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Harnessing cpd a road map for the future by Luke Stevens

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Harnessing cpd a road map for the future by Luke Stevens

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Luke Stevens from CILIP takes us through the concept of Continuous Professional Development (CPD) and why it is so vital for for Librarians now and in preparation for the future and how CILIP can aid in this.

Luke Stevens from CILIP takes us through the concept of Continuous Professional Development (CPD) and why it is so vital for for Librarians now and in preparation for the future and how CILIP can aid in this.

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Harnessing cpd a road map for the future by Luke Stevens

  1. 1. Harnessing CPD: a roadmap for the future Luke Stevens-Burt Assistant Director (Member Services)
  2. 2. What is CPD? “Intentionally developing the knowledge, skills and personal knowledge needed to perform professional responsibilities” - CPD Standards Office
  3. 3. What does CPD mean to you? Image credited by CC: GotCredit (www.gotcredit.com)
  4. 4. What do other professionals say about CPD? Rank Avg Score Activity Acq’n / Part’n 1 2.56 Attending course etc A 2 2.18 Reading tech material A 3 2.88 Reading mags, journals etc A 4 1.53 Online learning modules A 5= 1.45 Accessing the internet A 5= 1.45 Participating in workshops A/P 7 1.29 Interacting with experts A/P 8 0.97 Doing your job regularly P 9 0.95 Reflecting on performance P 10 0.88 Being shown by others P 11 0.62 Observing others work P
  5. 5. Relevance of CPD Activities Rank Avg Score Activity Acq’n / Part’n 1 2.65 Accessing the internet A 2 2.44 Doing your job regularly P 3 2.00 Reading tech material A 4 1.96 Reading mags, journals etc A 5 1.90 Attending courses etc A 6 1.88 Reflecting on performance P 7 1.87 Interacting with experts A/P 8 1.45 Being shown by others P 9 1.25 Participating in workshops A/P 10 1.23 Observing others work P
  6. 6. The Changing Professional Landscape Image credits by CC: Professional Association Research Network, Hartwig HKD
  7. 7. CPD = Spice of Professional Life Knowledge synthesis Information retrieval Copyright & intellectual property Digitisation Information literacy Leadership skills People management Customer service skills Media and PR skills Partnership development
  8. 8. Moving to deeper engagement with learning ...and on the topic of being back at work... Image credits: Will Evans, Janet Lindenmuth, Sandra Schon, Visilis Galapoulos, Aminorjourney, Oblas Steinhoff, Jason Parks ENGAGED WORKER!!!
  9. 9. Becoming a Complete Professional intrapersonal interpersonal cognitive CPD and other learning
  10. 10. Title of slide
  11. 11. Other resources for CPD
  12. 12. Member Networks Perfect for: • Developing your skills and knowledge • Finding out about opportunities • A critical friend • Getting experience through committee work
  13. 13. The CILIP Virtual Learning Environment CILIP VLE CILIP Portfolio
  14. 14. Publications and Ebulletins • CILIP Update magazine • Online Journals (including LISA and SAGE) • Ebulletins (including weekly update and Lisjobnet) • Social Media
  15. 15. Professional Registration • The perfect way to demonstrate your commitment to your personal development and the profession • Provides you with further skills, knowledge and experience to take your career forward • Professional Registration is internationally recognised ACLIP MCLIP FCLIP Revalidation
  16. 16. Revalidation What it means for you and how it works
  17. 17. Revalidation In order to revalidate, members need to: • Log 20 hours of CPD activities • Submit a 250 word reflective statement • No evidence required • All submitted and assessed on CILIP VLE • No additional charge
  18. 18. What are the benefits to members? • Self satisfaction • Demonstrates commitment • Professional recognition • Deeper engagement • Raises the professional bar
  19. 19. Common Barriers to CPD Image credits by CC: Sean MacEntee, Lawrence OP, Sima Dimitric, Hobvias Sudoneighm, Noe Alfaro , Sam Davis
  20. 20. Conclusion – harnessing your CPD opportunities • Make the most of all CPD opportunities that you get • Take time to reflect on your learning • Broaden your horizons as much as you can in terms of CPD activities • Have a plan • Engage with your CPD, job and professional network • Aim for an holistic approach to learning opportunities
  21. 21. So what does the future look like???
  22. 22. A disclaimer... “Not possible to predict the future, but we can make sense of the direction of travel and identify uncertainties” - UK Commission for Employment and Skills (2014)
  23. 23. But first...some sage advice about career choices...
  24. 24. We’re living in the early days of a revolution in the ways in which people use information and technology in their daily lives. In the next 20-30 years, every person, every organisation and business will need access to library & information skills and professional values to succeed.
  25. 25. A sector in transition...
  26. 26. Evolution of Information Image: antbear.de Image: wordpress.com Image: looklex.com By Glosser.ca (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons Image: betabeat.com Image: harleymaples.blogspot.uk
  27. 27. We’re living through an era of great change. As a society, many of our political and economic certainties have been disrupted. This disruption is ongoing. The reason why it feels like we’re not on solid ground is because the change is still underway. What worked 10 years ago isn’t going to work today. Use Time Formats, contexts and behaviours change, professional ethics, values, core purpose & mission don’t “...we are still in a long transitional phase between these two eras [‘print-based industrial society’ to ‘ technology-based internet society’], and that so- called ‘information overload’ is one of the many unfortunate but temporary consequences of being in this interim state of flux.” - Susskind and Susskind (2016)
  28. 28. Information Professionals Librarians Public Librarians School Librarians Library Managers & Assistants Health Librarians Govt Librarians Data Librarians Academic & Research Librarians Subject Librarians Other Librarians Information Managers Information Architects Information Governance Managers Information Scientists Information Rights Managers Data Protection Officers Taxonomy Specialists Analysts Cyber- security Managers Web Managers Knowledge Managers Change Managers Knowledge Architects Knowledge Advisers Chief Knowledge Officers KM Facilitators Data Professionals Data Scientists Machine Learning Specialists Data Analytics Managers Artificial Intelligence Specialists
  29. 29. No longer defined by a single title Information Professionals Additional roles Allied professions Information Managers Records Managers Information Rights Knowledge Managers Librarians Information Architects Archivists Data Managers Transparency Information Assurance Information Designers Copyright Specialists Researchers Analysts Web Managers Information Risk Information Technology Project Managers Statisticians Communications Economists Historians
  30. 30. 12,000 members, UK-wide... Consulting/independent information professionals Prison Further Education/Colleges Public Government and Armed Forces Research Health Care School Social Care Special Collections Higher Education (including LIS teaching staff) Industry (Extraction)* Law Industry (Manufacturing)** Museums, Archives, Galleries and Heritage Industry (Commercial Services)*** National Libraries Not working**** Not for profit/3rd sector/Charity Other * Any extraction industries, for example: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing, Mining, Quarrying ** Any Manufacturing industries, for example: Pharmaceutical, Aerospace, Automotive *** Any commercial service industries: Business, Finance, Communications, Hospitality, Retail **** Unemployed/Retired/Full-time Student/Career Break
  31. 31. Approximately 45% of CILIP’s current membership will reach retirement age in the next 10 years Source: 2014 CILIP Membership Survey
  32. 32. So what does all this mean for the future...? And what is the role of the information professional?
  33. 33. UKCES (2014)
  34. 34. What skills and attributes should we cultivate?
  35. 35. Towards a Skills Framework Leaders ManagersSpecialists Local Staff Skills include: Visible, negotiator, compelling communicator, persuasive, creative, adaptable, commercial, advocate and strategist. Understand legal context and framework Activities include: Set direction, set values and ethical principles, work with stakeholders and policymakers, inspire and motivate the workforce, lead change and secure funding, build the business Skills include: Problem-solving, project management, commercial contractors, change managers, resourceful, people managers, credible and resilient leaders, communicators Activities include: Expertly manage the resources to support and enable local staff to do their work, manage and encourage risk, problem-solve, develop partnerships and performance. Skills include: Current knowledge, knowledge management, communication, creativity, credible commercial, project managers. Transferrable skills in information, records and knowledge management Activities include: Developed and accredited (qualified) expertise to solve complex problems, provides skilled advice, competence or services enable local and countrywide services Skills include: Welcoming, proactive, literate, creative, resilient and adaptable team players. Local leaders. Advocacy, upskilling, IT and digital literacy, facilitation, communication and writing. Activities include: Providing an inclusive and expert service to local library users. Public Library Skills Strategy (2017)
  36. 36. Towards a Skills Framework Leaders ManagersSpecialists Local Staff Skills include: Visible, negotiator, compelling communicator, persuasive, creative, adaptable, commercial, advocate and strategist. Understand legal context and framework Activities include: Set direction, set values and ethical principles, work with stakeholders and policymakers, inspire and motivate the workforce, lead change and secure funding, build the business Skills include: Problem-solving, project management, commercial contractors, change managers, resourceful, people managers, credible and resilient leaders, communicators Activities include: Expertly manage the resources to support and enable local staff to do their work, manage and encourage risk, problem-solve, develop partnerships and performance. Skills include: Current knowledge, knowledge management, communication, creativity, credible commercial, project managers. Transferrable skills in information, records and knowledge management Activities include: Developed and accredited (qualified) expertise to solve complex problems, provides skilled advice, competence or services enable local and countrywide services Skills include: Welcoming, proactive, literate, creative, resilient and adaptable team players. Local leaders. Advocacy, upskilling, IT and digital literacy, facilitation, communication and writing. Activities include: Providing an inclusive and expert service to local library users. Public Library Skills Strategy (2017) Literacy Creativity Resilience Adaptability Visibility Persuasiveness Strategist Problem solving Change management Resourcefulness
  37. 37. Increase in influencing... ...and save us from yet another economic downturn
  38. 38. Economic influence “...the lesson of history is that at precisely the moment when we believe we’ve solved the mystery of how to manage our economies safely, the next financial crisis will rise up in front of us and biff us on the noggin...” - Peston (2012)
  39. 39. Future Workforce Roles • Craftspeople • Assistants • Paraprofessionals • Empathizers • R&D workers • Knowledge engineers • Process analysts • Moderators • Designers • Systems providers • Data scientists • Systems engineers • Craftspeople • Assistants • Paraprofessionals • Empathizers • R&D workers • Knowledge engineers • Process analysts • Moderators • Designers • Systems providers • Data scientists • Systems engineers - Susskind and Susskind (2014)
  40. 40. In the future employers will increasingly need to: • Attract resilient employees with the capacity to innovate, to collaborate and proactively support and promote change • Manage skills and talent across networks and portfolios • Have staff who can adapt to open business models and more fluid employment arrangements • Develop sustainable workforce opportunities and learning pathways for young people • Develop increasing diversity in the workforce • Support a greater range of flexible working arrangements • Intensify collaboration with the education and training sector to access critical skills Public Library Skills Strategy (2017)
  41. 41. And the role of professional bodies?
  42. 42. We will build a thriving workforce for the future, attracting talent, and encouraging the creation of high-quality jobs
  43. 43. CILIP’s goal for 2020 is to put library and information skills at the heart of a democratic, equal and prosperous society
  44. 44. Developing your career as a librarian and information professional...
  45. 45. Key characteristics... ‘Hire for attitude...’ Transferrable skills Leadership Agent of change Educator Ethical
  46. 46. Interactive PKSB
  47. 47. CILIP Sectors SIG - Sector SIG – Cross cutting themes/specialisms Other (Career stage) Armed forces Government Information Group CataloguingandIndexingGroup Community,DiversityandEqualityGroup InformationLiteracyGroup InformationServicesGroup InternationalLibraryandInformationGroup LibraryandInformationHistoryGroup LibraryandInformationResearchGroup MultimediaInformationandTechnologyGroup PublicityandPublicRelationsGroup RareBooksandSpecialCollectionsGroup UKeInformationGroup RetiredMembersGuild StudentCommittee Government Health Care Health Libraries Group Social Care Commerce/Business Commercial, Legal and Scientific Information Group Consulting/Independent Information Professional Industry/Science Law Not for Profit/Third Sector Prison Prison Libraries Group Museums, Archives and Galleries Local Studies Group Public Library Public and Mobile Libraries Group Youth Libraries Group School (Primary) School Libraries GroupSchool (Secondary) Further Education Academic and Research Libraries Group Higher Education National Library Research and LIS Professional networking...
  48. 48. Professional networking
  49. 49. Professional Registration An internationally-recognised demonstration of your commitment to personal development and the profession • ACLIP • MCLIP • FCLIP
  50. 50. References • Hilary, L. Adaptability, (2014), PARN • Peston, R. How do we fix this mess?, (2012) Hodder • Susskind R. and Susskind D., The Future of the Professions, (2015) Oxford University Press • A Study of the UK Information Workforce, (2015), CILIP [https://www.cilip.org.uk/about/projects-reviews/workforce- mapping] • Public Library Skills Strategy, (2017), CILIP and SCL [https://www.cilip.org.uk/news/scl-cilip-set-out-joint-public- library-skills-strategy] • The Future of Work: jobs and skills in 2030, (2014) UKCES [https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/jobs-and- skills-in-2030]
  51. 51. Thank you! luke.stevens-burt@cilip.org.uk

Editor's Notes

  • I think it would be useful to start off with a brief introduction to CPD and what it means, but more importantly how broad it really is and it’s place in the modern work force. You can see how the CPD Standards Office defines CPD (“Intentionally developing the knowledge, skills and personal knowledge needed to perform professional responsibilities”). Does this make sense to everyone?
  • Before we go any further I would like to take a quick poll as to what you see as CPD activities. I have provided you with a table with responses to fill out. All you have to do is indicate with a cross or a tick how regularly you view each of the activities as CPD. This is not a test; all responses are anonymous. What I would like to do is produce your results before the end of the presentation and compare them with similar research conducted several years ago. We’re only doing this over the next couple of minutes, so just give each activity brief thought and go with your initial instinct. Any questions?
    [upon completion – Please collect your responses together and pass them to me so that my assistant can do some tabulation of the results]
  • Similar research was conducted in 2011 with accountants from the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales. These are their responses. You could argue that the research is a little old and attitudes have changed, but that is not to say that these views do not exist in 2015. You could also argue that this is specific to accountants. Well – we’ll see shortly, but a similar research project was undertaken of PA’s and other professions and the results reflected a similar mindset.
    I would like to explain the A’s and the P’s in this slide too. What these refer to are learning as acquisition and learning as participation. What this means, in essence, is that there are two main method we undertake learning, one is gaining knowledge and skills from a source whether it be text or verbally from once place – there is little engagement with the learning other than that it is transferred from one place to the learner. The other main method is when we see development of knowledge and skills through a dynamic interaction with a variety of sources and/or learning shifting through multiple phases, i.e. we engage more actively with it. What we can see from these results is that CPD is predominantly recognised as learning as acquisition activities. But as we will see as we move on in this session is that the modern approach to learning is more dynamic than this. However, subconsciously we might recognise this already.
  • This is another set of results from the same research. This time the question is: What learning activities do you feel are most relevant? Now the responses have changed somewhat when we look at the arrangement of A’s/P’s. It shows that professionals think differently about what a CPD activity is and the relevance of learning activities. Subconsciously it appears that we are more likely to recognise that learning has taken place in a wider variety of activities than we actually see them as learning activities. This is an important aspect to highlight, i.e. that there is a deeper sense of learning than we sometimes acknowledge. Our engagement with learning activities is a lot wider than most professionals would give credit for, but I do believe this is changing. I do think that as more research like this is undertaken, that the subconscious and conscious will intermingle a bit more. And this is where the new model of learning that I am introducing is heading.
  • Now that we have done some “warm up” thinking around CPD and CPD activities, I want to explore the topic a bit further. From here on I will be introducing further thinking based on research undertaken by Professor Lindsay Hilary, who has proposed the model I’ll be discussing. Her research over a number of years from 2011-2014 became the basis for her book, Adaptability. It explored many different texts about CPD and also included the research highlighted in the previous slides.
    So, thinking about our approach to CPD activities and how we learn, some might ask why this is so important and that it is an organic process, something that we pick up (quite often subconsciously) as we do our jobs. Well, that is correct, in part, but the professional landscape has changed over the last 2 decades. Traditional career pathways are no longer followed as often and people’s pursuits of healthier work-life balances have meant the way we approach our jobs, and how we train for those jobs, has changed. What this means is that, as professionals, we are required to be highly adaptable. It also means that how we prepare ourselves for different stages of our careers means that we need to take a dynamic approach to learning. Methods need to meet these needs, but fortunately we are no longer constrained solely by classroom-based training, but rather have access to a range of opportunities that meet our diverse needs, both in practical purposes (i.e. fitting in with your resources), and pedagogical (i.e. different learning styles).
  • There is a saying that variety is the spice of life. If that is true, then I would liken CPD to our professional lives. Let’s think back to the research results I chatted through earlier on and how wide engagement with CPD actually is. If you think CPD is attending a training course or conference, you’d be right: it is. But it is only one example. Now this is where it can become slightly less tangible because, in effect, CPD takes place when an individual has improved or increased their knowledge through an experience, i.e. development. Think back to the definition I started with. The concept that CPD is attending a course is popular. Research – such as I have shown earlier – has shown that professionals (samples featured accountants and personal assistants) see courses etc as the most recognisable form of learning activity. So what about when you observe a colleague working and learn about something new? Is this less relevant than attending a course? Of course not.
    That said, research undertaken by CILIP in recent years (2013) shows that, as a membership, we still prefer face-to-face learning. It all counts as CPD, so make the best of Member Network events (both regional and special interests).
  • Let’s consider the some finer aspects of learning. Lindsay cites Felstead et al (2005), who came up with the concepts of “learning as acquisition” (i.e. obtaining information from singular sources in a one-directional manner, e.g. a course) and “learning as participation” (i.e. obtaining information through interactions with the environment and/or stakeholders, e.g. doing your job). Whilst we are more likely to recognise learning as acquisition activities as CPD, sometimes the learning as participation activities encourage deeper learning. Let’s consider attendance at a conference for example (acquisition). You listen to speakers who impart knowledge to you, but what about the conversations that you might have afterward (participation), or when you implement your learning at work (participation), or when you teach others these new skills/knowledge (participation)? These are valuable CPD activities that take learning to the next level.
    [Click through: And back at the workplace]
    And while we are talking about learning at the workplace, there is a further benefit of CPD that is worth mentioning. There is an ongoing piece of research called the CPD Research Project, which engages with a multitude of professions, monitoring perceptions of and engagement with CPD. The Project (which was undertaken by the Professional Development Consortium) also found that a deeper engagement with CPD activities has a correlation with a deeper engagement at work, i.e. those who regularly engage with CPD see positive engagement with their work. Of course, the same could be said the other way round, i.e. deeper engagement with work results in deeper engagement with CPD (to improve skills), but ultimately what can be seen is the positive influence of a bi-directional relationship between the two. Clearly this has benefits for the employer (as well as employee), so if your employer needs some convincing how CPD benefits the organisation, be sure to quote this to them.
  • According to Illeris (2002) there are three dimensions of learning: cognitive (this is where we develop our knowledge and understanding, i.e. where we are consciously learning), intrapersonal (this is how, as an individual, we assimilate this knowledge relating it our own development – it is reflective and can happen subconsciously), and interpersonal (this element encompasses how we pass on and develop our knowledge by sharing it with others and getting their insights/perspective on it). I touched on this before in my example of attending a conference and how wide the learning opportunity extends to. If we can get this balance between all three right, it is a good step towards getting the most from learning. This forms the foundations for a new, modern and holistic model for learning. [insert figure 1]
    Revalidation contributes to this model by encouraging continual engagement with CPD. The CILIP scheme employs an input (hours logged) and output-based (reflective practice). The latter has advantages such as: participation in a wide and evolving range of learning activities; individual influence (i.e. being able to choose what suits you best); focus on developing and maintaining competence (i.e. keeping up-to-date). This is underpinned by the requirement to write a reflective statement, an important part of the learning process.
    The diagram shows the cognitive aspect placed at the top, but this does not mean that formalised learning is most important. Consider it as the starting point for knowledge both intra- and interpersonally. This is where the important bit comes in, which Livingstone (2002) (cited in Lindsay’s research) defined as the ‘informal learning iceberg’: that deeper, fuller learning happens below the surface. It is here where we develop our overall professional competence, but further than that is developing the full suite of competencies that makes us complete, adaptable professionals, able to cope with the ever-evolving work environment that we have become accustomed to. Failure to do this can create some difficulty, particularly in the modern work environment.
    The finer aspects of what make up the potential for career adaptability are defined by: self-belief (confidence in yourself), positive attitude (being optimistic), experimenting (trying out new ideas), exploring (researching what else is out there), engaging (interacting with others and the environment). Taking all these elements that have been described thus far and putting them into a model produces this:
  • Lindsay’s research shows that “individuals whose learning takes into account all nine elements are described as ‘complete’ professionals”. The model can apply to one’s overall approach to life-long learning, or singular learning activities. Whilst isolated activities will rarely cover all of these elements, it is important to understand how a number of activities will contribute to this complete picture over time. I should clarify that I’m not suggesting that you have to consciously consider all these elements every time you choose an activity. Most of the time this will happen in an organic, subconscious way, but being aware of what makes up the complete picture will ensure that you benefit more from your CPD engagement.
    Lindsay’s research shows these deeper aspects of learning are echoed in the UKCES report into career adaptability (Bimrose et al, 2011). The report states that developing adaptability at work can be achieved by learning adaptability through: challenging work; updating a substantive knowledge base; interactions at work; self-directed learning and self-reflectiveness. All four of these relate specifically to the top four triangles in the model, but that does not discount the five adaptability elements. These are affected too, but in a more organic and subconscious manner.
  • Whilst the PKSB is an invaluable tool for working through your development areas, I would like to spend a little time talking through some other resources that you can use for career planning. The idea is that you should be looking to build up a full range of resources that you use in conjunction with the PKSB in order to ensure you get the best approach.
  • You might have an existing professional network through work, LinkedIn etc, but CILIP offers ready made networks throughout the UK via regional networks and special interests. Our MNs run a host of activities and there are lots of opportunities to develop yourself professionally and personally through training, and engage with other, like-minded professionals. In short, it is an excellent source of CPD, but in addition you can build up your career resources by:
    Broadening your skills and knowledge through the various activities and events that are run by the member networks
    Finding out about possible job opportunities
    Using your colleagues as a “critical friend”, i.e. Using their sector expertise to helping out with applications, giving realistic feedback on your development areas
    Experience is quite often one of the most challenging aspects to develop, particularly where opportunities are not afforded to you in your current employment situation. There are many different ways you can get involved in voluntary roles within the wider CILIP community and by getting involved in these will give you a chance to develop other skills and knowledge, e.g. Finance, leadership, event planning etc; vital experience that will set you apart from others when applying for new roles
  • The CILIP Virtual Learning Environment consists of two parts:
    The CILIP VLE – this is the courses area, where we have created online learning resources to support your professional development. There is a special area for professional registration with courses to support each of the levels, and revalidation. This is where candidates submit their Portfolios

    CILIP Portfolio – this is the user generated content area, where CILIP members can create their own content and collaborate. This is where candidates will upload their content, put it into a Portfolio page that can be shared, and then share it with you their mentor and the Professional registration Assessors. Members can collaborate through the Groups on the CILIP Portfolio – there are ones for Chartership, Certification and Fellowship that are well used by members to offer mutual support and advice.

    One of the things that causes candidates confusion is the fact they have to switch between these two systems
    They go into the VLE for help and support and learning opportunities, then into the CILIP Portfolio to create their content e.g. CPD log, reflections, upload evidence. Create a portfolio page and then have to come back into the CILIP VLE to pay and submit.

    So if any of you are mentors please can you help them remember this.
  • Stay up-to-date with the latest news, views and developments from the sector. CILIP membership gives you access to news, in-depth features, interviews with thought-leaders, and articles from across the information profession. You will receive our monthly CILIP Update magazine, our weekly latest news bulletin and access to a wide range of professional journals.
    CILIP Update magazine
    Update is the leading publication for the library, information and knowledge management community. An essential read for all information professionals, it contains news, interviews with key figures in the information world and in-depth features on topics across the sectors.
    Online journals
    Members have access to abstracts and full text journal articles covering a broad range of library and information topics. Journals are provided by a number of leading publishers including Proquest and SAGE. 
    Ebulletins
    Keep up to date with the stories that matter most by subscribing to our member-only weekly news ebulletin. Each edition contains the previous week's relevant stories and news as well as updates on what's happening here at CILIP. Other ebulletins include those by Facet Publishing, Lisjobnet and CILIP events.
  • I would also like to take a moment to mention PR as part of the tools that you can use in developing your career plan. As a confidence booster PR works really well in gaining a better understanding of the role you play and the changes that you help bring about.
    It is also a way of demonstrating your commitment to yourself and the profession, because of the way PR works, it is not a case of doing course work, but rather thinking about your personal contributions and development on a regular basis, i.e. Through revalidation
    The PR process will also take you on a journey that you can develop your skills further in order to make yourself a better prospect as a candidate
    As a registered professional information/library worker, your skills and knowledge will be internationally recognised through PR
  • Part of this presentation was to talk about revalidation and why CILIP is proposing to adopt an obligatory scheme in 2016. Revalidation is a professional’s opportunity to showcase the level of engagement that they have undertaken over the previous year. It is a chance for them to reflect on what learning has taken place and what it has meant to them individually. CILIP strongly believe in this concept and also know that our members are good at this, but do not necessarily actively acknowledge it. Maintaining an e-portfolio provides the opportunity to do this, to think deeply about the learning that has taken place, and to be recognised for it.
    We’re always doing CPD, so all it is, is a case of recording it. The CPD Research Project (2012) did a case study of personal assistants and found that every single respondent undertook a form of CPD very frequently, yet many seemed to think (initially) that they did not engage with CPD at all. Only 8% engaged in formal CPD schemes, it was the informal activities that most respondents made most use of. This demonstrates the 'secret presence' of CPD within any profession and the need to highlight its profile and role.
  • One of the objectives of CILIP’s Future Skills Project, the report that introduced the significant changes to all levels of Professional Registration, was to introduce Obligatory Revalidation – CILIP Council agreed to work towards this introduction for January 2015.

    In early 2014, the decision was taken to postpone obligatory revalidation at allow the new system time to get established and to give us extra time to communicate these changes to the membership and address any questions that members may have.

    It is now anticipated that obligatory revalidation will be implemented in January 2016 following a significant publicity and stakeholder engagement campaign. During 2015 members will be communicated with extensively and a ballot will be held in the last quarter of 2015.
  • Adds value to your ACLIP, MCLIP, FCLIP qualification through:

    Self satisfaction of completing the process and reflecting on the work you have done during the year

    Helps you demonstrate to employers your commitment to your career

    Professional recognition that you are keeping your skills and knowledge up-to-date

    Encourages deeper engagement with the profession

    Raises the professional bar equal to that of other professions (e.g. medical, law, construction etc), we believe that this will add significant value to members qualifications and will overtime increase the standing of the profession.
  • Finding the time – the delicate art of the work-life balance creates time pressures, but there is always time CPD; this may mean doing activities during free time, but benefits outweigh the “cost”; if you can only do short amounts of CPD, then opt for activities that fit within that time frame – Twitter, blogs and other forms of social media can be engaged with in bite-sized chunks if need be
    Financing activities – this can be tough, but there are a lot of cheap/free activities that can be taken advantage of especially on the world wide web; CILIP membership grants you access to a wide range of resources to boost your CPD each year: Update Magazine, Weekly eUpdate, Member Network events, Volunteering opportunities, Journal access, And more...
    CPD activities are boring – find some activities that you enjoy, there are a wide variety to choose from; provide you are learning something and developing yourself, that is what is the most important
    Unsupportive employer – this can be a tough obstacle to overcome, but research shows that employees who engage with their work better and increase productivity (in a national survey 88% of respondents – project managers – agreed with this), explain to our employer that they will be benefitting from this, perhaps even more than you are
    Location of learning activities – quite often accessibility it cited as an issue, the CILIP membership survey at the end of 2014 highlighted this issue, but as pointed out above, remote CPD opportunities are available. CILIP is constantly developing content on the VLE, all of which can be accessed online. On-the-job learning is highly valuable too; if a colleague has attended a course lately or developed a new skill, why not take the time to learn from them while you are working?
    Identifying skills gaps – you may not always be certain what skills you need to develop, but using your PKSB will help with this. You could discuss this with your line manager, or a senior colleague too.
  • As mentioned, these are (for me) some of the highlights of an adaptable model that we, as modern day professionals, can adopt so that we can become more complete, confident, adaptable individuals. There are just a few concluding points I would like to make:
    Make the most of all CPD opportunities that you get
    Take time to reflect on your learning
    Broaden your horizons as much as you can in terms of CPD activities
    Have a plan
    Engage with your CPD, job and professional network
    As I mentioned earlier there is a 2-part article in the next 2 issues of CILIP Update that describes CPD in some more detail, although by attending this session you have benefitted from being given a little more information about Hilary’s model. I hope that you enjoyed this session and will be thinking about this model as you attend the rest of the conference, and of course when you engage with colleagues at some point after it, truly harnessing the learning opportunities that you encounter. There is now time to take questions, but if you don’t get a chance to ask, then please feel free to find me at the CILIP stand or between sessions during the rest of the conference and have a chat.
  • Before I start I would like to add a disclaimer. This presentation suggests at some predictions based on a variety of pieces of research. It should not be treated as a 100% accurate forecast of the future, but attempts to illuminate the current trajectory of both society and the information workforce as a whole.

    This is also a very large subject and we could spend the better part of the day exploring a variety of scenarios and what the effects and impacts on the profession might be. What I will be doing is focussing on a select number of specific areas that have the greatest level of relevance and likelihood at this point in time.

    If you take anything away from the presentation today it is this: change is here...it always has been...and no matter what path we ultimately tread, information professionals need to be adaptable.
  • Although the digital revolution is not brand new, we are still living in early days...etc

    The image on this slide is CILIP’s Professional Knowledge and Skills Base, a framework that outlines and describes the different skills and knowledge that our profession use to carry our their duties. And it is these that society is (and will be) in crucial need of over the coming years.
  • Before getting to the more pertinent topics, it is useful to touch on some history. The way we store and access information has changed considerably since humans found ways to record it [information]. This is not an evolutionary piece of information in itself, it is something that each of us is fully aware of...but what are the implications of this? Clearly the formats in which we have recorded information in the past, has always been shaped by the equipment and technology of the time. The accessibility of information has also changed with the latter and former, as well as being further governed by policies and regulations.
  • Meeting these challenges means building a thriving workforce for the future, attracting, retaining and developing talent and sustaining the creation of high-quality jobs which make use of our broad range of skills.
  • So what additional personas might you have to adopt during your day job?
    You might have to teach; and I am not just talking about those who are in school libraries; armed with vital information about the organisations you support, your role is vital in decision making processes
    You need to be a digital guru, knowing how to harness available technologies to store, search and access information, not only correctly, but also being able to provide a certain amount of advice and support in order to better understand the results returned, or indeed the greater context in which those results are produced.
    ...and these are just a few...so where does that leave us?
  • There are a number of skills listed in this figure and whilst it is presented in the public library context, I would suggest that many of these are applicable in all sectors within this profession. I appreciate that there are a lot to read there, so to pick out a few specifics: literate, creative, resilient, adaptable, visible, persuasive, strategist, problem solving, change managers, resourceful
  • There are a number of skills listed in this figure and whilst it is presented in the public library context, I would suggest that many of these are applicable in all sectors within this profession. I appreciate that there are a lot to read there, so to pick out a few specifics: literacy, creativity, resilience, adaptability, visibility, persuasiveness, strategist, problem solving, change management, resourcefulness
  • The profession does a lot of good, but we need to get better at influencing others, particularly those in positions of power.

    An excellent example of where this will be valuable is the avoidance of another “credit crunch”.
  • As Robert Peston states in one of his books, it is only a matter of time until we will be threatened with another financial crisis. Yes, so called “experts” will have a variety of models and computer algorithms to help predict – and therefore warn us – that one is coming, but the likelihood is that they won’t. As information professionals, it will be imperative to work with one another and other professionals to help steer decision-makers away from disaster.

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