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Real Men Read Book Drive

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It is the season of giving and California Baptist University students can join in by donating any old or unwanted books to the Career Center’s Real Men Read program. The Career Center is partnering with CBU’s Phi Beta Lambda division from Nov. 30 through Dec. 11 to promote the book drive, intended to aid at-risk youths and the Riverside community. Hunter Taylor, Riverside deputy district attorney, created Real Men Read as a means to tackle and prevent juvenile crime in Riverside County. By meeting with at-risk juveniles both in and out of juvenile hall, the Real Men Read initiative aims to inspire young men to take up and gain a real interest in reading books outside of the classroom to deter them from spending their time in other, often harmful ways. “The program was created because a staggering amount of adult and juvenile offenders lack basic reading skills and positive role models,” Taylor said. From historic novels to fantasy fiction to children’s books, students can stop by the Career Center to drop off books in the boxes that are available. Joseph Chan, 2014 CBU alumnus, was the founder of Phi Beta Lambda. He said the student organization, as well as the Career Center, aims to promote servant leadership and professional development, which is why both organizations are working together to promote the program. Kyle Sugimura, senior business administration major and vice president of marketing for Phi Beta Lambda, created the book drive after interning for the Riverside County DA’s office and shadowing Taylor. He said that he has seen the positive impact the program has had on young juveniles and the community in general. “Every time one of the kids is reading a book, they’re drawn away from possibly going out and being confronted with a situation that could land them in trouble,” Sugimura said. There is also scientific evidence to support how reading can help youths avoid developing a negative lifestyle and deter them from getting into trouble. Sugimura said according to the National Assessment of Adult Literacy, 85 percent of correctional facilities are filled with illiterate people and there is a direct correlation between criminal relapse and illiteracy. “The kids’ reading builds their literacy, which is shown to decrease the recidivism,” Sugimura said. By donating books, students are giving back to the community and helping to improve lives of at-risk youths. Each student or faculty member that donates will also receive a raffle ticket for a prize when they donate. “Books being donated is the most important thing that students can do to contribute, because the larger the book selection Real Men Reads has, the more likely the youth will be engaged and committed to the program,” Sugimura said. Taylor also reiterated the important impact that students can have on the program. “With the help of CBU students, programs like Real Men Read will continue to grow and prosper, making our community a better and safer

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Real Men Read Book Drive

  1. 1. The Switch-On Ceremony began the start of the annu- al Riverside Festival of Lights Nov. 27. The historic festive event is intended to usher in the Christmas spirit. What started in 1992 as a small and simple Christmas lighting ceremony has now be- come an annual tradition that attracts thousands of people from all over the state. The event has been ranked by People Magazine as the sec- ond best lighting ceremony and by USA Today as the No. 1 best public lights display in the United States. Brenda Flowers, project co- ordinator for the city of River- side, explained the initial idea came 23 years ago from a visit to Sendai, Japan, by Dwayne Roberts, the former owner of the Mission Inn Hotel and Spa. “(Roberts) and the then mayor (of Riverside), went to Sendai, Japan, which is one of our sister cities,” Flowers said. “They have a festival of lights there, so they thought they should do something like that here in Riverside. So that started the process and it grew from there.” The 23rd annual Switch- on Ceremony transformed downtown Riverside into a dazzling array of over three million illuminating festive lights and was followed by an elaborate fireworks display. Stephanie Davis, sopho- more health science major, at- tended the event last year. “It was more than I expect- ed,” Davis said. “Everything was covered in lights, and I mean ev- erything.” The Festival of Lights helps to create a Christmas holiday atmosphere. Davis said stu- dents can expect a really unique experience. “It’s crazy how many lights and how much effort probably goes into creating the event,” she said. NoemiPonce,juniornursing major, also attended last year and mentioned the other events the festival has to offer, includ- ing food booths and an ice skat- ing rink. Ponce also said she loves attending. It is a great event to spend time with friends and family throughout the holiday season. “Students can expect to have a good time and will get to see all the Christmas lighting,” Ponce said. Shelby Freise, sophomore marketing major, said students can go expecting a great bond- ing experience. “(There are) nutcrackers in the window, reindeer and serv- ings of hot cocoa and cider,” Freise said. Other events include per- sonal photos with Santa Claus and horse carriage rides. Ar- tisan Collectives will also be there. It is an innovative arts market that allows people to participate in free public art workshops and local entertain- ment from various musicians. Students can also sign up and apply to provide musical entertainment for the event on the Riverside Festival of Lights website. The event will take place at the Mission Inn Hotel and Spa in downtown Riverside from Nov. 27 to Jan. 2. 2 December 4, 2015 · Volume 63 · Issue 6 NEWS It is the season of giving and California Baptist University students can join in by donat- ing any old or unwanted books to the Career Center’s Real Men Read program. The Career Center is part- nering with CBU’s Phi Beta Lambda division from Nov. 30 through Dec. 11 to promote the book drive, intended to aid at- risk youths and the Riverside community. Hunter Taylor, Riverside deputy district attorney, creat- ed Real Men Read as a means to tackle and prevent juvenile crime in Riverside County. By meeting with at-risk juveniles both in and out of juvenile hall, the Real Men Read initiative aims to inspire young men to take up and gain a real interest in reading books outside of the classroom to deter them from spending their time in other, of- ten harmful ways. “The program was created because a staggering amount of adult and juvenile offenders lack basic reading skills and positive role models,” Taylor said. From historic novels to fan- tasy fiction to children’s books, students can stop by the Career Center to drop off books in the boxes that are available. Joseph Chan, 2014 CBU alumnus, was the founder of Phi Beta Lambda. He said the stu- dent organization, as well as the Career Center, aims to promote servant leadership and pro- fessional development, which is why both organizations are working together to promote the program. Kyle Sugimura, senior busi- ness administration major and vice president of marketing for Phi Beta Lambda, created the book drive after interning for the Riverside County DA’s office and shadowing Taylor. He said that he has seen the positive impact the program has had on young juveniles and the com- munity in general. “Every time one of the kids is reading a book, they’re drawn away from possibly going out and being confronted with a sit- uation that could land them in trouble,” Sugimura said. There is also scientific evi- dence to support how reading can help youths avoid devel- oping a negative lifestyle and deter them from getting into trouble. Sugimura said accord- ing to the National Assessment of Adult Literacy, 85 percent of correctional facilities are filled with illiterate people and there is a direct correlation between criminal relapse and illiteracy. “The kids’ reading builds their literacy, which is shown to decrease the recidivism,” Sugimura said. By donating books, students are giving back to the communi- ty and helping to improve lives of at-risk youths. Each student or faculty member that donates will also receive a raffle ticket for a prize when they donate. “Books being donated is the most important thing that students can do to contribute, because the larger the book se- lection Real Men Reads has, the more likely the youth will be engaged and committed to the program,” Sugimura said. Taylor also reiterated the important impact that students can have on the program. “With the help of CBU stu- dents, programs like Real Men Read will continue to grow and prosper, making our commu- nity a better and safer place to live,” he said. Festival lights up downtown Real Men Read supports at-risk youth Conner Schuh | Banner The entrance to the Mission Inn during the Festival of Lights is decked out with lights, mistletoe and Santa Claus meet-and-greets for members of the Riverside community and visitors from all over the state to enjoy. The festival began on Nov. 27 and will run through Jan. 2. BY DAVIDA BRENDA ASST. NEWS EDITOR Suspect in Paris attack believed to be in Syria New details emerged that a suspect in the Paris at- tacks, Salah Abdeslam, had purchased detonators from a fireworks shop before the Nov. 13 attacks. French sources, however, have saidBelgian-bornAbde- slam escaped to Syria. CNN reported the ring- leader, Abdelhamid Abaaoud, and another man were plan- ning another suicide attack on the Paris financial district of La Defense and in Jewish areas and schools. Russia accuses Turkey of shooting down warplane for ISIS oil Russian President Vlad- imir Putin has condemned Turkey for downing one of their jets that killed a Rus- sian pilot and injured an- other. Turkey has not apol- ogized for the incident and has denied any ties to ISIS, as they say the jet entered their air space. On Nov. 30, the U.S. State Department said evidence from U.S. sources show the Russian aircraft did violate Turkish airspace. Climate change summit held in Paris Colorado shooting kills three and injures nine Kobe Bryant announces end-of-season retirement A police officer and two civilians were killed and nine others injured at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colora- do Springs, Colorado, after suspect Robert Lewis Dear opened fire Friday, Nov. 27. Dear, 57, surrendered to officials after a six-hour standoff. He said he has an- ti-abortion and anti-govern- mentviews;however,itisnot clear if these views were his motivation for the shooting. Five-time NBA champi- on Kobe Bryant announced Nov. 29 he will retire from his career in professional basketball at the end of the Los Angeles Lakers’ current season. Bryant has been with the Lakers for 20 years and an- nounced his decision by a poem he posted on the Play- ers Tribune Website. Bryant has been ranked third on the NBA’s all-time scorers list and is a two-time Olympic gold medalist. NEWS BRIEFS Leaders of 150 nations, including President Barack Obama, met in Paris Nov. 30 for climate change talks at the United Nations COP21 debate. The annual forum aimed to find ways to tackle climate change on a global, political level. The mission of the sum- mit is to agree on ways to le- gally reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases. China and the U.S. are the largest pro- ducers of greenhouse gases. Obama said the U.S. recog- nizes this and is trying to re- solve the issue. Conner Schuh | Banner Nutcrackers are displayed on some of the windows of the Mission Inn in Riverside, with more lights, garlands and dec- orations for Festival of Lights goers to enjoy. “ Students can expect to have a good time and will get to see all the Christmas lighting. Noemi Ponce, junior nursing major The Career Center partners with Phi Beta Lambda to conduct book drive aiding juvenile males in the Riverside community CBU alumnus killed in traffic accident Nov. 14 Sudi Nsengiyumva, 22-year- old California Baptist Univer- sity alumnus, died Nov. 18 from injuries sustained by being struck by a car while crossing a street around 9:30 p.m. Nov. 14 in Costa Mesa. CBU hosted a memorial, remembering and celebrat- ing Nsengiyumva’s life, Nov. 20 in Innovators Auditorium. In attendance were members of his host family, members of the CBU community that he worked with through Infor- mation & Technology Services, friends, faculty members and students who wished to give their condolences. Nsengiyumva began attend- ing CBU in 2011 and graduated May 2015 with a bachelor’s de- gree in electrical and computer engineering. He was an inter- national student from Rwan- da and a Rwanda Presidential Scholar. Friends, family members and faculty gave speeches at the memorial and a short mes- sage from the President of the Rwandan Community in Northern California was read. Several Rwandan women led the attendees with a collection of hymns and John Mont- gomery, dean of Spiritual Life, gave a short sermon. Part of Nsengiyumva’s pas- sion for his trade began when he got a job working with ITS at CBU. Maksym Kozak, senior business management ma- jor, recalled the good times he shared with Nsengiyumva while they worked together in the ITS department. “He was a part of our crew and he was the life of the par- ty,” Kozak said. “His smile al- ways made my day. He knew how to cheer someone up even if he wasn’t having a good day.” After graduation, Nsengi- yumva began to work for the solar company Sunrun in Irvine and was staying with his American host family in Orange County at the time of his death. He is survived by his fa- ther, his stepmother and two younger brothers who live in Rwanda. A GoFundMe titled “Sudi’s Medical Fund” has been set up to raise funds for the family to cover medical and transportation costs. BY DAVIDA BRENDA ASST. NEWS EDITOR

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