he had the confidence and felt it was time to try his hand at business he opened and began his first company under his own name R. N. Fitton. His first business was in a property in Bramston Street on the site of the old Ramsden Baths. In those early days he had help from his father Robert Stanley Fitton, Jack Booth who in later years went on to be in charge of the assembly department and Leonard Riach. Many will recall the company when it became The Ambassador Radio Company.
  37. 37. Those Were The Days 1948: A number of local companies decided to take a greater interest in their retired employees – Blakeborough’s being one of the early ones. With T.F.Firth’s soon to follow suit. 1948: With advancement of health developments people were now living longer which inevitably created an even high aging community. A rest room and shelter was opened in Southowram for the aged men of the community. Other organisations and facilities soon followed this new trend. 1948: A number of local companies decided to look after the interests of their retired employees June 1948: Brighouse Civic Week – Brighouse Accident Prevention Council awarded the inaugural title of Miss Marie Coates (Brighouse Girls Grammar School) the Safety First Queen. She was crowned by the Rose Queen Miss Margaret Richards. 1949: Waring Green Community Centre reported to be thriving.. By 1943 the war dominated everything, but following both Russia and America joining the fight against Hitler‟s „war machine‟, the tide was beginning to turn. In that same year a Wings for Victory appeal raised over £500,000 and in 1944 £370,000 was raised for the Salute the Soldier campaign. And then in 1945 it was all over Germany signed the unconditional surrender.
  38. 38. The War is over – Germany signs the unconditional surrender on Monday 7th May 1945
  39. 39. Brighouse in Celebratory Mood
  40. 40. Brighouse in Celebratory Mood
  41. 41. Brighouse Home Guard Band in celebratory mood at the back of the Prince of Wales (now The Ship) public house in Back Bethel Street (now West Park Street)
  42. 42. Residents in Back William Street off Gooder Lane, Rastrick also get in the mood to celebrate
  43. 43. Victory at Last – the celebratory flags are out in Larkhill Terrace off Church Lane – this street along with a section of Barton Street was demolished many years later to create the Parish Church area car park
  44. 44. Some of the folks from Hipperholme seen here at the side of the Dominion Machine Tool Company, Denholmegate Road. Like many others they too have a celebratory and commemorative photograph taken. ‘…The war is over at last…’
  45. 45. Victory in Europe – VE Day – on May 8th 1945, a day that was declared as a public holiday and although it was not the best of weather for outside celebration it did not stop the victory celebrations. VE Day was marked in Brighouse by a parade five days later with a procession from the Town Hall to Wellholme Park for a thanksgiving service this was followed by a march past outside the Ritz Cinema. The salute was taken by the Mayor Alderman J. V. F. Bottomley and Mrs Bottomley, and the senior military officer in the area Colonel R. H. Goldthorp. The celebrations were marred by the wet weather and the failure of some local organisations to take part. This photograph was taken outside the Ritz Cinema.
  46. 46. The Victory Follies – started in Clifton by Ernest Hudson This concert party was to be seen on stage many times at Sunny Vale during the war years
  47. 47. Mildred Crossley Sunny Vale was very popular throughout the war years
  48. 48. It was now time to rebuild broken communities, with many local families loosing loved ones. The sense of loss that families had experienced between 1914 – 1918 was once again felt by another generation of Brighouse residents. The town had like everywhere else to make a new start
  49. 49. The 1946 / 47 Floods (Above) Wood Street (Right) Millroyd Street
  50. 50. Post War Weather
  51. 51. Just as before the war when family life was very much centred around the local church or chapel so it was in the early years after the war. Then with many of the old communities beginning to disappeared following the new housing developments society and its needs were beginning to change.
  52. 52. The Prefabs arrived in Crowtrees Rastrick in 1946
  53. 53. The early changes to housing came in the form of the Prefabricated Houses or ‘Prefabs’ as they were known. The first ones arrived at Chapel Croft, Rastrick in 1946 and more soon followed at Whinney Hill Park.
  54. 54. Housing fit for heroes - green field sites were picked out for new housing development - Stoney Lane at Lightcliffe being one of the first .
  55. 55. People were encouraged to look at this model of the houses to be built The real thing – Fairless Avenue junction with Heathcliffe Grove
  56. 56. Houses of the Future Junction of Aysgarth Avenue looking up Fairless Avenue
  57. 57. Gradually the new housing estate began to take shape The top and bottom of Fairless Avenue
  58. 58. Nunnery Farm was swept aside for the land to be re-developed for housing
  59. 59. The vast open green spaces were also to be developed into what is now the Field Lane Estate Highfield Road with Smith Crescent Smith Crescent
  60. 60. As more an more people began to move into their new homes on the estates this inevitably saw the break-up of long standing communities 2nd Rastrick Girl Guides 1948 Most children who moved into their new community soon made new friends
  61. 61. Smith House and District Residents Association In the early post-war era the old communities that once thrived in the myriad of back to back streets were gradually being replaced with the new estates. The new residents were now being encouraged to form community associations. Smith House Estate was built between 1919 & 1921 and led the way with its community association. Seen here with the estate gala procession in 1948
  62. 62. Brighouse and Rastrick Band awarded the title of Champion Brass Band of Great Britain on Saturday 19th October 1946 and returned to a civic reception. …and some of the band’s best days were yet to come…
  63. 63. The successful 1946 band included a 16 year old Brighouse born cornet player Derek Garside. At the age of 17 he was appointed as the principal cornet of the CWS (Manchester) Band and developed into one of, if not the greatest player of his generation . Derek now aged 83 lives in the Bingley area but has not forgotten his family’s roots which are entrenched in Brighouse. I am sure that if you look amongst the crowds at this year’s Hymn and March brass band competition you will see Derek sat amongst his old friends, watching and reflecting on contesting days of the past.
  64. 64. The New Generation The war is over, whilst many have lost friends, relatives and loved ones. These are just some of the first generation of Brighouse children born after the war – a new start….
  65. 65. If you would like to read a little bit of Brighouse history I have a selection of my books available for purchase here today
  66. 66. The End The Fighting Forties – a period in history when everyone in our town and communities pulled together to over come adversity

Editor's Notes

  • Good Afternoon everyone – Welcome to my presentation :The Fighting Forties – Life in and around Brighouse over 70 years ago…We will be taking a break at 2.45pm to ensure you all have the opportunity of watching the flypast at 3pm – someone shout out if I slip past 2.45pm In this presentation I have tried to pull together as much of that period as I can in the time allowed – it would have been easy to go on for another two hours – so I will gladly take questions at the end – but then again I was born in 1950 – it should be me asking many of you the questions .
  • The 1940s were marked by a sense of unity and patriotism, even as thousands found themselves dispersed around the globe, serving their country with honour and distinction. When the war ended, these heroes returned home to their sweethearts, jobs, farms, and family. Although some of the old stories from the 1940s are somewhat "heavy," many are encouraging, light-hearted and rich with life lessons learned.Through this presentation I hope to capture some of those moments from yesteryear…Thank you
  • The history books tell us that the morning of Sunday the 3rd September 1939 was bright and sunny. At ten o’clock the BBC told its listeners to standby for an announcement of national importance. Every fifteen minutes listeners were told that the Prime Minister would make an announcement at eleven-fifteen. Music and a talk on "How to make the most of tinned foods" was broadcast in between, and then came the Prime minister's announcement: TRACK ONE RECORDING
  • Some Local Response to the Announcement
  • The realisation of a Second World War getting even closer to Brighouse had drawn nearer in July 1938 when a Home Office van drove up Clifton Common and into Clifton. The time had come for the folks at Clifton to be shown how to fit and try their new gas masks.Whether it was a random choice or for some particular reason Brighouse along with the rest of the Calder Valley had been selected as one of a number of areas in the West Riding to implement Air Raid precautions, we don’t know..Why Brighouse what did it mean? This was the question many people were asking. Was Brighouse on Hitler's master plan as an area to be bombed first; was it the local industry that could be a possible target? These were just some of the reported comments and rumours doing the rounds.
  • Austere times were ahead little did people know then for just how longTwo advertisements that would become very familiar during the war years – particularly when rationing began on the 8th January 1940
  • Parades through the town centre were going to be held quite often throughout the war years.This parade is in Market Street in 1940 and is winding its way to the open space where the town centre market was held and in later years was the site of the bus station and is now occupied by the Wellington Arcade properties
  • Crowds gathering for open air public meetings during times of national interest. (Left) Market Street c1940 (Right) Thornton Square c1915
  • Brighouse Police Station 1950s – this was opened in 1865 PC 747 Tom Denny was promoted to be the Sergeant at Hipperholme Police section during the war years
  • The Police Station in Police Street in an obvious state of readiness and the same scene in 1969 when it was demolished . This street was re-named Lawson Road after it was re-developed, named after Alderman Gilbert Lawson MBE who was on Brighouse Borough Council from 1929 to 1969
  • The Police Station is ready – the fast response vehicle is on standby – note all the war time notices
  • The Special ConstabularyDuring the Second World War members of the Special Constabulary were trained to deal with a range of eventualities such as first aid, the initial co-ordination of the security at aircraft crash sites, clearing people from the vicinity of unexploded bombs, handling of unignited incendiary bombs and checking compliance with lighting regulations.
  • 1949 – a presentation ceremony at the Brighouse cricket club for the members of the Special Constabulary in Brighouse
  • Blakeborough’s Home Guard c1940
  • Hipperholme & Lightcliffe Home Guard c1940
  • Blakeborough’s Home Guard on Parade c1940
  • The Brighouse Air Training Corps 1943This group of young men are members of the Brighouse ATC (Air Training Corps) with those members that are still around will now be well in to their 80s and they all played a part in bringing the Second War to an end. It was in 1938 when the Air Defence Cadet Corps was formed. Towards the end of 1940, the government realised the value of this cadet force and took control of the ADCC. It was reorganised and then renamed and on the 5th February 1941 the ATC (Air Training Corps) was officially established with King George VI as the Air Commodore-in-Chief.
  • 1942 – the boys of the 394 (Brighouse) Squadron Air Training Corps which did such wonderful work in preparing enthusiastic young men for the RAF. The commanding officer was Capt George Turner MC, the adjutant was Mr Houseman (head master at Hipperholme Grammar School) and engineering officer was Sam Warhurst. Second from the right on this photograph is John Short who was the photography officer and was a specialist photograph at A.H.Leach photography at the time.
  • New recruits and officers for the Air Training Corps c1943
  • The Auxiliary Fire Service (AFS) was first formed in 1938 in Great Britain as part of Civil Defence Air Raid precautions. Its role was to supplement the work of brigades at local level. In this job it was hampered severely by the incompatibility of equipment used by these different brigades - most importantly the lack of a standard size of hydrant valve. The Auxiliary Fire Service and the local brigades were superseded in August 1941 by the National Fire Service. Members of the AFS were unpaid part-time volunteers, but could be called up for whole-time paid service if necessary.
  • The Auxiliary Fire Service – Hove Edge style Note the ingenuity when it came to locating a suitable vehicle as a fire engine. The HQ for the Hove Edge wartime fire service was in the barn which used to be behind The Pond public house.
  • Brighouse Volunteer First AidersThe Brighouse volunteers were connected to the St John’s Ambulance Brigade
  • Hipperholme and Lightcliffe Voluntary First Aiders The HQ for these volunteers was in the cellar of the Hipperholme Library. It was also from this cellar where local residents collected their gas masks. The air raid siren for Hipperholme was on the library roof.
  • No one was buying carpets during the war years so many of the girls at T.F.Firth’s were moved into the six storey cotton mill at Bailiff Bridge after it was taken over by G.E.C to make kit bags and other important equipmentThis is the canteen that fed and watered these ladies during the war years.Some of the ladies were brought in from Coventry to manage and supervise the local girls.
  • Brighouse Town Centre of the 1940s
  • The Astoria Ballroom opened 16 February 1945 and a reported 1500 people attended. The Mayor John V. F. Bottomley C.B.E., J.P held a ‘Victory in Europe Ball’ on the 2nd of July 1945 and as far as available research shows this was held at the Astoria and went on to show a profit of just over £29. It was temporarily closed in 1949 but was finally closed in 1956
  • The Albert Cinema 1948
  • Aspects of Commercial StreetBefore and After 1943
  • Inside and outside Taylor’s Chemist , Commercial Street - 1943
  • Tate’s Corner at the junction of Bradford Road and King Street. A corner that was for many years occupied by the Co-op Menswear Department and is now the M&Co clothing store.
  • The first Take-Away in BrighouseThe Bow Window was in Briggate and first opened as what we would term today as a Take-Away in 1864. It was originally opened by a lady known locally as ‘Sausage Sarah’. In 1895 it was taken over by the Stake family and quickly became a place well known throughout the Borough of Brighouse particularly during the war years.
  • Rationing in BritainDuring World War II all sorts of essential and non-essential foods were rationed, as well as clothing, furniture and petrol. Why was rationing introduced?To make the British weak, the Germans tried to cut off supplies of food and other goods. German submarines attacked many of the ships that brought food to Britain. Before the war, Britain imported 55 million tons of food, a month after the war had started this figure had dropped to 12 millionNational Registration DayOn National Registration Day on 29 September 1939, every householder had to fill in a form giving details of the people who lived in their house. How did rationing work?Using the information gathered on National Registration Day, the government issued every one with an identity card and ration book.Register with local shopsEach family or individual had to register with a local supplier from whom the ration would be bought. These details were stamped in the book and you could only buy your ration from that supplier.CouponsThe books contained coupons that had to be handed to or signed by the shopkeeper every time rationed goods were bought. This meant that people could only buy the amount they were allowed.
  • RATIONED RECIPESPotato PancakeCooking time: 10 – 15 minutes: 4 helpings1 lb cooked potatoes¼ lb sausage meat1 dessertspoon mint and parsley chopped together1 dessertspoon mixed herbsSalt and Pepper½ oz DrippingMethod: Mash the potato with the sausage meat, add herbs, seasoning and milk to make a soft mixture. Heat dripping and spread potato mixture to cover the bottom of the pan. Fry until brown and crisp.The Radio Doctor Charles Hill says: You may have heard what the greengrocer said when a critical customer asked if his vegetables contained vitamins, “If they do” he said, “They can easily be washed off”. “Well they can’t be washed off, but they can be cooked out and that’s a form of wastage”.
  • On Parade in Thornton Square
  • Members of the Auxiliary Territorial Service (ATS), later superseded by the Women’s Royal Army Corps, seen here on parade in Thornton Square
  • The Ambassador Radio CompanyWhere did people hear about war news ? – newsreels at the cinema or on the wireless. Robert Noel Fitton was building and dabbling with radio sets in his attic at the age nineteen, once he had the confidence and felt it was time to try his hand at business he opened and began his first company under his own name R. N. Fitton. His first business was in a property in Bramston Street on the site of the old Ramsden Baths. In those early days he had help from his father Robert Stanley Fitton, Jack Booth who in later years went on to be in charge of the assembly department and Leonard Riach. Many will recall the company when it became The Ambassador Radio Company.
  • By 1943 the war dominated everything, but following both Russia and America joining the fight against Hitler’s ‘war machine’, the tide was beginning to turn.In that same year a Wings for Victory appeal raised over £500,000 and in 1944 £370,000 was raised for the Salute the Soldier campaign. And then in 1945 it was all over Germany signed the unconditional surrender.
  • The War is over – Germany signs the unconditional surrender on Monday 7th May 1945
  • Brighouse in Celebratory Mood
  • Brighouse in Celebratory Mood
  • Brighouse Home Guard Band in celebratory mood at the back of the Prince of Wales (now The Ship) public house in Back Bethel Street (now West Park Street)
  • Residents in Back William Street off Gooder Lane, Rastrick also get in the mood to celebrate
  • Victory at Last – the celebratory flags are out in Larkhill Terrace off Church Lane – this street along with a section of Barton Street was demolished many years later to create the Parish Church area car park
  • Some of the folks from Hipperholme seen here at the side of the Dominion Machine Tool Company, Denholmegate Road. Like many others they too have a celebratory and commemorative photograph taken.‘…The war is over at last…’
  • Victory in Europe – VE Day – on May 8th 1945, a day that was declared as a public holiday and although it was not the best of weather for outside celebration it did not stop the victory celebrations. VE Day was marked in Brighouse by a parade five days later with a procession from the Town Hall to Wellholme Park for a thanksgiving service this was followed by a march past outside the Ritz Cinema. The salute was taken by the Mayor Alderman J. V. F. Bottomley and Mrs Bottomley, and the senior military officer in the area Colonel R. H. Goldthorp. The celebrations were marred by the wet weather and the failure of some local organisations to take part. This photograph was taken outside the Ritz Cinema.
  • The Victory Follies – started in Clifton by Ernest HudsonThis concert party was to be seen on stage many times at Sunny Vale during the war years
  • Sunny Vale was very popular throughout the war yearsMildred Crossley
  • It was now time to rebuild broken communities, with many local families loosing loved ones. The sense of loss that families had experienced between 1914 – 1918 was once again felt by another generation of Brighouse residents.The town had like everywhere else to make a new start
  • The 1946 / 47 Floods(Above) Wood Street(Right) Millroyd Street
  • Post War Weather
  • Just as before the war when family life was very much centred around the local church or chapel so it was in the early years after the war. Then with many of the old communities beginning to disappeared following the new housing developments society and its needs were beginning to change.
  • The Prefabs arrived in Crowtrees Rastrick in 1946
  • The early changes to housing came in the form of the Prefabricated Houses or ‘Prefabs’ as they were known. The first ones arrived at Chapel Croft, Rastrick in 1946 and more soon followed at Whinney Hill Park.
  • Housing fit for heroes - green field sites were picked out for new housing development - Stoney Lane at Lightcliffe being one of the first .
  • People were encouraged to look at this model of the houses to be built The real thing – Fairless Avenue junction with Heathcliffe Grove
  • Houses of the FutureJunction of Aysgarth Avenue looking up Fairless Avenue
  • Gradually the new housing estate began to take shapeThe top and bottom of Fairless Avenue
  • Nunnery Farm was swept aside for the land to be re-developed for housing
  • The vast open green spaces were also to be developed into what is now the Field Lane EstateSmith Crescent Highfield Road with Smith Crescent
  • As more an more people began to move into their new homes on the estates this inevitably saw the break-up of long standing communities2nd Rastrick Girl Guides 1948Most children who moved into their new community soon made new friends
  • Smith House and District Residents Association In the early post-war era the old communities that once thrived in the myriad of back to back streets were gradually being replaced with the new estates. The new residents were now being encouraged to form community associations. Smith House Estate was built between 1919 & 1921 and led the way with its community association. Seen here with the estate gala procession in 1948
  • Brighouse and Rastrick Band awarded the title of Champion Brass Band of Great Britain on Saturday 19th October 1946 and returned to a civic reception. …and some of the band’s best days were yet to come…
  • The successful 1946 band included a 16 year old Brighouse born cornet player Derek Garside. At the age of 17 he was appointed as the principal cornet of the CWS (Manchester) Band and developed into one of, if not the greatest player of his generation . Derek now aged 83 lives in the Bingley area but has not forgotten his family’s roots which are entrenched in Brighouse. I am sure that if you look amongst the crowds at this year’s Hymn and March brass band competition you will see Derek sat amongst his old friends, watching and reflecting on contesting days of the past.
  • The New GenerationThe war is over, whilst many have lost friends, relatives and loved ones. These are just some of the first generation of Brighouse children born after the war – a new start….
  • If you would like to read a little bit of Brighouse history I have a selection of my books available for purchase here today
  • The Fighting Forties – a period in history when everyone in our town and communities pulled together to over come adversityThe End

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