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Loneliness data pilots la briefing workshop 190123

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The LGA in partnership with DCMS, Cabinet Office and MHCLG is developing a project to run in FY 2019-20 to run a small series of pilot areas that identify, collect, standardise format and publish data about their local and hyper local services that are helpful in tackling "loneliness". This forms one part of the cross-government initiative on loneliness that was first announced in 2018.

This is a PowerPoint presentation (large 7Mb) that was used to deliver a briefing workshop at the LGA for interested pilot participants on 23-Jan-2019. A smaller pdf version of this presentation is available on the File Exchange too.

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Loneliness data pilots la briefing workshop 190123

  1. 1. Preparing & discovering local service data Introduction, background, vision Tim Adams Programme Manager (LGA) @DrTimAdams January 2019 www.local.gov.uk/lginformplus
  2. 2. www.local.gov.uk/lginformplus@LGInformPlus The issues • Do we know what is out there? • Difficult to collect • Unreliable data • Diversity: 350 councils & 1000s of partners • Unable to work across boundaries • Hard to discover and re-use
  3. 3. www.local.gov.uk/lginformplus@LGInformPlus The solution • Make use of the crowd • Use standard schema • Develop data collection guidelines • Align with national taxonomy • Use a consistent means of publication
  4. 4. www.local.gov.uk/lginformplus@LGInformPlus The benefits • Frontline can use reliable data to raise awareness of preventative services • Easier data discovery • Geographical and organisational boundaries cease to exist • Efficiency and effectiveness of data collection improved
  5. 5. www.local.gov.uk/lginformplus@LGInformPlus The legacy: LG information standards standards.esd.org.uk
  6. 6. www.local.gov.uk/lginformplus@LGInformPlus The local government business model standards.esd.org.uk/LGBM
  7. 7. www.local.gov.uk/lginformplus@LGInformPlus Progress • We have completed: - Local service schema (Paul will explain) - Taxonomy of needs and circumstances (Nicki will explain) - Product backlog for collection software (Ian will explain) - Initial trials in NW region & now in Bristol (Beccy will explain) • We are completing - software development (Jan-Mar) - existing data migration (Jan-Mar) - exploring data consumers (Jan–Mar: NHS 111, CCG, ADL, SPEAR, Housing, Loneliness app, Need assessment)
  8. 8. www.local.gov.uk/lginformplus@LGInformPlus Next step • Prove it on the frontline: -Organisations can align to the taxonomy -Organisations will adopt the service description standard (or migrations) -Data collection can be streamlined across the place -Frontline organisations and applications will consume the created data e.g. loneliness initiatives
  9. 9. www.local.gov.uk/lginformplus@LGInformPlus Further work • This is only step one as we know we have to do more but that will come after we prove this. -Taxonomy helper & publication tools -Service quality (gatekeeper) -Consider a Booking platform -Usage metrics -Rating -Look at gaps and over capacity in an area
  10. 10. Place-based Directory of Service Background info January 2019
  11. 11. Directory of Service • A Directory of Services seeks to empower ‘prevention’ through knowledge of support services • However we need to work as a ‘place’ to gain the full benefits Self-help Family & friends Early intervention/ Prevention/ Long term condition Management Aiming to help people help themselves ££££ Statutory Services • Adult social care • GP appointments • A&E admissions • Mental health • Debts (non-payment) £££ Carers, advocacy & befriending ££ £ – which in turn increases Quality of Life
  12. 12. What’s the Problem • Too many Service Directories • Costly to maintain • Duplication • Can’t rely on the data • Confusing rather than helpful to the frontline
  13. 13. • Work as a place to ‘prepare the data’ once then allow people to ‘consume many’ times: • collect the service information once but use many sources • tag services consistently across the place based on personal situation e.g. strengths, aspirations, issues, needs, circumstances • pay a custodian to assure the data on behalf of the place • aggregate the services into a place directory • feed the data to those that have a frontline purpose for it and, likely, a target audience • This will stimulate the market for more and better applications to use the reliable place data • The end result should be better support for citizens and reduced costs for the public sector What’s the solution?
  14. 14. Solution analogy – National rail service data NRE Data Feeds National Rail Enquiries (NRE) support the principle of transparency and contribute to the wider industry agenda by making data openly available in the public domain. NRE have a selection of APIs and XML feeds that are available for use by third party developers to create their own applications. The data feeds are derived from our three primary engines; Darwin, KB and OJP.
  15. 15. IN SCOPE Citizen needing support Frontline applications Place Directory Digital Place Directory of Service Live Well Directory of Services I Worry App Council A voice for victims of crime & ASB Housing tenant support
  16. 16. What are the benefits? 1. Savings • Cheaper to collect once (and pay custodian) • Possibility to generate income from making data available to apps • Public sector may not need to develop apps themselves 2. Quality of service • Data can be relied upon • Services can be aggregated (no admin/geography boundaries) 3. Productivity • Frontline workers should be able to find services more easily • Citizens should be able to help themselves more 4. Strategic • Can better understand supply & demand • Should be easier to monitor what works
  17. 17. Further benefits? Once a place has hyper-local service information available then a number of benefits become possible: • Social prescribing • 50% of patients attending GP surgeries need non-clinical services. • GP practices need to know what services are out there so that they can ‘socially prescribe’ • Prevention • empower citizens, family, friends, carers, charities to access support services to avoid crisis and statutory services • Homelessness • once in a home an ex-homeless person is likely to move on when a problem comes up. • More likely to stay if embedded in local support and community activity so homelessness support want to know what’s out there • Loneliness • befrienders are capable of bringing people out of loneliness by embedding them in the local community but they need to know what community activities exist
  18. 18. What are the risks? • Existing data will need migrating into LGA standard • Existing applications will need application changing • No-one may be interested in consuming the data they’ve not collected • There might be competition to be an assurer • People may not be prepared to pay others to assure • Expectations of ‘perfect’ data may be raised • More awareness will risk services not coping with demand • Quality of the service is not assured and left with application providers
  19. 19. Outline business case The business case is predicated on the fact that collecting, tagging and assuring the service information once is the most efficient way of working. It has been estimated that collecting, tagging and assuring a service costs approximately £30 per annum. A large council might have 10,000 services in their directories and therefore if only one other organisation in the place/area duplicated 50% of this work that would waste £150,000. Having accountable assurer(s) to the whole place who are adequately resourced will enable many organisations to have access to aggregated data that they can rely on to support residents/citizens on a prevention agenda. This is likely to maximise early intervention and support and thereby minimising the demand on statutory services.
  20. 20. Costs to maintain service info over 3 years Step Notes Year Duration Worker hourly rate Expenses Frequency for one service per year Costs for one service per year Initial call Could take a few calls to get through 1 15mins £7.50 10p per call 1 £2 Initial email Could take some time to find email 1 15mins £7.50 None 1 £2 Assurance visit Unknown organisation may need a visit 1 3 hours £9 Travel costs 1 £35 Identify service information error Could mean dealing with email or phone call or frontline 2 15 mins £7.50 None 2 £4 Add service information 1,2 15 mins £7.50 2 £4 Amend service information 2,3 30 mins £7.50 3 £12 Improvement visit Looking to improve their service, maybe become a social prescription etc 3 3 hours £12 Travel costs 1 £45 £104
  21. 21. An example business case Income & Expenditure assuming 10,000 services paying assurer £5 per service Unit Unit cost Amount A custodian e.g. AgeUK, Citizen Advice, CVS could be paid to assure each service. 10,000 £10 - £100,000 A data consumer could be charged to receive the assured data that they need. Note – it is cheaper to contribute to a central place-based data collection than have your own team doing it. - Housing 5000 £5 £25,000 - Police 5000 £5 £25,000 - Fire 5000 £5 £25,000 - Charity/Voluntary/Not for profits x 4 (many) 5000 £1 £20,000 - NHS 111 5000 £5 £25,000 - API license to private sector x 10 (many) 1000 £10 £100,000 There may be a license charge to use the place-based software system as part of national infrastructure 1 £20,000 - £42,000 Programme management - £50,000 Balance +£28,000
  22. 22. Bristol’s Aim Maintain a single reliable place-based directory of hyper-local services which can feed the service data to many frontline applications seeking to help people and frontline professionals find appropriate support services.
  23. 23. Conceptual Model Service User Citizen, Carer, Professional AssurerService ProviderVolunteer data collector Service Data Consumer HOMELESS SUPPORT Data assurance partner Service Data Consumer AGE UK Service Data Consumer WELL AWARE Service Data Consumer LONELINESS APP Service Data Consumer SOCIAL PRESCRIBING Data is collected, tagged and assured once on behalf of the place Place Administrator Governs the configuration of the place i.e. assurance definition, meta tags Bulk Service data provider Contributes a larger list of services collected by another means Service Data Consumer NHS 111 The hyper-local services data is made available to many frontline application for them to use it for their own purposes Citizens, carers and frontline workers can choose which application they want to use Data Quality Assured Local Services Directory
  24. 24. Conceptual Model Service User Citizen, Carer, Professional AssurerService ProviderVolunteer data collector Service Data Consumer HOMELESS SUPPORT Data assurance partner Data Quality Assured Local Services Directory Service Data Consumer AGE UK Service Data Consumer WELL AWARE Service Data Consumer LONELINESS APP Service Data Consumer SOCIAL PRESCRIBING Data is collected, tagged and assured once on behalf of the place Place Administrator Governs the configuration of the place i.e. assurance definition, meta tags Bulk Service data provider Contributes a larger list of services collected by another means Service Data Consumer NHS 111 The hyper-local services data is made available to many frontline application for them to use it for their own purposes Citizens, carers and frontline workers can choose which application they want to use
  25. 25. Thank you Any Questions ian.singleton@digitalgaps.co.uk Providing capacity & capability to bridge your digital gaps
  26. 26. The loneliness cross government initiative The perspective from DCMS Olivia Field Dept. of Digital, Culture, Media & Sport @oliviamayafield January 2019
  27. 27. Case Study: Bristol Beccy Wardle Director of Individual Services, The Care Forum
  28. 28. Background • WellAware – web based searchable directory of local and hyper local services relating to health and wellbeing • Years of delivery means we have learned what the challenges are
  29. 29. Is it comprehensive? • You don’t know what you don’t know • Custodian/assurer role must be embedded in the VCSE sector • It’s about relationships - ‘two way’ • Don’t forget the hyper-local – experience shows us these are the ones that make a real difference to loneliness
  30. 30. Is it up to date? • One of the biggest challenges! • It’s a very quickly changing landscape • Data is only meaningful to support loneliness (or any need) if it is maintained • The ideal – that services take ownership (but the reality is slightly different) • Importance of resourcing assurance
  31. 31. Geographic boundaries • People don’t think about local authority areas • CCG – STP – WECA • People want to find information based on needs/circumstances/eligibility
  32. 32. Multiple directories • NHS – Mental Health Charities – older people – DWP – localities (and more) • Very quickly out of date • Confusing
  33. 33. Bristol – PBDoS Partnership - BCC/WellAware • LGA/iStandUK – mapping existing data • Develop relationships across the place • Software – collect/assure/tag (PFIKS)
  34. 34. Bristol Next Steps… • MVP – end of March 2019 • Continue work with LGA on the standard • Migrate existing data • Test and use the software • Data published on Bristol Open Data Platform • Continue work with neighbouring authorities
  35. 35. Publishing Service Information using a Standard Schema LGA Loneliness Pilots January 2019 36 Paul Davidson, CIO Sedgemoor District Council Director of Standards for iStandUK
  36. 36. Introduction to iStandUK • Operating since 2006 – Formerly known as LeGSB – All personnel are employees of local authorities, and central government departments. – Board representatives from DCLG, DWP, LGA, SOCITM, NHS Digital, Government Digital Service, Various Councils. • Funded by Central Government Departments – currently – Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) – Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) – Projects with LGA • Mission – To promote Standards for Efficiency, Transformation, and Transparency of Local Services – Bridging the Information Gap • http://www.iStandUK.org 37
  37. 37. Requirements and Approach • A standard format to describe locally delivered services. • Enough information for person to judge if a service is relevant to their needs. • Part of the family of data formats developed and supported by the LGA’s transparency programme. • Derived from existing standards. • Learning from suppliers, and local authorities. • The pilots will bring content together using the LGA’s Locally Delivered Services Schema and an ‘application profile’ that fits ‘loneliness’ – so that it is republish-able to other standards, and reaches a wider audience. 38
  38. 38. Scope • Central Government Services that are accessed locally. • Commercial wider than social care (gardening, handyperson, cleaning) • Advice – financial, making good buying decisions, volunteering and other ways to take part in your community. 39
  39. 39. Related Data Standards • Smart City Concept Model – http://www.smartcityconceptmode.com • schema.org - http://schema.org/ • open311 - http://www.open311.org/ • openReferral - https://openreferral.org/ • Local Links - http://www.localdigitalcoalition.uk/links-support/ • European Community ‘SERVICE’ core vocabulary - https://joinup.ec.europa.eu/catalogue/distribution/cpsv-documentation-pdf • OpenReferral - https://openreferral.org/ 40
  40. 40. A look at the schema • Guidance document – https://docs.google.com/do cument/d/1PmltkDwjocYsIi 5Lv_0uWRZMhH-EU3t- h1cFg9swa_c/edit?usp=sh aring • LGA’s Schema Validator - http://beta.validator.opendat a.esd.org.uk/servicedirector yschema 41
  41. 41. Concept Model 42
  42. 42. Examples 43
  43. 43. Examples 44
  44. 44. Local Services for Loneliness • Live Events – Leaving Care – Becoming Homeless – Becoming a Parent – Living in an Abusive Environment – Bullying – Being a Victim of Crime – Children Leaving Home – Retirement – Moving into Care – Divorce / Relationship breakdown – Living with a Disability 45 • What Works? – What type of local service is relevant to what trigger for Loneliness?
  45. 45. Thank you 46 - Paul Davidson - paul.davidson@sedgemoor.gov.uk - Director of Standards for iStandUK - http://www.iStandUK.org
  46. 46. Taxonomies for a local Service Catalogue Nicki Gill / Mike Thacker http://esd.org.uk/standards LG Inform Plus
  47. 47. Document type Process Organisation type Power/Duty Function Need Circumstance Metric Service Record classification Channel type Interaction type Legislation Life event Contains Has subject Changes Addresses Allows/ Requires Confers Confers on Has Same as Performs Is part of Defines eligibility for Conducted via Delivered via Implies preference for Grouped by People and places Organisation scope Organisation Web menu structure Accessed from Retention defined by Local Government Business Model (LGBM) © esd-toolkit 2009 Diagram may be re-used subject to crediting the source as esd-toolkit Determines Has Local Government Business Model Issues and benefits Defines Has subject Arises from
  48. 48. esd-standards - Taxonomies
  49. 49. LGSL - Service types
  50. 50. Needs (draft)
  51. 51. Needs - Social inclusion
  52. 52. Needs mapped to service types
  53. 53. Circumstances
  54. 54. Addressed byService type e.g. Fishing Circumstance types e.g. Female, Wheelchair user Circumstance types e.g. Female Types of Need e.g. Hobbies and interests Life events e.g. Bereavement Has Has Defines eligibility for Has Has Specific circumstances e.g. 58 years old, BS8 1RL Filter services by 1. service types meeting the customer’s 2. need 2. eligibility criteria 3. geographical location where relevant ChangesChanges Service e.g. Avon women anglers Customer
  55. 55. Wider discussion Implementation Plan, Risks, Success Criteria The LGA Team and its Partners January 2019
  56. 56. www.local.gov.uk/lginformplus@LGInformPlus Outcomes • Frontline applications with access to reliable hyper-local data • Savings from public sector spend on data collection • Ability to aggregate data across organisational and geographical boundaries
  57. 57. www.local.gov.uk/lginformplus@LGInformPlus Objectives • Adoption of service schema • Local categories aligned to national taxonomy • Data migration paths from and to existing repositories • Assurance levels agreed • Assurers working together across the place • Applications consuming the hyper-local data • Frontline workers contributing to data collection and maintenance
  58. 58. www.local.gov.uk/lginformplus@LGInformPlus Outputs • Hyper-local data set • Refined service schema – service types • Refined need & circumstance taxonomy • Lessons learned report
  59. 59. Implementation – Key steps 1. Discover existing data sources and potential data consumers 2. Adopt the LGA local service schema 3. Map place categories against LGA taxonomy 4. Decide how the data will be consumed 5. Identify software to collect data including migrations 6. Agree the level of assurance required 7. Obtain expressions of interest from assurers with a service scope 8. Consider what management information will be collected 9. Pilot the collection, consumption and application usage in a locality 10. Go live across the place
  60. 60. Risks • Existing data will need migrating into LGA standard • Existing applications will need application changing • No-one may be interested in consuming the data they’ve not collected • There might be competition to be an assurer • People may not be prepared to pay others to assure • Expectations of ‘perfect’ data may be raised • More awareness will risk services not coping with demand • Quality of the service is not assured and left with application providers
  61. 61. Questions & Answer Session
  62. 62. User story groupings/epics • Finding a service • Collecting and maintaining service data • Assuring data quality • Informing of service quality • Consuming service data • Accessing services • Referring services
  63. 63. Assurance levels • How regular is it ‘assured’ • Which fields are mandatory • SLA on receiving an error report • Completion of ‘heads up’ response/check (will be here next quarter) • Record confidence factors for exception reporting • Last logged in/ last assurance visit • Last updated service • Quality mark within recent time • Number of errors over last 12 months • Time allowed on warning after failed assurance
  64. 64. Pilot • Outcomes • Objectives • Timelines • Outputs • Success indicators
  65. 65. Timelines • Programme starts: • Pilot projects initiated – • Pilots set up • Pilots run • Pilots reviewed • Programme concludes
  66. 66. Success indicators • Inclusion of place partners • % of services in service schema format • Number of interested consumers

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