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Wired-wireless or both - Presented by Ross Eberlin

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Course Description: The course defines “Advanced Lighting Controls” and its deployment methods:, ”Wired”, “Wireless” or “Hybrid”. Other benefits of Advanced Lighting Controls such as how it benefits in the construction of “green” or “high performance building” are also discussed. Building owners, architects, engineers and building system specifiers are then introduced to the “cons” & “pros” associated with wired/wireless implementations. The course ends by showing system architectures that implement wired, wireless or hybrid type of lighting controls regardless of the protocols implemented. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to: a. Define “Wired”, “Wireless” and “Hybrid” Lighting Controls; b. Identify the “cons” and “pros” associated with wired/wireless implementations; c. Evaluate the technologies & strategies that drive different implementations; d. Analyze system architectures that implement wired, wireless or hybrid type of lighting controls. Presented by Ross Eberlin
Product Marketing Manager, OSRAM Sylvania - ENCELIUM

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Wired-wireless or both - Presented by Ross Eberlin

  1. 1. Credit(s) earned on completion of this course will be reported to AIA CES for AIA members. Certificates of Completion for both AIA members and non-AIA members are available upon request. This course is registered with AIA CES for continuing professional education. As such, it does not include content that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or endorsement by the AIA of any material of construction or any method or manner of handling, using, distributing, or dealing in any material or product. ___________________________________________ Questions related to specific materials, methods, and services will be addressed at the conclusion of this presentation.
  2. 2. Ross Eberlin Product Marketing Manager OSRAM SYLVANIA
  3. 3.  Advanced Lighting Controls utilize various strategies and GUI based controls to achieve energy savings while ensuring comfortable & safe work environment for building occupants. These intelligent controls can be deployed via “Wired”, “Wireless” or “Hybrid” methods. Deployment methods are typically influenced by building type, labor costs, ROI considerations, etc.
  4. 4.  Justify the importance of “Intelligent lighting controls”  Define “Wired”, “Wireless” and “Hybrid” Lighting Controls  Identify the “pros” and “cons” associated with wired/wireless implementations  Evaluate the technologies & strategies that drive different implementations  Analyze system architectures that implement wired, wireless or hybrid type of lighting controls
  5. 5. Definition & Benefits
  6. 6.  Allow modification of light levels depending on specific tasks, individual preferences, through hand-held device/s or computer  Provide addressable control of each light fixture controlled through front end software  Embedded (software/hardware architectures) systems enable individual fixture controllability by assigning it with a unique address.  Permit automatic switch on, off or dim capabilities based on photo/occupancy sensor inputs or time schedule  Optimize energy consumption by self-monitoring room occupancy and adjusting light to suit occupancy status  With virtually accurate information about occupancy status in a building, lighting control can provide valuable information for integration with BMS systems, and further enhance the functionality of the BMS systems.  Perform load shedding to reduce demand charges or overall building consumption in response to energy price spikes
  7. 7.  Improve the return on investment (ROI)  Energy savings  Code compliance  Sustainable building practices  Convenience to building managers, as well as occupants  Safety and security for occupants and visitors  More flexibility in controlling lighting throughout the space
  8. 8. Major Characteristics
  9. 9.  Occupancy Control  Smart Time Scheduling  Task Tuning  Variable Load Shedding  Personal Control  Daylight Harvesting
  10. 10. 11  An example illustrating the Graphical User Interface (GUI) for an “Addressable Lighting Control System”. Lights ON Lights OFFOccupancy Sensor: Space not occupied Lights ON due to time delay
  11. 11. 12  Energy reporting, Scheduling events, Create/change events, BAS (BACnet) integration, etc.
  12. 12.  A smart building is an intelligent space that optimizes efficiency, comfort, safety and asset performance within the building.  Coordinating the performance of multiple BASs not only save energy, but also maintain comfort in a way that optimizing each system separately could not.  The evolution of Internet of Things (IoT) and its ability to connect devices to the cloud is expected to lower the cost of instrument building with sensors.  IoT offers cloud-based data analytics. 13 Ethernet or Fiber backbone Distributed, but Coordinated Monitoring & Control Source : IBM Corporation
  13. 13. Technology & Architecture
  14. 14. Low voltage digital  Sometimes referred to as 4-wire dimming - uses two low-voltage, polarity-sensitive conductors to provide a dimming signal, while power is supplied separately to ensure proper operation of the driver.  It is emerging as the default dimming option with commercial LED fixtures. One reason for its rise to popularity was its documented open standards and consistent performance.  Requires interface device to ballast/driver for addressability  Networked via low voltage field bus DALI  Open protocol or systems with proprietary extensions to DALI  Addressability built in ballasts/drivers  Communication & power in one cable 15
  15. 15. Wired System Architecture In a typical hardwired lighting control system, control signals are sent using communication wires.
  16. 16. Low voltage digital  Open protocol (ZigBee®), Wi-Fi® or proprietary  ZigBee features low power consumption (& extended battery life), mesh topology, self-configuring (discovery), self-healing (automatic redirection of communication in the event of unexpected interruptions in the network) and high level security (128-bit encryption)  An interface device to ballast/driver is used for enabling wireless communication 17
  17. 17. Wireless Addressable Systems ZigBee®  ZigBee features low power consumption (extended battery life), mesh topology, self-configuring (discovery), self-healing (automatic redirection of communication in the event of unexpected interruptions in the network) and high level security (128-bit encryption)  Requires interface device to ballast/driver for wireless communication WRM C WRM S/WS WRM WRM S/WS S/WS WRM S/WS S/WS C – Controller WRM – Wireless Routing Module (attached to Luminaires) S/WS – Sensor or Wall Station (no signal routing/regeneration)
  18. 18. Wireless Addressable Systems Wi-Fi®  Requires interface device to ballast/driver for wireless communication  Basically replaces a cabled Ethernet connection with a wireless device.
  19. 19. Wireless Addressable Systems EnOcean®  Essentially a proprietary protocol  Based on point to point network topology  The main objective of this technology is to allow sensors and switches to operate without batteries
  20. 20. Wireless System Architecture In a wireless system, control devices communicate through the air using radio-frequency RF waves without the need for control wiring.
  21. 21. Combination of Wired/Wireless Addressable Systems  Single server connects to both wired & wireless controllers  Wireless lighting control is used as an extension of wired lighting control network  One side of the building is wired while the other side of the building is wireless 22
  22. 22. Hybrid System Architecture - 1 Hybrid system is bets of both worlds – Combination of wired & wireless architectures
  23. 23. Combination of Wired/Wireless Addressable Systems  Enabling wired devices such as wallstations & sensors via wireless modules – in this scenario, low- voltage wired devices are connected to line voltage powered wireless modules.  Best of both worlds – no need to go back to ceiling.  No need to worry about battery replacement  Wireless modules and connected wired devices (sensors & wallstations) are all still individually addressable 24
  24. 24. Hybrid System Architecture - 2 Hybrid system is bets of both worlds – Combination of wired & wireless architectures
  25. 25. Comparison of both systems
  26. 26. Pros  Control  Security  Reliability  Speed Cons  Convenience  Cost  Interruption of building operation for additions
  27. 27. Pros  Convenience – significant reduction installation complexity  Cost  Reduced space, weight & power requirements  Easy to expand to accommodate changes and additions  Ideal for hard to reach places  Less or no interruption of building operation for additions Cons  Control: Software based system with features like web access, GUI based control & 3D display can overcome this issue  Security: Wireless systems that employ 128-bit encryption can overcome this issue  Reliability: Wireless systems that employ mesh topology, self-configuring & self-healing features can overcome this issue  Speed: Supports up to 250 kb/s (suffice for control applications)
  28. 28. Winner?
  29. 29.  Is your building already built or in the process of being built?  If the building is currently in the construction phase or under development, it is the most opportune time to integrate a wired lighting control system.  For a pre-existing building, a wireless lighting control solution will be your best option.
  30. 30.  Although wireless technology has come a long way, a wired solution is still the most reliable.  System can be configured to turn the lights to full brightness when loss of network/control connection is detected. This ensures building occupant safety is not compromised.
  31. 31.  A Wireless system creates a mesh network: that is, more nodes/repeaters you have in a given radius the stronger the signal will be.  Wired systems support long cable runs (for example, 2500 ft.)
  32. 32.  Expanding on a wired centralized lighting system can be very difficult and costly
  33. 33.  Labor costs are generally higher for wired systems.
  34. 34. Wired lighting system  During construction, cost effective, and more secure. Wireless lighting system  After construction, cost effective and easy expandability. Pick a system that utilizes “open/industry standard” protocol and at the same time offer wired, wireless & hybrid solutions/architectures
  35. 35. This concludes The American Institute of Architects Continuing Education Systems Course

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