GOOD AND BAD DESIGN

Old Design

2 L.F.M.I. 2014
WHAT TO DESIGN?
• Need to take into account:

• Who the users are
• What activities are being carried out
• Where the inte...
WHAT IS INTERACTION DESIGN?
• Designing interactive products to support the way people communicate and interact in their
e...
GOALS OF INTERACTION DESIGN
• Develop usable products
• Increase user experience
• Design practices contributing to id:
G...
RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ID, HCI & OTHER
FIELD
• Interdisciplinary fields in interaction design:
• HCI
• Ubiquitous computing
...
WHAT DO PROFESSIONAL DO IN THE ID
BUSINESS?
• Interaction designers - people involved in the design of all the interactive...
WHAT IS COGNITION?
• It involves cognitive processes, like thinking, remembering, learning, daydreaming, decision
making, ...
USER MODELS
• Interaction
• Important to study the cognitive activity
• What users can or cannot do!
• Helps identify and ...
COGNITIVE MODEL : GOMS
• Goals
What a user wants to achieve
• Operations
Basic actions which user has to perform to use ...
EXERCISE

•How would you go about closing a
window? In that case that you’re playing a
game in a full screen window is it ...
ANSWER
Element

Description

Goal

Closing a window when game exit is not working

Operation

Use MENU method
Use CTRL+W m...
MENTAL MODELS
• Users develop an understanding of a system through learning and using it.

CONCEPTUAL MODELS
• Need to fir...
Keys and
button

INPUT DEVICE
• PURPOSE :
ENTERING DATA INTO A COMPUTER SYSTEM
ISSUING INSTRUCTIONS (COMMAND) TO A

Visu...
TEXT ENTRY DEVICES

Keyboard : QWERTY

17 L.F.M.I. 2014

Keyboard : DVORAK

Ergonomic Keyboard
TEXT ENTRY DEVICES – ERGONOMIC
KEYBOARD

18 L.F.M.I. 2014
HANDWRITING RECOGNITION
• Text can be input into the computer, using a pen and a digesting tablet (eg: PDA & tablet with
s...
POINTING DEVICES
• Control the movement of the cursor on a display screen.
• Six interaction tasks can be performed by poi...
POINTING DEVICES
DIRECT

• Light pen
• Touch screen
• Stylus

21 L.F.M.I. 2014

INDIRECT

• Mouse
• Trackball
• Joystick
•...
A NEW IDEA

22 L.F.M.I. 2014
CHOOSING DEVICES
• Match physiological & psychological characteristics
• Appropriate for task
• Suitable for the work & en...
ALTERNATIVES

Gaze input - via reflections of laser
beam aimed at retina. Here with
pointing via data glove

24 L.F.M.I. 2...
DISPLAY TECHNOLOGY
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

Monochrome displays
RGB shadow-mask displays
Raster-scan cathode-ray tube (CRT)
Liquid...
GAME CONSOLE

26 L.F.M.I. 2014
Interaction design quick tour 1
Interaction design quick tour 1
Interaction design quick tour 1
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Interaction design quick tour 1

  1. 1. GOOD AND BAD DESIGN Old Design 2 L.F.M.I. 2014
  2. 2. WHAT TO DESIGN? • Need to take into account: • Who the users are • What activities are being carried out • Where the interaction is taking place • Need to optimize the interactions users have with a product • So that they match the users’ activities and needs 3 L.F.M.I. 2014
  3. 3. WHAT IS INTERACTION DESIGN? • Designing interactive products to support the way people communicate and interact in their everyday and working lives Sharp, rogers and preece (2011) WHAT IS HCI? • Human-computer interaction is a discipline concerned with the design, evaluation and implementation of interactive computing systems for human use and with the study of major phenomena surrounding them. (ACM SIGCHI, 1992, p.6) 4 L.F.M.I. 2014
  4. 4. GOALS OF INTERACTION DESIGN • Develop usable products • Increase user experience • Design practices contributing to id: Graphic design Product design Artist-design Industrial design Film industry 5 L.F.M.I. 2014
  5. 5. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ID, HCI & OTHER FIELD • Interdisciplinary fields in interaction design: • HCI • Ubiquitous computing • Human factors • Cognitive engineering • Cognitive ergonomics • Computer supported co-operative work • Information systems 6 L.F.M.I. 2014
  6. 6. WHAT DO PROFESSIONAL DO IN THE ID BUSINESS? • Interaction designers - people involved in the design of all the interactive aspects of a product • Usability engineers - people who focus on evaluating products, using usability methods and principles • Web designers - people who develop and create the visual design of websites, such as layouts • Information architects - people who come up with ideas of how to plan and structure interactive products • User experience designers (UX) - people who do all the above but who may also carry out field studies to inform the design of products 7 L.F.M.I. 2014
  7. 7. WHAT IS COGNITION? • It involves cognitive processes, like thinking, remembering, learning, daydreaming, decision making, seeing, reading, writing and talking. • Core cognitive aspects • Attention Most relevant to IDx • Perception and recognition • Memory • Learning • Reading, speaking and listening • Problem-solving, planning, reasoning and decision-making 9 L.F.M.I. 2014
  8. 8. USER MODELS • Interaction • Important to study the cognitive activity • What users can or cannot do! • Helps identify and explain problems • Cognitive user models explain • Observed human behaviour • Predict human performance 10 L.F.M.I. 2014
  9. 9. COGNITIVE MODEL : GOMS • Goals What a user wants to achieve • Operations Basic actions which user has to perform to use the system • Methods Methods available to perform task Consist of a series of steps of operations • Selection rules Used to decide upon which method to do specific task Attempts to predict which method will be used by a user 11 L.F.M.I. 2014
  10. 10. EXERCISE •How would you go about closing a window? In that case that you’re playing a game in a full screen window is it different (assuming the game exit is not working)? 12 L.F.M.I. 2014
  11. 11. ANSWER Element Description Goal Closing a window when game exit is not working Operation Use MENU method Use CTRL+W method USE-MENU-METHOD . MOVE-MOUSE-TO-FILE-MENU . PULL-DOWN-FILE-MENU . CLI CK – OVER- CLOSE-OPTION USE- C TRL-W- METHOD . PRESS – CONTROL – W- KEYS Rule 1: Select USE-MENU-METHOD unless another rule applies Rule 2: If the application is GAME, select C TRL-W- METHOD Method Rule 13 L.F.M.I. 2014
  12. 12. MENTAL MODELS • Users develop an understanding of a system through learning and using it. CONCEPTUAL MODELS • Need to first think about how the system will appear to users (i.e. how they will understand it) • Enables “designers to straighten out their thinking before they start laying out their widgets” (p. 28) • Provides a working strategy and a framework of general concepts and their interrelations 14 L.F.M.I. 2014
  13. 13. Keys and button INPUT DEVICE • PURPOSE : ENTERING DATA INTO A COMPUTER SYSTEM ISSUING INSTRUCTIONS (COMMAND) TO A Visual (camera & scanner) Input device categories COMPUTER TRANSFORMS DATA FROM THE USER INTO A FORM THAT A COMPUTER SYSTEM CAN PROCESS 16 L.F.M.I. 2014 Audio – voice/speech Pointing devices
  14. 14. TEXT ENTRY DEVICES Keyboard : QWERTY 17 L.F.M.I. 2014 Keyboard : DVORAK Ergonomic Keyboard
  15. 15. TEXT ENTRY DEVICES – ERGONOMIC KEYBOARD 18 L.F.M.I. 2014
  16. 16. HANDWRITING RECOGNITION • Text can be input into the computer, using a pen and a digesting tablet (eg: PDA & tablet with stylus) SPEECH RECOGNITION • Most successful when: • single user – initial training and learns peculiarities • limited vocabulary systems 19 L.F.M.I. 2014 • Problems with • external noise interfering • imprecision of pronunciation • large vocabularies • different speakers
  17. 17. POINTING DEVICES • Control the movement of the cursor on a display screen. • Six interaction tasks can be performed by pointing or manipulation devices:  Select (point and click)  Position (drag and click)  Orient (rotate)  Path (indicate path; position & orient combined)  Quantify (indicate exact spot)  Text (set insertion point for text) 20 L.F.M.I. 2014
  18. 18. POINTING DEVICES DIRECT • Light pen • Touch screen • Stylus 21 L.F.M.I. 2014 INDIRECT • Mouse • Trackball • Joystick • Graphic tablet • Touchpad
  19. 19. A NEW IDEA 22 L.F.M.I. 2014
  20. 20. CHOOSING DEVICES • Match physiological & psychological characteristics • Appropriate for task • Suitable for the work & environment • Left and/or right handed • All kinds of special needs, from slight long sight to severe motor/visual/ cognitive disability 23 L.F.M.I. 2014
  21. 21. ALTERNATIVES Gaze input - via reflections of laser beam aimed at retina. Here with pointing via data glove 24 L.F.M.I. 2014 Brain activity input - this neural network system distinguishes 5 brain patterns - for up, down, L, R & click
  22. 22. DISPLAY TECHNOLOGY • • • • • • • • Monochrome displays RGB shadow-mask displays Raster-scan cathode-ray tube (CRT) Liquid-crystal displays (lcds) Plasma panel Light-emitting diodes (leds) Electronic ink Braille displays 25 L.F.M.I. 2014
  23. 23. GAME CONSOLE 26 L.F.M.I. 2014

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