A Review of an Empirical Turbine 
Noise Prediction Method
Noise Prediction Method
                              Kyle Grose...
Objective
 Investigate the physics behind the empirical turbine 
 noise prediction method presented by Bruce Morin 
 and O...
Why is Turbine Noise Important?
 As noise reduction technology has progressed, once dominant noise 
 sources that used to ...
Turbine Noise Generation Mechanisms
 There are two types of generation mechanisms for turbine noise: 
 potential field int...
Potential Field Interactions
 Potential Field Interactions
    Solid bodies in free stream flow create potential fields
  ...
Blade‐wake Interactions
 Blade‐wake interactions occur when viscous wakes are shed off of 
 either rotor blades or stator ...
M i At i M d l
Morin‐Atassi Model
OAPWL Due to Airfoil Row
  Morin‐Atassi model assumes turbine noise is 
  dominated by b...
M i A      iM d l
Morin‐Atassi Model
Where do the Parameters Come From
  Even though this is an empirical model there need...
Unsteady Forces on a Blade Due to
Unsteady Forces on a Blade Due to 
Viscous Wake
 Kemp and Sears wrote a paper “Unsteady ...
U     d F            Bl d
Unsteady Forces on a Blade
Kemp and Sear Upwash Equation & Lift Equation

Upwash is Dependent up...
M i A      i
Morin‐Atassi 
Kemp and Sears Contribution
  Simplified CD = Pressure Loss Coefficient (ξ)




          W = P...
U     d F            Bl d
Unsteady Forces on a Blade
Osborne Compressible Model
  Osborne wrote a paper “Compressible Unst...
M i At i M d l
Morin‐Atassi Model
OAPWL for Turbine Stage
  OAPWL before described for a single airfoil, the 
  OAPWL for ...
OAPWL f T bi S
OAPWL for Turbine Stage
Additional Terms
  Along with the superposition of blade‐wake interactions, there i...
OAPWL
      Discrete Frequency and “Haystack” Components
             OAPWL represents both the discrete frequency and 
  ...
Turbine Tones and Haystack Generation
              Turbine Tones
                     Turbine tones occur because of the ...
OAPWL
      Tonal and Haystack Level
             Tonal level is found by directly applying the OAPWL model
             B...
G.E. Empirical Model
 Kazin and Matta formulated an empirical model for 
 turbine prediction in the 1970’s.  It is still p...
Morin‐Atassi vs. Kazin‐Matta
 Morin‐Atassi

                                        X        X
 Kazin‐Matta

             ...
M i A      i
      Morin‐Atassi
      Prediction vs. Measured
             Used Pratt & Whitney measured data to obtain 
 ...
Comparison of Different Empirical
       Comparison of Different Empirical 
       Methods
              In 1975, Mathews ...
Conclusions
 Morin‐Atassi method appears to have strong ties to 
 blade‐wake interaction theory
 Before a definitive concl...
References
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Review of an Empirical Turbine Noise Prediction Method

1,211 views

Published on

This was my final presentation for my Aeroacoustics course at Purdue

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,211
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
31
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Review of an Empirical Turbine Noise Prediction Method

  1. 1. A Review of an Empirical Turbine  Noise Prediction Method Noise Prediction Method Kyle Grose AAE 615
  2. 2. Objective Investigate the physics behind the empirical turbine  noise prediction method presented by Bruce Morin  and Oliver Atassi at the 2008 AARC Turbine Noise  Workshop Compare against the popular G.E. empirical turbine  Compare against the popular G E  empirical turbine  prediction Investigate how the Morin‐Atassi Prediction Model  g compares against measured data.
  3. 3. Why is Turbine Noise Important? As noise reduction technology has progressed, once dominant noise  sources that used to mask lesser noise sources have become  suppressed. Lesser noise sources, such as the turbine, are now significant  contributors to community noise especially in the approach  condition Typical Engine Noise Component Distribution Figure from Mathews Combustion Approach Condition And Turbine Noise Work at Pratt &Whitney Presented at Core Noise Workshop in Phoenix, AZ February 2003
  4. 4. Turbine Noise Generation Mechanisms There are two types of generation mechanisms for turbine noise:  potential field interactions and blade‐wake interactions Figure from Morin and Atassi An Empirical Model For Turbine Noise Prediction presented at  AARC Turbine Noise Workshop in Vancouver, BC May 2008
  5. 5. Potential Field Interactions Potential Field Interactions Solid bodies in free stream flow create potential fields Potential fields can travel and interact with other objects or other flow  j phenomena Flow passing by a stator will cause a potential field that can travel upstream  and impinge upon the upstream rotor row causing pressure fluctuations  therefore generating noise th f   ti   i Potential field tends to decay rapidly and because of blade spacing in  turbine stages the potential fields cause weak excitations Blade‐wake Interactions are often seen as the dominant noise  generation mechanism of turbine noise
  6. 6. Blade‐wake Interactions Blade‐wake interactions occur when viscous wakes are shed off of  either rotor blades or stator vanes and interact with either stator or  rotor blades next to it. The wakes impinging on the blade cause unsteady lift forces on the blade  Th   k  i i i    th  bl d     t d  lift f    th  bl d   which generates noise Viscous wakes do not decay as fast as a potential field. Viscous wakes are  the dominant noise source. the dominant noise source Figure from M.J.T. Smith  Aircraft Noise,  Cambridge University Press, New York, 1989
  7. 7. M i At i M d l Morin‐Atassi Model OAPWL Due to Airfoil Row Morin‐Atassi model assumes turbine noise is  dominated by blade wakes For a single row of airfoils the sound power produced is  F    i l     f  i f il   h   d    d d i   dependent on the following: Sound Power Upwash Annulus Area Pressure Loss Factor Temperature Spacing/Chord Ratio Pressure Duct Mach Number p, q, and r are empirical constants
  8. 8. M i A iM d l Morin‐Atassi Model Where do the Parameters Come From Even though this is an empirical model there needs to  be rationale behind the parameters chosen Curle’s Equation Pressure is dependent upon the force What is the force due to a viscous wake on a blade?
  9. 9. Unsteady Forces on a Blade Due to Unsteady Forces on a Blade Due to  Viscous Wake Kemp and Sears wrote a paper “Unsteady Forces Due  to Viscous Wakes in Turbomachinery” (1955) Described the upwash on a blade due to a viscous wake  as dependent upon drag coefficient (CD) and  spacing/chord ratio (s/b) in an incompressible flow h d ( b) bl fl Lift is dependent upon the upwash p p p Therefore unsteady force dependent upon CD and  (s/b) ( b)
  10. 10. U d F Bl d Unsteady Forces on a Blade Kemp and Sear Upwash Equation & Lift Equation Upwash is Dependent upon  CD and (s/b) ( / ) Upwash Lift Lift is Dependent upon CD and (s/b)
  11. 11. M i A i Morin‐Atassi  Kemp and Sears Contribution Simplified CD = Pressure Loss Coefficient (ξ) W = P*A Where Do These (assuming free‐field) Come From? Kemp‐Sear’s Lift Model
  12. 12. U d F Bl d Unsteady Forces on a Blade Osborne Compressible Model Osborne wrote a paper “Compressible Unsteady  Interactions Between Blade Rows” (1972) Compressibility is Important.  There is significant  C ibili  i  I   Th  i   i ifi   impact on lift fluctuations by varying Mach number Lift Model for Compressible Flow Upwash from Sears‐Kemp V = Mc p = ρRT c = sqrt(γRT ) Lift dependent upon T1/2, p, M, (s/b), and ξ
  13. 13. M i At i M d l Morin‐Atassi Model OAPWL for Turbine Stage OAPWL before described for a single airfoil, the  OAPWL for a turbine stage is the following: Upstream Vane Wake/Blade Interaction Blade Wake/Downstream Vane Interaction
  14. 14. OAPWL f T bi S OAPWL for Turbine Stage Additional Terms Along with the superposition of blade‐wake interactions, there is also  the inclusion of K,C, and τ K – Modal Cut‐On/Cut‐Off Parameter K  Modal Cut On/Cut Off Parameter Not all modes creating from interaction couple with duct mode If mode is “cut‐on” K = 1, if “cut‐off” K=0. τ – Transmission Loss Coefficient Modes propagating downstream will interact with other blade row Energy may get scattered Transmission coefficient is the portion of the initial energy generated  T i i   ffi i t i  th   ti   f th  i iti l    t d  by the blade‐wake interaction that makes it to the farfield C – Additional Empirical Coefficient p
  15. 15. OAPWL Discrete Frequency and “Haystack” Components OAPWL represents both the discrete frequency and  broadband level Two components to turbine noise T       bi   i Discrete Frequency (turbine tones) Broadband (Haystacks) Figure from Mathews Combustion And Turbine Noise Work at Pratt & Whitney Presented at Core Noise Workshop in Phoenix, AZ February 2003
  16. 16. Turbine Tones and Haystack Generation Turbine Tones Turbine tones occur because of the periodic  interaction of the rotating rotor blades with  the stator vanes h     Fig. 1 Fi   Haystacks Haystacks occur external to the turbine As the tone propagates out the exhaust, it  p p g , moves through the fan/ambient shear layer Turbulence in this layer causes the tone to  modulate and spectrally spread out. “Haystacks” are generated Fig. 2 Figure 2 from Mathews Combustion And Turbine Noise Work at Pratt & Whitney Figure 1 from M.J.T. Smith  Aircraft Noise,  Presented at Core Noise Workshop in Phoenix, AZ Cambridge University Press, New York, 1989 February 2003
  17. 17. OAPWL Tonal and Haystack Level Tonal level is found by directly applying the OAPWL model Because of complexity of the tonal modulation, an  envelope was empirically derived to describe the haystack  spectral shape. Measured data was analyzed and a mean curve was created for  the Haystack envelope  Figure from Morin and Atassi An Empirical Model For Turbine Noise Prediction presented at  AARC Turbine Noise Workshop in Vancouver, BC May 2008
  18. 18. G.E. Empirical Model Kazin and Matta formulated an empirical model for  turbine prediction in the 1970’s.  It is still popular and  found in many papers. found in many papers SPL prediction for both tonal and broadband levels Have another equation for the peak SPL level (tonal  component) Subtract the peak SPL from the OASPL to find  p broadband level
  19. 19. Morin‐Atassi vs. Kazin‐Matta Morin‐Atassi X X Kazin‐Matta X ΔT / T = 1 − (1 / ξ )^ (γ − 1/γ ) Kazin Matta Kazin‐Matta recognized significance in blade spacing but did not include it in  their model Kazin‐Matta rely on the relative blade velocity as opposed the duct Mach  number in the Morin‐Atassi model Even though they both attempt to predict the same thing, there are major  Even though they both attempt to predict the same thing  there are major  differences between the two
  20. 20. M i A i Morin‐Atassi Prediction vs. Measured Used Pratt & Whitney measured data to obtain  empirical constants and “haystack” spectral shapes Inferred transmission loss coefficients for the various  I f d  i i  l   ffi i  f   h   i   turbine stages Obtained good  correlation between  the measured and  predicted results Figure from Morin and Atassi An Empirical Model For Turbine Noise Prediction presented at  AARC Turbine Noise Workshop in Vancouver, BC May 2008
  21. 21. Comparison of Different Empirical Comparison of Different Empirical  Methods In 1975, Mathews and Nagel conducted a review of turbine  noise prediction methods used at NASA, G.E., Pratt &  Whitney and Rolls‐Royce Discovered that the prediction for a single engine varied  d h h d f l d widely across the groups involved in the review Though the Morin‐Atassi g method might correlate  well with P&W data, it  might not work as well  when predicting turbine  noise for a different engine Figure from Mathews, et al  “Review of Theory and Methods for Turbine Noise Prediction,” AIAA Paper No. 75‐540, 1975
  22. 22. Conclusions Morin‐Atassi method appears to have strong ties to  blade‐wake interaction theory Before a definitive conclusion can be made on the  B f    d fi i i   l i    b   d     h   accuracy of the model, the model needs to be  validated against a variety of engines. validated against a variety of engines
  23. 23. References

×