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THANKS
MANY
Jake B. Schrum ’68 and
Jane Woodman Schrum ’70
spring 2013
Science has changed. Our facilities have not. Constructed
in 1954, parts of Fondren-Jones Science Hall have yet to
see renovation. While Southwestern has renowned science
faculty, state-of-the-art equipment and eager students, the
building itself is in dire need of an update.
A $1 million challenge grant Southwestern received from
the J.E. and L.E. Mabee Foundation of Tulsa, Okla., allows
gifts of any amount made this year toward Phase I of the
science center renovation to be matched dollar-for-dollar.
Make a gift today to help break ground later this year on
Phase I of the new science center and help provide an
enhanced science program for the students of tomorrow.
$1MILLIONSCIENCECHALLENGETogether, we can help Southwestern progress...twice as fast
Every Gift Matters! Visit www.southwestern.edu/phase1gift to make a gift today!
1962 1982 2012
spring 2013
Features	
	6	 |	 a (very) personal legacy
Southwestern’s 14th President
Jake B. Schrum ’68 is known for
his love of students and his passion
for the liberal arts.
	14	|	 beyond beta
Paideia connects the dots between the
classroom, the community and the world
for a unique interdisciplinary, intentional
and integrated academic experience.
	18	|	 Be(ing) Southwestern
The Association of Southwestern
University Alumni presents five
alumni and faculty with 2012
distinguished awards.
In every issue
	 4	 President’s Message
	 20	 On Campus
	 22	 Athletics
	 24	 Class Notes
	 30	 Last Word
3spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu
On the Cover
Southwestern University’s
14th President Jake B.
Schrum ’68, with Jane
Woodman Schrum ’70
Photography by Lance Holt
Clusterfest Bands
Announced
Students and staff run to catch ping
pong balls for prizes at the annual
announcement of the Clusterfest
lineup. www.clusterfest.com
University Relations
Office of Communications
Associate Vice President, Communications
Cindy Locke
Director, Creative
Eric Bumgardner
Assistant Director, Writer/Editor
Kristina W. Moore
Assistant Director, Senior Designer
Antonio Banda
Director, News and Media Relations
Ellen Davis
Director, Web Development and Communications
John Kotarski ’93
Associate Director, New Media
Danielle Brown Stapleton ’05
magazine@southwestern.edu
University Relations
Office of alumni and parents
Associate Vice President, Alumni and Parents
Megan Radison Frisque
Senior Associate Director, Alumni and Parents
JoAnn Lucero
Associate Director, Alumni and Parents
Grace Josey Pyka ’05
alumni@southwestern.edu
parents@southwestern.edu
Chief administrative officers
Jake B. Schrum ’68, President
Richard L. Anderson, Vice President for Fiscal Affairs
Gerald Brody, Vice President for Student Life
James W. Hunt, Provost and Dean of the Faculty
Beverly Jones, University Chaplain
W. Joseph King ’93, Vice President for Innovation
C. Richard McKelvey, Vice President for University Relations
Pamela McQuesten, Vice President for Information Services
and Chief Information Officer
Francie Schroeder, Executive Assistant to the President
Ronald L. Swain, Senior Adviser to the President for
Strategic Planning and Assessment
Dave Voskuil, Vice President for Enrollment Services
CONTACTS
Main: (512) 863-6511
Alumni and Parents: (800) 960-6363
Office of Admission: (800) 252-3166
Southwestern is published semiannually by the Office of
University Relations, and printed on Euroart Dull Text by
TWG Plus. Bulk rate postage paid at Austin, Texas.
“Paideia will make
Southwestern unique
among liberal arts
colleges.”
	 —Jimmy Smith
	 Professor of Kinesiology
quoted...
T
hirteen years seem to have gone by in
the blink of an eye. And yet, so much
has happened at Southwestern during
my time as President. In a decade brack-
eted by the tragedy of 9/11 and the stock
market crash of 2008, our campus
community has, together, been able to accomplish
much that is good.
With the “Thinking Ahead” Campaign at just over
$144 million, we have received more gifts and pledges
than at any other time in our history. As our student
enrollment has grown to 1,400 and our alumni annual
giving has increased, we’ve built and renovated build-
ings, endowed the future of Paideia—one of the most
distinctive programs in higher education—maintained
an “A” rating with Moody’s and balanced the budget
each year. We’ve also made real commitments to diver-
sity and sustainability, revised the curriculum, and
moved the endowment back onto an upward path.
Satisfaction surveys by Southwestern students are
stronger than ever and our ranking is once again
moving upward on national lists. We have done all
of this by working together for the betterment of
Southwestern. While we see even greater possibili-
ties for the future, particularly in the areas of collab-
oration and innovation, there are still challenges to
be met. The financial model for higher education is
broken and structural deficits must be tackled.
Although there’s always more to do and more to
accomplish, I can rest assured that for the past 13
years, I have poured myself into this work; I have
not held back; I have given it my all. Southwestern
deserves nothing less.
Thank you for giving Jane and me the opportu-
nity to serve this transformational institution and for
giving Southwestern your hard work and devotion.
May the University not only flourish, but also be, as
Jimmy Carter stated on April 4, 2001—my inaugura-
tion day—a place “that creates an environment which
nourishes the soul.”
Truly, our loyal voices have blended to sing of
Southwestern’s fame. May our calling to educate the
mind and the heart continue for countless years.
Jake B. Schrum ’68
President
Loyal Voices
Blend To Sing
4 Southwestern Magazine
president’s message
5spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu
Come Be Southwestern at Homecoming and
Reunion Weekend 2013! For alumni, it’s the place
to rediscover connections to friends, faculty and
staff. For parents, it’s an opportunity to interact
with the greater Southwestern community. We hope
everyone returns November 1–3 and shares their
experiences with others! Your lifelong Southwestern
Experience continues.
	 Alumni Homecoming Chair: Susan Peace Holley ’73
	Student Homecoming Chair: Lucero Piña, Class of 2015
www.sualumni.net/Homecoming2013
Wondering what to expect?
o	Academic receptions
o	Alumni Awards presentation
o	Class reunions
o	Family Day
o	Football game
o	Friday Night Live
o	Homecoming Hospitality House
o	Jameson 5K
o	Lifelong Learning elements
o	Memorial Worship Service
o	Parade and pep rally
o	Picnic
o	Pirate Golf Classic
o	Soccer tournament
o	Student organization fair and reception
o	Student work showcase
o	Tailgating
o	Volleyball tournament
PERSONAL
LEGACY
A VERY
6 Southwestern Magazine
ver time, that realization
became one of her fondest
memories. She shares, “I like
to keep my desk clear. Jake is
what I would call a ‘stacker’;
he keeps organized by making
stacks of papers. I once asked
if he wanted me to clear his
desk when I returned from my
vacation if he didn’t have time to do it before leaving
on his own vacation. He reassured me that his desk
would be clean. Lo and behold, when I returned, his
desk was clear; not a piece of paper anywhere. Then,
I looked down and all around me on the floor were
his stacks. I just stood there and laughed.”
Schroeder’s story exemplifies the personal relation-
ships that Schrum is known for developing with nearly
everyone he meets.
Caring, genuine, personal, willing and eager,
involved, creative, committed, people person,
welcoming, thoughtful, passionate about the liberal
arts, friend — these are only a few of the ways friends,
family, colleagues and community members describe
both Schrum and his wife, Jane Woodman Schrum ’70.
Known for his unplanned conversations with
students as they walk to class or eat lunch in Mabee
Commons, Jake—as he prefers to be called rather
than President Schrum—has an unparalleled love
for Southwestern, its students and the things that are
important to them.
His brother, Everett (Ev) Schrum ’70, says, “Jake is
the most caring person I know; he cares not only about
his family but about the community, the environment,
the world...and especially about the Southwestern
students.
One of the first students with whom Jake connected
as President was Emily Stewart ’04, a first-year room-
mate of his daughter Katie Schrum ’04. Prior to
arriving on campus, Stewart got a call from Katie
saying, “I should tell you that my dad is the new pres-
ident of Southwestern.” Even so, she didn’t expect
that her first meeting with Jake would be when she
walked into her room in Kurth Hall and found him
vacuuming. “I didn’t even realize it was him,” she
says, “until he said, ‘Hi, Emily, I’m Jake Schrum.’” Now
close friends with the Schrum family, Stewart says
that whether she is visiting the Southwestern campus
or Katie in Atlanta or Libby Schrum ’00 in Maine,
“Spending time with (them) always feels like coming
home.” She especially likes that “Jake always has a
joke for me—usually a pun!”
Audrey Tinsley Hukari ’06 met Jake when she trans-
ferred to Southwestern. She recalls that she would see
him around campus, always approachable and often
striking up conversations with students. “I always
felt that even though I was just one of 1,300 or so
students on campus, President Schrum cared about my
(personal) success and experience at Southwestern,”
she says, adding that “Jake and Jane’s love for
Southwestern and the students is unparalleled.”
David Briner ’13 had an experience not unlike
Stewart’s or Hukari’s some 10 years ago. He says,
“President Schrum’s unquestionable commitment to
making everyone feel welcome on campus from the
moment they arrive until long after they leave has
helped to better students’ experiences and is a priv-
ilege rarely offered at other prestigious universities.”
Schroeder adds, “Jake is always willing and eager to
help students with their career and advanced educa-
tional goals; each year he writes numerous recom-
mendations and reference letters and helps arrange
contacts for Southwestern students and acquaintances
alike.”
Professor Emeritus of Mathematics John Chapman
says, “Jake has guided students both in their academic
studies and in their community service, indicating
relationship between the two. The students appreciate
that he makes a point of meeting them as they move
into their dorms or eating with them in the cafeteria
and showing an interest in their lives.”
Non Quis Sed Quid
Jim Walzel, a member of Southwestern’s Board of
Trustees, says, “Jake is a great people person and a
great spokesperson for the University. He’s accom-
plished many significant things over the years.”
While leading the largest fundraising effort in
Southwestern history—the $150 million “Thinking
When Jake B. Schrum ’68 became President of
Southwestern University in 2000, his executive
assistant, Francie Schroeder, quickly realized that
the two of them had very different work habits.
O
Known and loved for his
personable nature and
sincere interest in the lives of
Southwestern students, faculty
and staff, “Jake is always willing
and eager to help students...”
(opposite).	
Serious or smiling —
administrative head shots from
Jake’s tenure as Vice President
of Development (above).
7spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu
Ahead” Campaign—Jake, with guidance from Provost
Jim Hunt, envisioned a unique addition to the curric-
ulum designed to help students integrate what they
learn in the classroom with outside experiences
such as civic engagement, intercultural learning
and collaborative research projects. Jake’s ability
to help secure an $8.5 million gift from the Priddy
Charitable Trust enabled Southwestern to add the
faculty members necessary to implement the orig-
inal Paideia Program. Now the signature element of
the University’s academic program, Paideia will be
available to and required of all students in the fall
of 2014. (See Page 14.)
Jake has also overseen the renovation of several
campus buildings, including The Alma Thomas Fine
Arts Center and the Roy and Lillie Cullen Building, as
well as the construction of The Wilhelmina Cullen
Admission Center and the Charles and Elizabeth
Prothro Center for Lifelong Learning. Both newly
constructed buildings earned LEED certification, exem-
plifying Southwestern’s commitment to sustainability.
Sustainability has long been a focus of Southwestern
students and subsequently of the Schrum presi-
dency. Jake was an early signer of both the Talloires
Declaration (an international effort to promote
environmental sustainability in higher education)
and the College and University Presidents’ Climate
Commitment. Student-led sustainability initiatives
encouraged by Jake led to an agreement with the city
of Georgetown enabling Southwestern to get all of
its electricity from wind power for the next 18 years.
Another priority of Jake’s presidency has been
enhancing student life on campus, including the
expansion of Southwestern’s varsity athletics offerings.
Four new teams were started or announced during
his tenure—softball, men’s and women’s lacrosse,
and football.
He has also worked continually on increasing
the number of Southwestern students from under-
represented groups. During his 13-year tenure, that
number increased from 21.8 percent to 30 percent,
and currently includes 18 percent Latino students.
According to Georgetown Mayor George Garver,
“Jake has helped lead a great liberal arts university with
a gentle manner that radiates courtesy, good listening
skills and creative insight.”
Chapman adds, “It has been marvelous to work
for and with one who is an intellectual, who under-
stands the liberal arts education, and who is a believer
in academic freedom.”
Town/Gown Relations
Beyond campus, Jake is a friend of the city of
Georgetown. Former Mayor Gary Nelon says as
Southwestern’s new president in 2000, Jake “hit the
city by storm.” Thinking at the time that Georgetown
was a town with a college, rather than a college
town, Jake has worked tirelessly during his 13 years
as President to improve and maintain close “town/
gown relations” with the city.
Jake’s approachability helped him to “immediately
fit right into the Georgetown life,” says Nell Benold ’48.
To this day, he enjoys almost daily visits with patrons
of the coffee shop on the Georgetown Square.
An enthusiastic spokesperson for the University,
many credit Jake with contributing greatly to
connecting Southwestern and Georgetown more
closely. “The relationship he helped to establish
between the University and the city,” says Nelon, “will
continue as a legacy to Jake long after his retirement.”
Chapman and his wife Scherry have been friends
with the Schrums since Jake was on the Southwestern
staff in the 1970s and Jane taught with Scherry at
Annie Purl Elementary School in Georgetown. They
say, “We are lucky to have had Jake and Jane as part
of our Southwestern life; bringing new programs to
the community, supporting the arts, and contributing
to the economic and cultural wealth of Georgetown.”
“I’ve learned that people
will forget what you said, people
will forget what you did, but
people will never forget how you
made them feel.” — Maya Angelou
8 Southwestern Magazine
2000
„	 Jake B. Schrum ’68 is elected
Southwestern’s 14th President
„	 Statement of Nondiscrimination and
Domestic Partners Benefits Policy is
added to existing policies in the Faculty,
Staff and Student Handbooks as well as
the University Catalog
„	 Author Joyce Carol Oates is the Writer’s
Voice speaker
„	 Southwestern is included in an updated
edition of the influential book Colleges
That Change Lives: 40 Schools That
Will Change the Way You Think About
Colleges by Loren Pope (Southwestern
was also included in the original version
published in 1996)
„	 W. Joseph “Joey” King ’93 donates
$500,000 to establish and endow the
King Creativity Fund to annually
support student projects
2001
„	 Jimmy Carter, 39th President of the
U.S., speaks at President Schrum’s
inauguration; 5,000 people are in
attendance. While on campus, Carter
speaks on “Moral Leadership in a Global
Society” as the Shilling Lecturer
„	 Author Russell Banks is the Writer’s
Voice speaker
„	 Justice for All, a book edited by
President Schrum, is published
2002
„	 Southwestern receives $8.5 million from
the Robert & Ruby Priddy Charitable Trust
of Wichita Falls, Texas to inaugurate the
Paideia Program
„	 Marian Wright Edelman, William Sloane
Coffin and John D. Maguire speak as the
Shilling Lecturers
„	 Author Michael Chabon, “one of the most
celebrated writers of his generation,” is
the Writer’s Voice speaker
„	 Princeton Review’s college guide rates
Southwestern the nation’s 4th “Best
Academic Bang for Your Buck” and one
of the nation’s best 345 colleges
A (short) Presidential Timeline
Garver agrees, “Both Jake and Jane have always been
willing to assist with any Georgetown function. We
are very thankful for their commitment to the city.”
Leading by Example
Over the course of 13 years, Jake received three
presidential leadership grants from The Mellon
Foundation and helped secure the relocation of the
National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education
(NITLE) to Southwestern in 2009.
Gene Tobin of The Mellon Foundation says, “The
Mellon Foundation’s association with Jake Schrum
began with a new president’s grant in 2001, near
the beginning of his tenure. This relationship has
evolved into a strong working partnership between the
Foundation and Southwestern toward a mutual goal:
the advancement, improvement and re-envisioning of
liberal arts education for a new era. Jake has passion-
ately supported undergraduate research, encouraged
faculty efforts to integrate civic engagement into the
curriculum, and actively collaborated with histori-
cally black colleges and universities, research universi-
ties, and Southwestern’s sister institutions within the
Associated Colleges of the South and the Council of
Independent Colleges. At a time when our country
has most needed thoughtful, persuasive and experi-
enced leaders, Jake has served Southwestern and the
higher education community with distinction. We
wish him the very best in the next chapter of his career,
and know that he will continue to be a strong voice
for educational quality and innovation.”
An outspoken advocate of the liberal arts, Jake has
written extensively on the topic. His brother Ev says,
“Jake’s involvement in higher education comes from
his concern that young adults are prepared to be
good citizens of our planet. He especially appreciates
the approach of liberal arts education that prepares
students by teaching them to think and engaging
them in the real world through actual contact with
persons through projects and field experiences. This
is why he is so passionate about our alma mater and
why he has worked so hard to continue to help make
Southwestern relevant.”
Known also for giving their all to their alma mater—
wisdom, time and monetary resources—Jake and
Jane often participate in or attend a University event
nearly every night of the week, as well as campus
9spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu
2003
„	 U.S. News and World Report ranks
Southwestern as one of “America’s
Best Colleges”
„	 The Paideia Program is launched
in September
„	 Jake B. Schrum is elected chair of the
Board of Directors of Independent
Colleges and Universities of Texas
„	 Southwestern faculty adds 10
new members
„	 Southwestern is listed in Barron’s 2003
Best Buys in College Education
„	 Fiske Guide to Colleges names
Southwestern among the best 295
colleges in the country
2004
„	 Nobel Peace Prize winner The
Archbishop Desmond Tutu speaks
as the Shilling Lecturer
„	 Southwestern receives $3 million
gift from The Cullen Trust for Higher
Education for the century-old Roy and
Lillie Cullen Building restoration
„	 Southwestern is awarded a $60,000
grant for collaborative work between
faculty and students in the Chemistry
and Biology Departments
„	 Playwright Tony Kushner is the Writer’s
Voice speaker
„	 Mike Timlin ’88 helps the Boston Red
Sox win the World Series
„	 The Princeton Review lists
Southwestern as the nation’s #7 “best
value” undergraduate institution
2005
„	 Pirate Bikes debut on campus in memory
of Walter “Wally” P. Meyer ’86
„	 The Perkins-Prothro Foundation gives
a gift for the building of the Charles
and Elizabeth Prothro Center for
Lifelong Learning
„	 Living/Learning Communities are
implemented for first-year students
„	 Former Prime Minister of Pakistan
Benazir Bhutto speaks as the
Shilling Lecturer
„	 Novelist Carlos Fuentes is the
Writer’s Voice speaker
Jake and Jane take a spin on a Pirate Bike built for two during
Homecoming and Reunion Weekend 2005 (top).
President Schrum dedicates the Charles and Elizabeth Prothro Center for
Lifelong Learning on March 11, 2010 (above).
10 Southwestern Magazine
„	 Southwestern is one of five schools given
full membership to the Institute for the
International Education of Students
2006
„	 “Pirate Cards” replace multiple card
systems across campus
„	 Southwestern joins the Hispanic
Association of Colleges and Universities
„	 Thomas H. Kean, chair of the 9/11
Commission, speaks as the Shilling
Lecturer
„	 Poet Robert Pinsky is the Writer’s
Voice speaker
„	 Southwestern is included in the third
edition of the book Colleges That
Change Lives
„	 A chapter of national leadership honor
society Omicron Delta Kappa is
chartered at Southwestern
„	 Southwestern launches “Thinking Ahead,”
the University’s largest-ever fundraising
campaign to fund priorities in the 2010
Strategic Plan
„	 To Survive and Excel: The Story of
Southwestern University 1840–2000
by Professor Emeritus of History
William B. Jones is published
2007
„	 President Schrum signs the Talloires
Declaration, adding Southwestern to the
growing number of colleges committed
to sustainable living
„	 James Baker III, former Secretary of
State, speaks as the Shilling Lecturer
„	 Author Amy Tan is the Writer’s
Voice speaker
„	 Southwestern is a founding
partner of the Texas Life Sciences
Commercialization Center in Georgetown
„	 Southwestern hosts inaugural Pirate
Golf Classic held annually during
Homecoming and Reunion Weekend
„	 The Princeton Review’s Best 366
Colleges ranks Southwestern #7 in
the country for Best Career/
Job Placement Services
„	 The SMArT (Science and Math
Achiever Teams) program begins with
Southwestern students mentoring local
elementary students
11spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu
2008
„	 Men’s intramural lacrosse club
becomes first university team in
Texas to advance to the varsity level
„	 Former U.S. Senator Bill Bradley
speaks as the Shilling Lecturer
„	 Author Azar Nafisi is the Writer’s
Voice speaker
„	 The newly opened Dorothy Manning
Lord Residential Center receives “Dorm
of Distinction” recognition by University
Business magazine
„	 Paideia scholars begin sending
refurbished computers to Honduras
„	 The women’s golf team finishes third
in NCAA Division III tournament
2009
„	 Wangari Maathai, the first African
woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize,
speaks as the Shilling Lecturer; President
Schrum signs the American College
and University Presidents Climate
Commitment during the lecture
„	 Southwestern’s first “green” building,
The Wilhelmina Cullen Admission Center,
opens and earns gold LEED certification
„	 Author Tobias Wolff is the Writer’s
Voice speaker
„	 Southwestern’s new varsity softball
team makes its home debut against
the University of Dallas
„	 The National Institute for Technology
	 in Liberal Education (NITLE) relocates
its headquarters to the Southwestern
campus; W. Joseph “Joey” King ’93
becomes the organization’s
executive director
„	 President Schrum receives Hall of Fame
Award from The National Hispanic
Institute, founded by Ernesto Nieto ’64
„	 Southwestern students revive the
Brooks Prize Debate
„	 The Princeton Review’s, The Best 371
Colleges, lists Southwestern one of the
“Easiest Campus to Get Around”
„	 The Chronicle of Higher Education lists
Southwestern as one of 150 Great
Colleges to Work For
and community commitments on weekends. The
Schrums also gave Southwestern the gift of the beau-
tiful window over the entrance doors to the Lois
Perkins Chapel.
Ev Schrum shares that he was a classmate of Jane’s
at Southwestern and says, “Jane has been, in her own
right, an advocate of positive causes and a supporter
of the things both she and Jake care about. My wife
and I consider them to be our best friends; it is good
when your relatives are also your friends.”
Jake’s accomplishments during his tenure have
made a strong impression even on recent graduates
like Briner, who says, “Leading by example is one of
the hardest achievable qualities that any person can
hope to accomplish in their lifetime. In my four years
on campus, I have clearly seen President Schrum’s
unquestionable commitment to every student, faculty
member and member of the staff; his leadership has
helped to keep the Southwestern community together
through turbulent times.”
Colin Berr ’13 says Jake is always open to student
ideas. “He invited me to stop by his office any time
I wanted to share an idea, so I met with him in
my junior year when I worked on the Georgetown
public transit effort with Student Congress. He said
the University would follow the student lead, as it
had with the wind power idea in 2009.” With Jake’s
support, Berr and his fellow committee members
felt confident they had the backing of the University
when it came time to meet with off-campus groups
and city officials.
He says, “President Schrum’s ability to keep track
of 1,400 students—a quarter of whom are new every
year—has a way of making you feel like you matter.
I saw him on campus one time and just said, ‘Hey,
Jake’ without thinking; that’s how comfortable he
made me feel. It’s meaningful to see how he has
impacted the lives of others. Knowing him has made
my Southwestern Experience more enjoyable.”
“No one better embodies what it
means to Be Southwestern than
Jake and Jane.” — Allison Dickson '02
12 Southwestern Magazine
2010
„	 Southwestern signs an agreement with
the city of Georgetown that will meet
the University’s electric needs from wind
power for the next 18 years
„	 The Charles and Elizabeth Prothro Center
for Lifelong Learning opens and earns
silver LEED certification
„	 Dr. William H. Foege of the Bill &
Melinda Gates Foundation speaks
as the Shilling Lecturer
„	 Film Director/Writer/Producer Mira Nair
is the Writer’s Voice speaker
„	 Author John Pipkin is named Writer
in Residence at Southwestern
„	 A report by the Sustainable Endowments
Institute in Cambridge, Mass., states
that Southwestern is one of the most
sustainable colleges in Texas
„	 Southwestern commencement
participants go green by wearing
biodegradable robes
„	 Southwestern’s Board of Trustees
approves Shaping Our Future: The
Strategic Plan for Southwestern
University 2010–2020
„	 Southwestern becomes the new home
to Georgetown’s Senior University
2011
„	 Blake Mycoskie, founder of TOMS
Shoes, speaks as the Shilling Lecturer
„	 Writer, editor and publisher Dave
Eggers is the Writer’s Voice speaker
„	 President Schrum announces the
addition of women’s lacrosse and
the reinstatement of football to the
University’s varsity athletics program
„	 Southwestern’s Athletics Department
installs lights on the soccer/lacrosse
competition field making night games
possible for the first time
„	 Southwestern receives pledges of $1
million and $3 million respectively from
The Fondren Foundation of Houston and
The Cullen Foundation of Houston
for Southwestern’s planned new
science center
President Schrum reflects on
his relationship with the
University prior to his
inauguration (top right).
The late Wangari Mathaai,
2004 Nobel Peace Prize winner
and 2009 Shilling Lecturer, was
joyful when President Schrum
signed the American College and
University President’s Climate
Commitment (lower right).
Be Southwestern
The parent of a Southwestern graduate, Walzel came
onto the Board of Trustees during former President
Roy Shilling’s term and was asked by then-chair of
the board Red McCombs ’49 to head the search for
Shilling’s replacement. He recalls, “I was very excited
to be the one to make the call to Jake to let him know
he’d been elected. Since then, my granddaughter has
become a Southwestern graduate, and Jake and Jane
have become close family friends.”
Benold reflects, “Jake’s many accomplishments at
our beloved University have consistently added to
her prestige and effectiveness for which all alumni
are thankful.” Her husband, Dr. Douglas Benold ’44,
a long-term member of Southwestern’s Board of
Trustees, says, “In his role as President of our alma
mater and through his establishment of Paideia, Jake
has worked hard to impress on students and faculty
the need for a combination of learning with a real
concern for the good of mankind.”
Another alumna, Allison Dickson ’02, had a unique
but no-less-meaningful relationship with the Schrums.
Needing full-time care and assistance due to Muscular
Dystrophy, Dickson’s parents had to live on campus
with her for four years. During that time, while she
became a Tri-Delta sorority sister of Libby, her parents
became friends of Jake and Jane. Through that family
friendship, Dickson says she “saw firsthand Jake’s lead-
ership skills and learned from him the importance
of dreaming big, thinking outside of the box, staying
true to one’s core values, and always putting the best
interests of current and future SU students first.”
Dickson believes, “No one better embodies what
it means to Be Southwestern than Jake and Jane. As
students, alumni, parents, administrators, donors and
the First Family, they have believed in and lived out
our University’s core values in every way … When they
look back on the lives they’ve changed—including
mine—I hope they are proud.”
Note: President Schrum recently announced that he will
become president of Emory & Henry College in Emory,
Virginia following his retirement from Southwestern. His
term at Emory & Henry will begin Aug. 1, 2013.
13spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu
2012
„	 New York Times columnist Thomas
Friedman speaks as the Shilling Lecturer
„	 Playwright and screenwriter Suzan-Lori
Parks is the Writer’s Voice speaker
„	 Southwestern is included in the fourth
edition of the book Colleges That
Change Lives
„	 Forbes magazine ranks Southwestern in
the top 100 colleges and universities in
the U.S. and second in Texas
„	 U.S. News & World Report features
Southwestern in its “College Road
Trip” series
„	 President Schrum announces he will
retire in July 2013, culminating 13 years
as Southwester’s 14th President
„	 Southwestern is one of 47 colleges
selected to participate in a $50 million
science education initiative sponsored
by the Howard Hughes Medical
Institute (HHMI).
„	 President Schrum receives a third
Presidential Leadership Grant from
The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
„	 For the second year in a row,
Southwestern is number one in the
SCAC in the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency’s College &
University Green Power Challenge
„	 Southwestern receives a $500,000
grant from The Andrew W. Mellon
Foundation to help make Paideia
available to all students in fall 2014
2013
„	 World-renowned conservationist and
United Nations messenger of peace
Jane Goodall is the Shilling Lecturer
„	 Southwestern officially launches the
HHMI-Southwestern Inquiry Initiative
„	 Southwestern receives a $1 million
challenge grant from the J.E. and L.E.
Mabee Foundation of Tulsa, Okla., to
help begin building phase one of the
new science center
„	 Southwestern’s Board of Trustees
announces the election of Edward B.
Burger as the University’s 15th President
The Paideia Program will always be associated with the
Schrum legacy at Southwestern. Once an innovative
co-curricular program serving roughly 250 students,
Paideia will be the core of the Southwestern educational
experience for all students, beginning in fall 2014.
The Jake B. and Jane W. Schrum Paideia Fund will support Schrum
scholarships and fellowships. Schrum Scholarships will be awarded
to students who meet Southwestern University’s requirements for
financial assistance. Schrum Fellowships will be awarded to people
who have achieved distinction in their chosen career and who agree
to spend a period of time on the University campus participating in
the Paideia experiences of students.
Every Gift Matters!
www.southwestern.edu/giving/schrum-paideia
Honor Jake and Jane Schrum’s years
of service to Southwestern University
by making a gift to the
Jake B. and Jane W. Schrum
P a i d e i a F u n d
14 Southwestern Magazine
ACADEMICS IN FOCUS
Tradition! Most colleges and universities have
their own traditions, and Southwestern is no excep-
tion. The University’s rich heritage and storied tradi-
tions are what legends are made of. One of those (not
so legendary) traditions has been the course registra-
tion process.
As recently as eight years ago, students participated
in the tradition of gathering in the Corbin J. Robertson
Center to register for classes—Black Friday style—to
get any course still available that fulfilled a general
education requirement.
Beginning in the fall of 2014, the tradition of merely
checking off gen. ed. requirements will be a thing of
the past at Southwestern.
Paideia is about to become part of every student’s
Southwestern Experience, and facilitating a variety of
interdisciplinary experiences will become an integral
and integrated part of the Southwestern curriculum.
Developed in 2003 by President Jake B. Schrum ’68
and Provost Jim Hunt, the Paideia Program sought
to bring together traditional academics with civic
engagement and intercultural learning, but to date
it has only been available to a small subsection of
our students. In an effort to include more students
and faculty and to more strongly integrate various
aspects of learning, a team of faculty, staff and students
formed a committee to develop an idea for a Quality
Enhancement Plan (QEP), which is a significant
element in Southwestern’s re-accreditation process.
The idea, developed over the course of two years,
was a re-imagining of Paideia that would include all
students and significantly more faculty members, and
would become the foundation for the Southwestern
curriculum.
According to Alison Kafer, associate professor of
feminist studies, “Contemporary social and political
problems require the ability to integrate multiple
approaches and perspectives.” However, she says these
kinds of conversations have happened primarily in
offices or hallways or residence halls. “We haven’t
had time or space in the curriculum to build on these
conversations with any kind of intentionality,” she
says. But faculty and staff across campus are working
to change that by expanding the reach of Paideia and
by building interdisciplinarity into the heart of the
academic program.
Professor of Kinesiology Jimmy Smith explains that
Paideia will allow students to take at least three courses
intentionally clustered around shared content—a
theme—and a Paideia seminar in the junior or senior
year. The initial three themes are “Mediterranean
Mingling,” “Representing Gender” and “Global
Health.” Faculty from all disciplines teaching courses
within each theme will interact with one another to
ensure that connections are being made across the
classes students are taking in each of the clusters; the
seminars will bring all of this together in a culmi-
nating experience.
The clustered courses will give students the space
and tools to reflect on the overlaps and differences
between disciplines, with guidance and support from
faculty. The interdisciplinary Paideia seminars will
provide the opportunity to individually and collec-
tively reflect on students’ cumulative experiences
within the theme. By bringing together faculty from
different departments to cover a central question or
idea—such as a philosopher and a political scientist,
both discussing representations of gender—the semi-
nars will allow students to learn alongside faculty in
the classroom; everyone will be bringing different
knowledge and experiences to the table.
Kafer says that students are excited to talk about how
what they’re learning in one class informs or extends
the work they’re doing in another class. By intention-
ally encouraging students to think about how they can
ask the same questions across different disciplines, and
exploring how their methods, assumptions or answers
shift across different sites, Paideia will give students
an opportunity to collaborate with each other and
with faculty over the course of several years.
“One of the things I most love about teaching at
Southwestern is how frequently I am surprised by my
students,” says Kafer. “They are always helping me
change the way I see the world. What Paideia does
is create more such opportunities—now I will have
more of these moments with more students as well
as with my faculty and staff colleagues.”
Alison Marr, assistant professor of mathematics,
adds, “We’re creating a community that understands,
respects and appreciates interdisciplinarity. Paideia is
no longer for select faculty and students. All students
...In 10 years, any visitor to our campus should know what
some of the current Paideia themes are just by walking
around, because the entire community will be engaged in
various conversations around a handful of topics.
BeyondBetaPaideia Connects the Dots
15spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu
and a majority of faculty will be participating, thus
creating a campus-wide dialogue on the themes.”
Students will be learning how philosophy and polit-
ical science sometimes cover similar territory, but that
each field formulates its questions differently, or how
one can read the same book in both a religion course
and a literature course and get something completely
different out of it each time. As students and faculty
bring different knowledge and experiences to the table,
Southwestern brings interdisciplinarity to the heart
of its academic program.
By doing so, Southwestern is striving to make sure
all of our students understand how to apply multiple
disciplines to a single problem. Marr says, “The student
who can walk away with an understanding of how to
do that will be more successful in the ever-changing
world and will be able to solve problems in a more
creative way. The fact is that the ability to think about
problems from multiple disciplines is a skill many
employers and graduate schools find valuable.”
Katy Ross, associate professor of Spanish and
co-coordinator for the Mediterranean Mingling
cluster, hopes that Paideia will allow students and
faculty to interact in new and dynamic ways and that,
by exploring the interdisciplinary nature of ideas,
students will be able to view problems—and solve
them—in new, unexpected ways outside their univer-
sity experience.
How will Paideia encompass all of campus, not just
faculty and students? Dana Hendrix, head of collec-
tion development and acquisitions for the A. Frank
Smith, Jr. Library Center, says for example, that she
and other librarians plan to “work to connect Paideia
students with the resources, concepts and skills they
Global Health
How do culture, age and sex shape societal and individual definitions
of health? In this cluster, students will explore the factors that lead
to health and healthcare disparities within and across nations, as
well as develop ideas on how to improve outcomes through inter-
ventions at the individual, institutional and governmental levels.
Representing Gender
How do sex and gender vary across space, place and time? Why
is the world sexed and gendered? What are the consequences of
living in a sexed and gendered world? Inside and outside the class-
room, students will analyze how gender and sexuality are repre-
sented in different disciplines and explore the points of sympathy
that exist across different fields of study while developing an under-
standing of areas of tension and conflict.
Mediterranean Mingling
How does a part of the world famous for its wine, olives and cheese,
serve as a model for understanding global issues? Studying the
Mediterranean—a sea of intersections and fluid borders—will
help students see what is at the core of global connection and
conflict. The cultural, historical and ecological complexity where
Europe, Asia and Africa meet invites multiple perspectives and
engages a broad range of interests, from art to food, faith to poli-
tics, language to literature.
Forty-six current first-year students have applied for their theme and will begin their clus-
tered courses in fall 2013. First year 2013/14 students will apply as well. Beginning in fall
2014, all Southwestern students will be involved in Paideia clusters.
Paideia2.0
16 Southwestern Magazine
One of the coordinators of the
Global Health cluster, Associate
Professor of Biology Maria
Cuevas seeks close collaboration
with students in the classroom
and in the laboratory (right).
need for research and exploration as they progress
through the program and complete their interdisci-
plinary Paideia seminar work.”
Civic engagement and intercultural learning will
continue to be important aspects of Paideia. Sarah
Brackmann, director of civic engagement, is excited
that through community-engaged learning, “we’re
going to be connecting the intellectual with the action
and activism in intentional, integrated and interdis-
ciplinary ways to create relevant opportunities—not
just volunteerism but experiential learning experi-
ences—for our students.”
Kim Murphy, assistant dean for academic success
and director of records, sees the advising experience
being transformed as a result of Paideia as well. “The
guided process of pulling together seemingly dispa-
rate ideas is healthy and exciting for both students
and advisers,” she says.
The general consensus seems to be that Paideia will
provide all campus constituents with more opportuni-
ties to think critically about how to connect what we
do in the classroom to the communities around us.
How can alumni, parents, donors and friends of
the University participate? Marr suggests, “Alumni
can participate in lecture series, panels and extra-
curricular events related to the themes. Community
members can find ways to connect to themes and
suggest possible partnerships for civic engagement
projects. Donors can think creatively about ways
contributions to Paideia could help strengthen the
program (scholarships for study abroad, contribu-
tions to the library, funds for themed-based housing,
support for additional faculty interested in interdis-
ciplinarity, and more).”
The importance of interdisciplinarity, says Smith,
is that “the great issues and problems facing the
world cannot be addressed or solved by viewing and
attacking them from a single perspective ... and there-
fore require an approach that embraces the knowledge,
methodology and perspectives of several academic
disciplines. In other words, they require an interdis-
ciplinary approach.”
Kafer explains, “Clustering courses around themes
will enable faculty to develop relationships with each
other, to enrich their understanding of interdisci-
plinary perspectives, and to experiment with team-
teaching, collaborative teaching, and creative new
pedagogies and methodologies.”
The benefits of Paideia are many. In addition to
helping new and prospective students better under-
stand the liberal arts, Kafer says that it also provides
a way for students to think about education in terms
of what interests them, to address different ideas
in different ways, and to learn how they relate. For
faculty, she says, “it will provide opportunities to talk
about teaching together, to share ideas and teaching
methods, and to collaborate. As a faculty member, it is
providing me the chance to learn from my colleagues.”
The thought among Paideia faculty is that in 10
years, they will be more conversant with what their
colleagues are doing; that students will better under-
stand how classes can and do relate; that more and
more, the library will be a place for gathering and
interacting; and that there will be a vibrant culture
of civic engagement and collaborative teaching and
learning.
Marr suggests that in 10 years, any visitor to our
campus should know what some of the current Paideia
themes are just by walking around, because the entire
community will be engaged in various conversations
around a handful of topics.
Though “interdisciplinarity” is a word that is
frequently encountered in academia these days, few
institutions have made a concerted, university-wide
effort to both define interdisciplinarity and to create
an academic experience that truly is interdisciplinary
in nature.
“Paideia will make Southwestern unique among
liberal arts colleges,” says Smith.
While studying abroad in Xi’an,
China in spring 2010, Elizabeth
Wilson ’11 rode in a camel
caravan in the Taklamakan
Desert (top).
Twenty-five students, including
junior David Boutté, spent
their Spring Break in the Gila
Wilderness in New Mexico
as part of the Destination:
Service program (above).
17spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu
18 Southwestern Magazine
1
2
3
Which of your classmates (and professor)...
„	 had a “Question Authority” 	
	 bumper sticker on their 	
	Trans-Am?
„	 is now employed by the National 	
	 Institute for Technology in 		
	 Education (NITLE)?
„	 was awarded a badge of
	 honor for preparing soldiers
	 for deployment?
„	 has authored a book translated
	 into four languages and published
	 in five countries?
„	 holds two Masters of Divinity 		
	 and Theology Degrees and a
	 Ph.D. (with honors) in philosophy
	 and theology from Princeton
	 Theological Seminary?
„	 is an expert in counter 		
	 terrorism analysis?
„	 recently moved from a
	 climate with regular 100+ 		
	 Fahrenheit temperatures to
	 one known for it’s sub-zero weather?
„	 is a University Scholar?
„	 was a Pirate on the
	 soccer field?
„	 is a member of Alpha
	 Xi Delta Fraternity?
„	 is the author of a best-selling 		
	 book on conservative politics?
„	 is a “force to be reckoned with?”
„	 is a current master’s
	 degree candidate at
	 Northwestern University, 		
	 Southwestern’s theoretical
	 “sister school”?
Be(ing)
Southwestern
five exceptional pirates
sit for a quick sketch
Photography by Lance Holt
The theme of Homecoming and Reunion Weekend
2012 was “Be Southwestern.” A number of times
during the weekend, people asked Southwestern staff
members what the phrase means. The answer often
began with, “It’s more than a Twitter hashtag.” But,
the serious answer is that it means something different
to each member of the Southwestern community.
One might “Be Southwestern” by wearing a Pirate
Athletics t-shirt; another might be active in his or her
local alumni association. You may “Be Southwestern”
by giving each year to the Southwestern Fund or by
hiring a Southwestern student as an intern in your
office. And many believe that to “Be Southwestern”
means to take what you have learned into the world
and make, as our Core Purpose states, “...contribu-
tions toward the well being of humanity.”
The 2012 alumni awards—presented during
Homecoming by The Association of Southwestern
University Alumni—recognized and honored five such
community members who exemplify the University’s
Core Values in their everyday lives. They are true to
themselves and others. They promote a passion for
intellectual growth. They respect the worth and dignity
of persons. They encourage activism in the pursuit
of justice and the common good. And, they cultivate
academic excellence.
19spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu
alumni spotlight
5
4
Read about these outstanding
representatives of Southwestern
at www.sualumni.net/awards
1.	Farhana Mahmood Qazi ’96
Distinguished Humanitarian
2.	Susannah Prucka ’03
Distinguished Young Alumna
3.	Jay Richards ’89
Distinguished Professional
4.	Georgianne Hewett ’90
Distinguished Southwestern Service
5.	Eric Selbin, Professor of Political
Science and University Scholar
Mr. Homecoming
„	 is an expert in Comparative 		
	 Politics (Comparative Revolutions;
	 Contentious Politics; Latin
	 American and Caribbean Politics;
	 Ideologies); International Politics
	 (Peace and Conflict); and
	 Political Sociology?
„	 keeps in contact with 		
	 former students long 		
	 after they graduate?
„	 name means joyful, happy and 		
	 cheerful (in the Muslim culture)?
„	 is a Tri-Delta sorority member?
„	 teaches in the Political Science
	 Department at University of 		
	 Maryland-Baltimore County?”
„	 was also employed 		
	 by Southwestern for
	 14 years?
ANSWERS:3,4,1,5,3,1,4,
5,2,2,3,2,4,5,5,1,4,2,4
“I am deeply humbled and honored by
this invitation to serve as president of such
a special liberal arts institution—an institu-
tion that is able to embrace its noble tradi-
tions while reimagining education in this
new century with innovation, creativity
and wisdom,” said Edward B. Burger on
his appointment as the 15th president of
Southwestern University.
The Francis Christopher Oakley Third
Century Professor of Mathematics from
Williams College in Williamstown, Mass.,
Burger received in 2010 the prestigious
Robert Foster Cherry Award for Great
Teaching from Baylor University, where he
subsequently spent a year teaching and a
year as vice provost for strategic educational
initiatives.
Burger graduated summa cum laude
with distinction in mathematics from
Connecticut College and has been a faculty
member at Williams since 1990. However,
he is no stranger to Central Texas, having
earned his Ph.D. from The University of
Texas at Austin. He has also been a resi-
dent of Austin for the past several months
while shooting instructional math videos
for elementary school students.
In 1997, Burger became one of the first
individuals to make instructional math
videos accessible to a broad audience
through mediums such as CD-ROMs and
the Internet. Since then, he has created more
than 3,000 such videos covering curriculum
from kindergarten through college-level
mathematics that have helped millions of
students worldwide.
Named to the Huffington Post list of
“Game Changers” in 2010—a group of
100 “innovators, mavericks, visionaries
and leaders ... who are changing the way
we look at the world and the way we live
in it”—Burger has also received a number
of national awards, including the 2001
Deborah and Franklin Tepper Haimo
National Award for Distinguished College
or University Teaching of Mathematics, and
the Chauvenet Prize from the Mathematical
Association of America. In January 2013 he
was inducted as one of the first Fellows of
the American Mathematical Society.
A noted scholar, Burger has authored or
co-authored more than 35 research articles
(with 15 undergraduate co-authors) as well
as 12 books including his most recent, The
5 Elements of Effective Thinking, co-authored
with Michael Starbird from The University
of Texas at Austin.
He has delivered more than 400 lectures
worldwide and has appeared on more than
40 radio and TV programs. His appear-
ance on an episode of NBC’s “Science of
the Winter Olympics” series earned him a
Telly Award.
Burger has been described as “an eloquent
spokesperson for the liberal arts.” In addi-
tion, Elaine Craddock, professor of reli-
gion at Southwestern and a member of
the Presidential Search Committee, says,
“Ed is the quintessential teacher-scholar
with sterling academic credentials who
publishes widely but who also focuses on
undergraduate education. He understands
Southwestern’s vibrant interdisciplinary
curriculum and how to nurture deeper
creativity and innovation.”
Burger says, “Southwestern is a leader
in offering profound, life-changing expe-
riences that allow individuals to see them-
selves and their world in a richer, more
focused way. I am excited by the energy and
creativity that seems to permeate throughout
the Southwestern community, particularly
through the evolution of Paideia.”
Burger will succeed President Jake B.
Schrum ’68 on July 1, 2013.
Burger Elected 15th President
Williams College Professor of Mathematics to take helm July 1
On Feb. 20, 2013, reknowned
mathematician and winner of
the Robert Foster Cherry Award
for Great Teaching at Baylor
University, Edward B. Burger,
was named Southwestern’s
15th president.
PhotobyLanceHolt
20 Southwestern Magazine
on campus www.southwestern.edu/newsroom
Sophomores Kelsey Abel, Nathan Balke
and Chandler Johnson were awarded the
$2,500 Walt Potter Prize for their 2012–2013
King Creativity Fund-sponsored project.
“I was very surprised to hear that we had
won, but it was very affirming of what we
chose to do,” Abel says. “On a base level, we
just made a dome, but perhaps what brought
this project to the next level was the focus
on what could be done with this design,
specifically in the humanitarian aspects of
housing the needy.”
Paul Gaffney, dean of the Sarofim School
of Fine Arts and coordinator of the King
Creativity Fund, says the Potter Prize selec-
tion committee chose the low-cost eco dome
project because it was a good example of
taking a creative new approach to an existing
idea. “While geodesic domes have been
around for a while, this team took a new
approach to figuring out how (they) can
be constructed quickly, cheaply and using
locally available materials,” he says.
Balke, a physics and German major, says,
“I wanted to do something to broaden my
experience outside the classroom. Professor
of Physics Steve Alexander (suggested) a
dome project and it seemed like a good fit.”
Alexander says he challenged Balke with
making something that would be more
efficient and less expensive than what
is currently on the market. Johnson says
the team plans to apply for another King
Creativity Fund grant next year to work on
developing a marketing plan for the dome.
The King Creativity Fund was established
in 2000 with an endowment provided by
W. Joseph “Joey” King ’93. It is designed
to support “innovative and visionary proj-
ects” proposed by Southwestern students.
The Walt Potter Prize is named for Professor
of Mathematics and Computer Science
Walt Potter, who mentored King as a
Southwestern student.
Balke enlisted Abel, a physics major, and
Johnson, an architecture major, to work
with him on the project. He says the team’s
biggest challenge was finding the best design
for the hubs that would hold the various
pieces together (see photo left).
Alexander says the students’ hub design
can be used with a variety of different mate-
rials, including metal pipe, wooden beams,
bamboo or PVC. And, the same hub design
can be used to build different types of
geodesic domes.
Throughout the project, people suggested
numerous possible uses for the dome struc-
ture—everything from greenhouses to emer-
gency shelters and storage units to sunrooms.
The trio is currently looking at alterna-
tive materials and working on getting their
creation into large-scale production.
Eco Dome Takes Top
Creativity Prize
one structure, multiple uses
$1 Million Science Challenge
	 Southwestern plans to break ground on its new science center in late 2013, thanks to a
$1 million challenge grant the University has received from the J.E. and L.E. Mabee Foundation
of Tulsa, Okla. If $1 million in matching funds is raised by the end of 2013, the University will
have the $8 million needed to begin work on the first phase of the project, which will add
23,700 square feet of space to Southwestern’s existing Fondren-Jones Science Hall.
	 The second phase will be the complete remodeling of the original 1954 section of the building,
followed by a new three-story entrance on the northwest side. When complete, the building
will have 103,000 square feet for classrooms, offices, seminar rooms and laboratories. The total
cost of the new science center is projected to be $24 million.
	 Additional gifts have been received to support phase one of the science center project, including
$3 million from The Cullen Foundation, $1 million from The Fondren Foundation, $1 million from
The Brown Foundation, Inc., and $250,000 from the Albert and Margaret Alkek Foundation.
	 To learn more or to make a gift in support of the sciences at Southwestern, visit
www.southwestern.edu/giving/sciences/.
21spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu
As a senior volleyball player, Rachel
Thibodeau ’13, received one of only 58
NCAA postgraduate scholarships given
across all NCAA divisions to 2012–13 fall
sports athletes.
Unsure she was qualified for the award,
Thibodeau says she was reassured that she
would be a strong candidate by Volleyball
Coach Hannah Long and Director of
Intercollegiate Athletics Glada Munt.
“Knowing that they both thought I was a
worthy candidate was an honor in itself,”
she says. “When I realized that I was one of
only 29 female athletes to receive the schol-
arship, I was unbelievably honored.”
To qualify for the award, student-athletes
must excel academically and athletically,
maintaining at least a 3.2 grade-point
average, among other requirements. A
psychology major and member of the
SU women’s volleyball team, Thibodeau
achieved a 4.0 GPA and received numerous
athletic awards including SCAC Player-of-
the-Year, CoSIDA Academic All-District First
Team and AVCA Third Team All-America.
For Thibodeau, the best thing about
being an athlete at Southwestern was having
the opportunity to not only compete on a
nationally recognized volleyball team, but
also to be involved in several campus orga-
nizations and to build relationships with
students and professors off the court.
“Receiving this award was essentially
the culmination of everything I hoped to
achieve as a Division III athlete: excelling
both academically and athletically,” she says.
Thibodeau says she will use the $7,500
award—given specifically for the purpose
of funding graduate school—toward her
pursuit of a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology
with an emphasis on child development and
neuroscience at the University of Alabama.
Thibodeau ’13 Garners Top
Undergraduate Award
If you’ve been on campus in the past six
months—or if you’ve driven past the east
side of campus on Highway 29—you have
seen some major projects going on.
Where you see the heavy equipment
moving around on the former golf course is
where the new football field house, athletics
fields and track will be.
According to Glada Munt, director of inter-
collegiate athletics, the project remains on
target for an Aug. 1 completion. The field
house is near completion and the turf on
the practice fields has been rolled out.
The yet-to-be-named field house will
include coaches’ offices, a weight room
for all Southwestern athletes—set up for
strength training, conditioning and power
lifting—and a locker room for the football
and men’s lacrosse teams. Munt says the new,
30-inch lockers will hold uniforms, pads,
helmets and more. “Our current 14-inch
lockers don’t even hold a typical men’s
basketball shoe,” she explains. Another
positive feature of the locker room will be
the addition of a machine called an Ozoner,
in which players put their pads, uniforms,
hats and gloves for 30 minutes and it kills
the bacteria. “That means no more locker
room odor, and we’re all happy about that!,”
says Munt.
In addition to the field house, the east
end of campus will be home to two lighted
multi-purpose athletics fields, a throwing
area for discuss and shot-put, and a running
track. “We have a five-time Olympian as
our track coach and this is the first time
we’ve had a track on campus,” Munt says.
“We’re thrilled!”
Further up the hill, where there was once
a grassy slope outside the Robertson Center
facing the baseball field, will soon be the
Coach Jim Mallon Field House (informally
called the new baseball locker room). Munt
says the building will be ready for use by
the fall semester.
Facilities Stay
on Target
PhotobyLanceHolt
22 Southwestern Magazine
pirate athletics www.southwesternpirates.com
Swimmers Ivan Cruickshank and Tommy
Frashier have combined their love of the
water with another unlikely passion—
singing. Do they sing in the locker room
shower? That’s confidential, but the two
did join voices on the pool deck to sing
the National Anthem prior to a home swim
meet in January.
Frashier, a sophomore business major
with a political science minor, says the best
advice he’s received to date was given by
swimmer Adrian Gomez, who often said at
practice, “The best get better by working on what they aren’t good at.” Frashier thinks the
worst mistake for new students is to be too worried to do anything but the minimum. “All
of the great rewards come from the extras,” he says.
In February, Frashier’s hard work and participation in the “extras” paid off with a 1st place
finish in the 500 Freestyle with a time of 4:39.97, setting a new school record. In addition
to being a member of the swim team, Frashier is also a member of the SU Chorale and
Student Congress. Off campus, he is a volunteer English as a Second Language teacher at
First United Methodist Church in Georgetown.
Cruickshank is a senior biology major and a member of the SU Chorale. He has been a
member of Southwestern’s record-breaking freestyle and medley relay teams, as well as a
leader in the individual freestyle and backstroke events.
Singing in
the (Locker
Room) Shower
Ivan Cruickshank and Tommy Frashier make a splash in
song as they sing the National Anthem before the start of
a January 2013 swim meet. Both are members of the swim
team as well as the SU Chorale. See the video at
www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=620177592357.
23spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu
Another “alumni-driven project, supported
in spirit by the University,” says Glada Munt,
is one that baseball alumni Pat Leonard ’90
and Danny Mickan ’84 conceived to install
a life-size bronze statue of the late Coach Jim
Mallon overlooking the baseball field. “Looking
out over the east side of campus was Coach
Mallon’s favorite view,” says Munt. The former
Pirates received the blessing of Mallon’s wife
and sons for the memorial and are now in
the process of funding its cost through dona-
tions from other Southwestern alumni. The
statue should be installed some time during
the 2013–14 academic year.
This fall, K-MAC Sports will provide audio and HD video play-by-play action and sports commen-
tary for all 10 (home and away) football games. Log on to kmacsports.com to learn more.
Pirate fans are also able to get in on the action of volleyball, baseball, softball, men’s and women’s
basketball, lacrosse and soccer home conference games—audio only via kmacsports.com
and video via CollegeTVTicket at collegetvticket.com.
Jim Mallon
on Deck
Former players receive
go-ahead to fund bronze
PIRATESONTHE(AIR)WAVES
The Original Social Network
The following Class Notes were submitted June 30–Dec. 31, 2012. Share your accomplishments,
achievements and life milestones with friends and classmates! Submit your Class Note by
visiting www.sualumni.net. Select “Connect” from the main menu, then “Class Notes.” You may
also email your Class Note to alumni@southwestern.edu.
1955
Ann Truog Hardy, Colleyville, has won a number
of awards in the past year including “Best Painting” in
the National Exhibition of American Women Artists and
“Best of Show” for 2012 in the Texas and the Neighbors
Regional Art Exhibition. She was recently accepted into
Western Oil Painters of America, an organization “dedi-
cated to preserving and promoting excellence in repre-
sentational art.” Ann can be found regularly painting in
her treehouse studio and studying to hone her skills.
She is also a mentor for disadvantaged students aged
10–13, teaching them to paint and about the “disciplines
of life.” Her work can be seen at www.annhardy.com.
1961
William Seale, Jasper, see The Rev. Milton
Jordan Jr. ’62.
1962
The Rev. Milton Jordan Jr., Georgetown, is the
co-author of a book published in Oct. 2012 titled “Just
Between Us: Stories and Memories from the Texas
Pines.” His friend, William Seale ’61, was a contrib-
utor to the book. The stories included in the book “are
firsthand accounts by those who know the region [East
Texas] best, and they serve as glimpses into life in the
Pine Belt that to this point have not been recorded or
widely shared.”
1967
The Honorable Sen. Joan Bray, St. Louis, Mo.,
was a 2012 recipient of the Starkloff Legacy Award by
Paraquad, a company whose mission is to “empower
people with disabilities to increase their indepen-
dence through choice and opportunity.” The award is
presented to an individual who has dedicated their life to
promoting positive change for people with disabilities.
1969
Fleming Crim, Madison, Wis., was selected by
the National Science Foundation to serve as assis-
tant director for the Directorate of Mathematical and
Physical Sciences.
1979
Shirley Tatum, Stillwater, Okla., earned her Master
of Library Science degree from Emporia State University
in Dec. 2011. She is the Research and Instruction
Librarian at Langston University.
1980
Peggy Palmer Francis, San Antonio, was the
recipient of two awards in 2012. She was presented the
Nursing Leadership Award by the Medical Center Rotary
Club of San Antonio, and the Texas Nurse Practitioner
of the Year Award by the Texas Nurse Practitioners.
Peggy is a nurse practitioner with Urology San Antonio.
1982
Robert Coats, Bloomington, is the band director for
the Bloomington Independent School District.
1983
David Menconi, Raleigh, N.C., is the author of “Ryan
Adams: Losering, A Story of Whiskeytown.” The book is
a true story about the rise of the 1990s insurgent-country
band “Whiskeytown.” Ryan Adams was a singer-song-
writer for the band and Menconi witnessed the band’s
rise to fame. Menconi has been the music critic at The
News & Observer in Raleigh since 1991. His writing has
appeared in Spin, Billboard and The New York Times.
24 Southwestern Magazine
Alumni
Council 2012–2014
Blake Stanford ’81
President
Daryl Allen ’93
President-Elect
Hector Ruíz ’10
Class Relations Chair
Ed Ellis ’64
Nominations and Awards Chair
Susan Peace Holley ’73
Homecoming and Reunions Chair
Tim Treviño ’93
Local Associations Chair
Harland DeWitt ’92
Alumni Connection Groups Chair
Yesenia García ’03
Assembly Program Chair
Marisela Treviño Orta ’99
Assembly Program Chair-Elect
Ebony Rose ’02
Alumni Communications Chair
Cynthia Olson Bourland ’89
Lifelong Learning Chair
Matt ’80 and
Donna Carter Worley ’80
At-large Members
Chris Cragg ’83
At-large Member
Pam Slaughter Bush ’76
Trustee Representative
Sarah Puffer, Class of 2014
Student Representative
Karen Hanson-Flowers ’75
Ex-officio, Annual Giving
Board Chair
class notes
Class Notes on
SUAlumni.net
	Timely
	Searchable by city or category
	Exclusive to the SUAlumni.net community
	Connected to individual member profiles
Submit your class note through
www.sualumni.net
1.	 “Connect” from the menu bar
and click on “Class Notes.”
2.	Login. Click “Add Class Note.”
3.	First-time user? Email
alumni@southwestern.edu
for your Constituent ID.
REUNION YEAR
1984
Terry Whitley, Moody, was appointed a member
of the Board of Trustees of the Graduate School of
Banking at Louisiana State University in Oct. 2012. The
school is a non-profit professional education program
for bank officers and is sponsored by the Texas Bankers
Association along with 14 other bankers’ associations
in southern states.
1985
John Baldwin, McKinney, received his Master of
Divinity degree and graduated magna cum laude from
Perkins School of Theology. He is the Senior Minister
at First United Methodist Church of Celina.
1986
Mark Graves, Plano, and his wife, Michelle, are
adventuring around the South Pacific on their 38-foot
sailboat. He remarks, “…we’re sailing west through
French Polynesia to the Kingdom of Tonga, and then
south to New Zealand. We’ll see where the winds take
us from there…” Read about their travels in their blog
http://svcheers.wordpress.com/.
1988
Tom Stell, Houston, was listed as one of Houston
Press’ “100 Creatives” due to his work in the arts
community as the executive director of Obsidian Art
Space, which gives him an opportunity to write, direct
and act. He is also a painter.
1989
Jerry Young, Houston, was included on the 2012
Texas and Louisiana Super Lawyers list. He was also
selected as a Top 100 Texas Super Lawyer and a Top
100 Houston Super Lawyer. Super Lawyers is a rating
service of outstanding lawyers who have attained a high
degree of peer recognition and evaluations, professional
achievement and independent research.
1991
William “Bill” Alexander, Houston, see Laura
Brown Nelson ‘07.
Danny Cohen, Westport, Conn., has changed careers
from being a commodities trader to being a real estate
broker. He joined the company Citi Habitats in May 2012.
BIRTH: John and Jessica Dupont Dapper, Austin,
a son, Ryan Douglas, Nov. 10, 2012.
Join Us in the
Crow’s Nest!
Be Southwestern—Become
an Admission Volunteer!
Alumni have the opportunity
to volunteer their time and
talents in the recruitment of students for Southwestern
University through the Admission Recruiting Efforts by
Alumni (A.R.E.A.) program. Visit www.sualumni.net/
AREAvolunteers to volunteer, or join our Facebook group:
www.facebook.com/Southwestern.AREA
The Association is celebrating its 10th anniversary! In
honor of this occasion, we would like your feedback. Visit
www.sualumni.net/AlumniSurvey before June 10, 2013. In
the meantime, join us in celebrating some of what we have
achieved in 10 years:
„	 Dedication of the Jake B. ’68 and
Jane Woodman Schrum ’70 Alumni Center.
„	 14 local associations across the country.
„	 19 alumni connection groups.
„	 12 class reunions held annually.
„	 Homecoming and Reunion Weekend
record attendance for 7 out of 10 years.
„	 Increasing number of alumni volunteers
each year (598 individuals in 2012).
25spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu
www.sUalumni.net alumni association
1992
Brian Hollis, San Francisco, Calif., has been working
for inRESONANCE, a database solutions company, for
the past six years. He implements FileMaker®-based
solutions and trains users in independent school districts
globally, allowing him to travel and explore the world.
Joe Wilson, Highlands Ranch, Colo., see Darien
Kubik Wilson ’93.
1993
Kate Eliassen Marley, Lincoln, Nebr., is an asso-
ciate professor of biology and science division chair at
Doene College in Crete, Nebr. She was named one of
the 40 fellows in the PULSE program through the collab-
orative effort of the National Science Foundation, the
Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the National
Institutes of Health. The effort supports a yearlong
program in which Vision and Change Leadership Fellows
consider and recommend models for improving under-
graduate life sciences education.
Darien Kubik Wilson, Highlands Ranch, Colo., is
the vice president of Volare Systems, a software devel-
opment company in Denver, Colo. Her husband, Joe
Wilson ’92, is president of Volare Systems. In Oct.
2012, the company sponsored Colorado GiveCamp in
Colorado Springs, a “weekend-long event where tech-
nology professionals from designers, developers and
database administrators to marketers and web strat-
egists donate their time to provide solutions for non-
profit organizations.”
1996
Keith McLemore, Buda, is the director of stra-
tegic initiatives for the Texas Nursery & Landscape
Association. He fondly remembers his days playing
baseball at Southwestern and remarks, “…there is
not a weed in [my] yard. It probably looks like a base-
ball diamond.”
BIRTH: Michael Rausch and Catherine Pi-Sunyer,
Bainbridge Island, Wash., a son, Adam Francis Rausch,
Jan. 29, 2012.
1997
Eric Batch, Carson, Calif., was presented the Award
of Excellence by the American Heart Association (AHA).
The award is the highest honor given to a staff member
and is presented to recognize distinguished service in
advancing the objectives of the AHA.
Genevieve Durham DeCesaro, Lubbock, is an
associate professor of dance and associate chair of
the Department of Theatre and Dance at Texas Tech
University. She has been named a 2012–2013 Integrated
Scholar by the Office of the Provost at Texas Tech. She
is one of 12 university faculty to be recognized with
this distinction.
1998
BIRTHS: Kim and Chris Brown, Dallas, a son,
Vance Andre, Dec. 31, 2012; Brad Nowak and Teena
McClelland, Chicago, Ill., a daughter, Evan Laurel
Nowak, July 15, 2012.
1999
Taryn Deaton, Alexandria, Va., earned a Master
of Theological Studies degree in May 2012 from
Palmer Theological Seminary of Eastern University in
Philadelphia, Pa.
2000
Eryn Kaiser Barker, Portland, Ore., earned a Master
of Education degree from the University of Portand.
With an emphasis on English for Speakers of Other
Languages, Eryn’s thesis examined the link between
arts-integrated education and increased language profi-
ciency in an immersion classroom.
Brandon Reynolds, San Francisco, Calif., is the
managing editor of SF Weekly, which publishes local
public interest stories (including news, food, music and
art scenes) and humor columns.
Heather Reynolds, Seabrook, is the senior internal
auditor at Furmanite Inc. in Houston.
BIRTHS: Brian and Eryn Kaiser Barker, Portland,
Ore., a son, Christopher, Sept. 2, 2012; Michael and
Elizabeth Dinn Marsh ’01, San Antonio, triplet
daughters, Nadine Elise, Denver Paige and Iyla Dinn,
Nov. 20, 2012.
2001
Tricia Mein Bruce, Maryville, Tenn., earned her
Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California,
Santa Barbara in 2006. She is an assistant professor
of sociology at Maryville College where her research
and teaching includes the sociology of religion, social
movements, Catholicism, immigration, organizations and
applied sociology. She is the author of a book published
in 2011 titled “Faithful Revolution: How Voice of the
Faithful Is Changing the Church.”
Brian Burckhardt, Boerne, opened a pottery gallery
in Comfort in July 2012. Hill Country Pottery features
Brian’s work as well as that of other local artisans,
including painters and metal artists. The opening of
the gallery included Americana musician and class-
mate Eric Hanke.
Oh Snap! The 4th annual OH SNAP!
Festival will take place Saturday, July 13, at the historic
Scoot Inn in Austin. This benefit concert includes
local bands, artists and food vendors; proceeds go to
the Sergio Machado ’05 Memorial Scholarship.
Members of the Southwestern community and all music
lovers can remember Sergio and contribute to his legacy
by attending the festival or by donating to the scholar-
ship fund. For more information and ticket sales, visit
www.ohsnapbenefit.com or www.southwestern.edu/
giving/machado.
Lockett Leadership Society*
Hector RuÍz ’10, Brownsville, is earning a Master of Accountancy degree
at The University of Texas-Pan American and is a research assistant with the
school’s Office of Rural Enterprise Development. Hector serves Southwestern
as the Class Relations Chair on the Alumni Council for The Association of
Southwestern University Alumni, a role he was appointed to in September
2012 to help strengthen alumni and student engagement. Similarly, his class-
mates elected him the Class of 2010 Delegate on the Alumni Assembly for The
Association in spring 2010. He keeps his classmates informed about each other,
the University and The Association through the “Southwestern University –
Class of 2010” group on Facebook. Hector’s interest in strengthening student relationships with alumni is exhibited
through his work with Latinos Unidos and the Hispanic Alumni Connection Group, another affiliate of The Association.
Most recently, he has collaborated with the Office of Admission to coordinate a recruitment event in the Valley as a
volunteer with the Admission Recruiting Efforts by Alumni (A.R.E.A.) group. Hector remarks, “Being a member of the
Southwestern family has opened my eyes, mind and heart. As an alumnus, my ongoing Southwestern Experience
plays a role in my everyday life as I continue to learn and love within our close-knit community. We keep inspiring
each other to value our diverse ways of thinking, respect all people and appreciate life.”
*The Lockett Leadership Society recognizes alumni who serve Southwestern University and share the spirit of
volunteerism demonstrated by McKenzie College alumnus and former Southwestern Trustee, Melville B. Lockett.
The Locket Leadership Society was established Jan. 29, 2011.
’07’10
26 Southwestern Magazine
’05
BIRTHS: Michael ‘00 and Elizabeth Dinn Marsh,
San Antonio, triplet daughters, Nadine Elise, Denver
Paige and Iyla Dinn, Nov. 20, 2012; Jenny Cuevas
Tschirhart, Pflugerville, a daughter, Emmalyn Grace,
Sept. 26, 2011.
2002
Melissa Iyer, Phoenix, Ariz., was named shareholder
in July 2012 at Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A., the law firm
where she has worked since 2006 representing govern-
mental institutions and their elected officers. The firm
remarks, “Melissa is a tremendous attorney and has
had a prodigal career to date, including a key role in a
landmark case before the Supreme Court of the United
States [Horne vs. Flores]. Her abilities and intuitive
insight about the law make her a tremendous asset to
her clients and to the Firm.” Melissa was also selected
as a Rising Star in the 2012 edition of Southwest Super
Lawyers.
Ebony Rose, Fort Worth, is the assistant director of
the Texas Christian University Leadership Center. She
oversees campus-wide educational programming and
engagement opportunities for students to help develop
their leadership potential in and out of the classroom.
2003
Tony Bonds, San Diego, Calif., is the author of “The
Moonflower King” and the prose editor for the anthology
“A Year in Ink, Volume 6.”
BIRTHS: Anne Boswell and Gena McKinley,
Austin, a son, Oliver Jude Boswell-McKinley, Sept. 23,
2012; Chris and Bethany Smith Scully, Falls
Church, Va., a daughter, Lila Francis, Sept. 9, 2012.
2004
Scott Rocher, Atlanta, Ga., is a co-founder and chief
technology officer of Tonx, a subscription coffee service
based out of Los Angeles, Calif.
MARRIAGE: Aaron Johnson to Kristin Grance
‘07 on June 23, 2012, living in Austin.
BIRTHS: Teague and Kim Hull Bodley, Columbus,
Miss., a daughter, Arden Elizabeth, Sept. 4, 2012;
Sean ’05 and Ashley Still O’Neil, Jonestown, a
son, Gavin James, Sept. 5, 2012.
2005
Blithe Casterline Rocher, Atlanta, Ga., is working
as a postdoctoral fellow at Emory University.
Lynn Tarkington, Houston, earned a Ph.D. in organic
chemistry from the University of Houston in Aug. 2012.
BIRTHS: Beth Freed, Plano, a son, Eli Roger, May 30,
2012; Sean and Ashley Still O’Neil ’04, Jonestown,
a son, Gavin James, Sept. 5, 2012; Christof Straub
and Marcela Berdión-Straub, Houston, a son,
Felix Pedro, July 12, 2012.
2006
Aubrey “Aubbie” Alexander, Salt Lake City, Utah,
is a full time teaching assistant at the Violin Making
School of America (VMSA). She graduated from VMSA
with honors in 2011.
Jim Silliman, Houston, has been selected by the
State Bar of Texas, Law Student Division (LSD), to
receive the 2012-2013 Legal Professionalism Award,
which promotes professionalism among LSD members
by “rewarding participation in activities that further
the administration of justice, enhance responsibility
and provide service to the public.” Jim is finishing his
third year of law school at the University of Houston
Law Center.
Morgan Stewart, Mansfield, earned her Master
of Science Education degree with an emphasis in
environmental education from Texas Christian
University in 2012.
MARRIAGE: Kelsie Alstead to Michael Kiser on
May 5, 2012, living in Houston.
BIRTH: Michael and Kelsie Alstead Kiser, Houston,
a daughter, Rylie Hope, Jan. 26, 2012.
2007
Michael Maine, Seattle, Wash., is one of nine
selected artists to be featured throughout 2013 through
the Community Supported Arts (CSA) program. The
CSA’s mission is to “empower creativity by connecting
art lovers with local artists, building a vibrantly creative
community of thinkers, dreamers, artists and appreci-
ators.” Michael uses photography, video and audio to
empower people to find, develop and share their stories.
MARRIAGES: Kristin Grance to Aaron Johnson
’04 on June 23, 2012, living in Austin; Kendall Pace to
William Monroe Jr. on Jan. 28, 2012, living in Houston.
2008
Dominique Bertrand, Buffalo, N.Y., earned her
Master in Anthropology degree with an emphasis in
27spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu
Proud Pirates! Laura Brown Nelson ’07, Houston, is an assistant director of devel-
opment at MD Anderson Cancer Center. In a twist of fate, Laura joined a group of Southwestern Pirates in the
same office. William “Bill” Alexander ’91 has been at the Cancer Center for five years and is a senior asso-
ciate director of development. Laura’s classmates Kendall Pace Monroe and Kate Bizzell are also assis-
tant directors of development. This group of “four proud SU [alumni are] working to fight cancer” by raising money
for research programs specifically for the Cancer Center. Laura says, “We all knew that, much like our experience
at Southwestern, we wanted to work and learn somewhere that would challenge us, but also fuel our desire to
give back to our community. All having our own personal stories and connections to the world of cancer, we each
found ourselves at the number one cancer center and could not be more thrilled. We all agree that because of the
individual attention, specialized classes and incredible culture we had access to at Southwestern, we are better
professionals and community members.”
’07
primatology from the University at Buffalo—The State
University of New York.
Andy Lee, El Paso, has been working at the El Paso
ESPN radio affiliate KROD since 2008. In July 2012,
ESPN El Paso launched “Sports Spin,” a two-hour local
sports talk show hosted by Andy.
2009
Marie Franki, San Antonio, see Kelly Holt ‘11.
Jaclyn “Jaci” Kramer, Austin, graduated from
Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing with a
Bachelor of Science degree in nursing in July 2012.
She is a registered nurse working in a critical care unit
at St. David’s Medical Center.
Rachel Rigdon, Chicago, Ill., earned a master’s
degree in rhetoric and public culture in Aug. 2012
from the School of Communication Studies at
Northwestern University. She is working toward a
Ph.D. at Northwestern.
MARRIAGE: Rachel Rigdon to Michael Morgan
on March 16, 2010, living in Chicago, Ill.
2010
Teryl Henderson, Austin, is the annual giving
development specialist and phone program manager
at The University of Texas at Austin. She manages more
than 100 student callers, provides strategic insight to
Colleges and Schools at UT, plans and creates yearly
fundraising goals, and helps execute all annual giving
campaign initiatives. Teryl continues to Be Southwestern
by serving as the Class Agent for the Class of 2010.
Allison Noblitt, Austin, see Kelly Holt ‘11.
Jennifer Tindle, Houston, graduated with a Master
of Accounting degree from Vanderbilt University in May
2012. Since completing her CPA exam in the summer
of 2012, she has worked as an assurance associate at
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP.
2011
Tiffany Brigham, Denton, is pursuing a master’s
degree in higher education from the University of North
Texas. Recently, she was the Graduate of the Last
Decade (G.O.L.D.) guest speaker at the Southwestern
Snapshot – Dallas event co-hosted by The Dallas
Association of Southwestern University Alumni and
Southwestern’s Office of Admission.
Mayra Gonzalez, Georgetown, is a financial accoun-
tant at My Plates, a Texas-based company contracted
by the Texas Department of Motor Vehicles to design,
market and sell specialty license plates in the state
of Texas.
In 2013, GOLD alumni can double their gift-to-SU dollars
through the GOLD Matching Gift Challenge. And, who
doesn’t like a two-for-one deal?
Support scholarships, student organizations, the Schrum
Fund for Paideia, an academic department or an athletics
team—your gift will be matched dollar-for-dollar. And, if
you support the new Science Center, your 2013 gift will be
quadrupled through the Mabee Foundation challenge grant.
Because Graduates of the Last Decade make up more
than a quarter of all Southwestern alumni, GOLD gifts
are especially valuable! Don’t miss out on the GOLD Rush.
Please make a gift today at www.southwestern.edu/giving.
Graduates of the Last Decade,
You Are as Good as GOLD!
Every Gift Matters!
28 Southwestern Magazine
Jean Meyer Riley ’37, Georgetown,
Feb. 15, 2013
Rose Spacek Byrd ’38, Austin, June 7, 2012
Geraldine Davis Fox ’39, Granger, May 21, 2012
Edward R. Stanford Jr. ’40, Gaithersburg, Md.,
Aug. 9, 2012
Rae Hoyt Calvert ’42, Houston, Oct. 15, 2012
Posey Baggett Smith ’43, Andover, Kan.,
Nov. 17, 2012
Charles P. Godbey ’44, Dallas, June 18, 2012
Dorothea Bishop Noonan Cubberly ’45,
Rosenberg, Oct. 8, 2012
Evelyn Pranglin Galloway ‘46, Pearsall,
Jan. 5, 2013
Elizabeth Knox Hardy ’46, Lawton, Ok.,
May 24, 2012
Naida Richards Gibson ’47, Paducah,
March 13, 2013
Clarence C. Schultz Jr. ’47, New Braunfels,
Sept. 30, 2012
Bettye Jo Bjella ’47, Corpus Christi,
Dec. 24, 2012
Max Curtis Jones ’47, Clute, Jan. 17, 2013
Mary Blunt Sherman ’48, Freeport,
Jan. 17, 2013
James R. Underwood Jr. ’48, Austin,
May 16, 2012
Earl C. Hancock ’49, Waco, June 4, 2012
Bettye Crow Lindenberg ’49, Seguin,
Nov. 9, 2012
Louis Pitcock Jr. ’49, Dallas, March 22, 2013
Ralph H. Poteet ’49, Mesquite, Sept. 23, 2012
Tassie Barton Edwards ’50, Lufkin,
Dec. 8, 2012
Dr. John W. Foster Sr. ’50, Midland,
Oct. 19, 2012
Sherman R. Huie Jr. ’50, Dallas, Sept. 24, 2012
Henry F. Sheppard ’50, Cuero, Dec. 24, 2012
Marlee Baker ’51, Austin, May 19, 2012
Matt M. Dees Jr. ’51, San Antonio, Aug. 2, 2012
Mignonne Cloud Gaskey ’51, Houston,
June 7, 2012
Fannie Janette Bowmer Holleman ’51,
Burnet, May 3, 2012
Mary Marney Baltzelle ’52, Pompano Beach, Fla.,
Dec. 12, 2012
Elaine Broadwell Adair ‘52, Marshall,
Dec. 21, 2012
Gloria Chamberlain Dorris ’52, Victoria,
Nov. 22, 2012
Barbara Wolfskill Bahrt ’54, Richmond,
Jan. 13, 2013
Larry M. Freeman ’54, Salado, Jan. 15, 2013
Mary Janice Powell Gore ’54, Austin,
Dec. 25, 2012
Martha Pecora Cameron ’57, Austin,
Dec. 10, 2012
Richard H. Jackson ’57, Claremont, Calif.,
Aug. 10, 2011
Lou Birdwell Parris ’57, Houston, Oct. 31, 2012
Genevieve Linnens Richardson ’57,
Huntsville, Oct. 29, 2012
Patricia M. Quested ’57, Dallas, June 29, 2012
Warner T. Dahlberg ’58, Austin, Sept. 25, 2012
Jane Hiller Lamm ’60, Houston, Dec. 24, 2012
Windle J. Taylor ’60, Jarrell, July 19, 2012
Ralph D. Love Jr. ’61, Andice, July 24, 2012
Julie Johnson Poteet ’61, Lake Jackson,
Oct. 3, 2012
Herman Bulman ’62, Houston, Nov. 11, 2012
Nancy Hart Dickinson ’62, Clarksdale, Miss.,
Aug. 11, 2012
Wilson E. Whitmire III ’65, Birmingham, Ala.,
Jan. 26, 2013
William Lee Carter III ’66, Dallas, Dec. 16, 2012
Ronald H. Bearden ’67, Round Rock,
Nov. 29, 2012
Richard O. Luderus ’70, San Antonio,
Sept. 5, 2012
Hugh M. Parrish ’72, Austin, Sept. 18, 2012
Pamela D. Whitfield ’72, East Tawakoni,
June 6, 2012
Marcia Jean Mason McKemie ’75, Dale,
Aug. 21, 2012
Carol Storter Masi ’76, Austin, Dec. 14, 2012
Doris Vinson Moran ’86, Rockport,
May 31, 2012
Beth C. Pittman ’92, Cary, N.C., July 11, 2012
Christopher C. Kennel ‘94, San Antonio,
Feb. 4, 2013
Jennifer Murphy Martz ‘94, N. Richland Hills,
Feb. 28, 2013
Gabe W. Lawson ’98, Midland, Dec. 2, 2012
Wade Tyler “Ty” Wilson ’02, Dallas,
Sept. 13, 2012
Bethany Leidlein Deaton ’09, Kansas City, Mo.,
Oct. 30, 2012
Camille Blackmore Garey, Georgetown, Nov. 9, 2012
Notices received after March 27, 2013, will be listed
in the next issue.
Kelly Holt, Houston, has created The Austin Phoenix,
a quarterly magazine dedicated to the promotion of
individual people and local entrepreneurs who are
professionally pursuing their passions in life. Other
contributors to the Austin-based publication include
Marie Franki, Jack Frazee, Sarah Woolley ’09,
Allison Noblitt ’10 and John Grimshaw ‘12.
Tyler King, The Woodlands, see
Jessica Hughes ‘12.
Sierra Perez, Austin, is pursuing a master’s degree
in science with an emphasis in social work from The
University of Texas at Austin.
2012
John Grimshaw, Round Rock, see Kelly Holt ‘11.
Jessica Hughes, Austin, has been in a number
of theatrical performances including the Hyde Park
Theatre production of “Middletown” in Sept. 2012, the
Austin Shakespeare Company’s production of “Pride and
Prejudice” in Nov. 2012 and a variety of children’s plays
with the Pollyanna Theatre Company. Her most recent
project was co-directing a play with Tyler King ’11
titled “Austin Is a Place” through Theatre En Bloc. The
play discussed all things Austin ranging from the effects
of expansion to breakfast tacos.
Meagan Moore, Austin, is an AmeriCorps member
working in the Keep Austin Housed program as a
Housing Specialist Aid. Placed at the Goodwill Career
Academy, she works to create housing stability for
Travis County residents in financial crisis.
None of us is replaceable and we are diminished by any who are
absent from us. For the lives of all members of the Southwestern
University community who have died, we give thanks.
In Memoriam
PhotobyLanceHolt
29spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu
The day I became a Southwestern student was
full of excitement, unknowns and a bit of nervousness.
My fellow first years and I filed into the Matriculation
Convocation ceremony, gathering together for the first
time as the Class of 2013. President Schrum, in his
black and gold robe, encouraged and challenged us
to “Be Southwestern.” In response to his challenge,
we recited in unison, “We commit ourselves to the
University as a place and time of personal growth and
joint endeavor; to learn and to teach; to discover what
is strange and make it our friend…to gain knowledge
and passion for lifelong learning as a means of loving
the world and its people…”
…and during the last four years, that is exactly what
happened.
The Southwestern Experience is one of relationships
and discovery. During my time here, this proud 7th
generation Texan fell in love with the world and
learned that ‘home’ is relative and ‘family’ is ever
growing.
Southwestern is “a place and time of personal growth
and joint endeavor.” The first moment I walked onto
campus as a prospective student, I knew Southwestern
was home. It was so real, so genuine. I hit the ground
running with a desire to live college life to its fullest,
quickly discovering the benefits of Paideia—a unique
cross pollination of academic disciplines that allows
students to share questions, passions and service in
a joint endeavor of self-discovery. And, the value of
collaboration with peers and professors became signif-
icant as we each charted our individual path.
Through study abroad semesters in Freiburg,
Germany and Istanbul, Turkey, the opportunity “to
discover what is strange and make it my friend” trans-
formed my sense of home and community and led
me to know that the best souvenir is a friendship.
It’s amazing how stepping off an airplane without
knowing anyone, deciphering a foreign language,
and navigating a new routine can change one’s life.
Through constant determination, occasional confu-
sion and a lot of smiling, strangers from the corners
of the world have become lifelong friends.
Ultimately, the lessons I learned, the people
I met and the discoveries I made as a student at
Southwestern have collectively inspired my “passion
for lifelong learning” in the classroom and in the
world. I have learned to ask ‘what else?’ and I am
ever eager for ‘what’s next.’ I look forward to even
more Southwestern-inspired experiences as a grad-
uate student in London.
After four years of personal growth, learning,
teaching and opening my mind to knowledge and
passion, I gathered together with my class for the
last time at our Commencement ceremony. President
Schrum was in the same black and gold robe, but this
time we encouraged each other as we all commenced
together to the next step in this journey of lifelong
learning, friendships and discovery.
The Pledge
Katherine Tanner ’13
Masters Candidate,
Royal Holloway University of London
the last word
‘Home’ is relative and
‘family’ is ever growing.
30 Southwestern Magazine
Estate planning can be a complex endeavor, but one that can bring great rewards as well. For useful tools and
resources, please visit www.southwesterngift.org. If you would like to discuss your options in providing for
the future of Southwestern, contact Justin Gould ’98 at 800-960-6363 or justin.gould@southwestern.edu.
Every Gift Matters
Growing up, we were aware of our parents’ financial
commitment to Southwestern University. They
established two endowed scholarships: one in the
name of their parents, The Bishop-Durst Memorial
Fund, and one through a bequest to honor former
Southwestern Economics Professor M. L. Williams.
I give regularly to Southwestern, have included a
bequest in my trust, and urge others to remember
the value they received while at Southwestern and
to do likewise.
— Janet durst sweet nichols ’66
“
Nelson Durst ’36 and Annie Bishop Durst ’36
My dad, Nelson Durst,
always spoke of Southwestern
University as ‘hallowed ground’.”
Class of 2013 Raises the Bar
Graduates Kadidiatou Magassa, Austin Painchaud and David Briner
present the largest-ever Senior Class Gift in the amount of $111,331.32,
representing record class participation of 76 percent.
PhotobyLanceHolt

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Beyond the Building: A Very Personal Legacy

  • 1. THANKS MANY Jake B. Schrum ’68 and Jane Woodman Schrum ’70 spring 2013
  • 2. Science has changed. Our facilities have not. Constructed in 1954, parts of Fondren-Jones Science Hall have yet to see renovation. While Southwestern has renowned science faculty, state-of-the-art equipment and eager students, the building itself is in dire need of an update. A $1 million challenge grant Southwestern received from the J.E. and L.E. Mabee Foundation of Tulsa, Okla., allows gifts of any amount made this year toward Phase I of the science center renovation to be matched dollar-for-dollar. Make a gift today to help break ground later this year on Phase I of the new science center and help provide an enhanced science program for the students of tomorrow. $1MILLIONSCIENCECHALLENGETogether, we can help Southwestern progress...twice as fast Every Gift Matters! Visit www.southwestern.edu/phase1gift to make a gift today! 1962 1982 2012
  • 3. spring 2013 Features 6 | a (very) personal legacy Southwestern’s 14th President Jake B. Schrum ’68 is known for his love of students and his passion for the liberal arts. 14 | beyond beta Paideia connects the dots between the classroom, the community and the world for a unique interdisciplinary, intentional and integrated academic experience. 18 | Be(ing) Southwestern The Association of Southwestern University Alumni presents five alumni and faculty with 2012 distinguished awards. In every issue 4 President’s Message 20 On Campus 22 Athletics 24 Class Notes 30 Last Word 3spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu On the Cover Southwestern University’s 14th President Jake B. Schrum ’68, with Jane Woodman Schrum ’70 Photography by Lance Holt Clusterfest Bands Announced Students and staff run to catch ping pong balls for prizes at the annual announcement of the Clusterfest lineup. www.clusterfest.com University Relations Office of Communications Associate Vice President, Communications Cindy Locke Director, Creative Eric Bumgardner Assistant Director, Writer/Editor Kristina W. Moore Assistant Director, Senior Designer Antonio Banda Director, News and Media Relations Ellen Davis Director, Web Development and Communications John Kotarski ’93 Associate Director, New Media Danielle Brown Stapleton ’05 magazine@southwestern.edu University Relations Office of alumni and parents Associate Vice President, Alumni and Parents Megan Radison Frisque Senior Associate Director, Alumni and Parents JoAnn Lucero Associate Director, Alumni and Parents Grace Josey Pyka ’05 alumni@southwestern.edu parents@southwestern.edu Chief administrative officers Jake B. Schrum ’68, President Richard L. Anderson, Vice President for Fiscal Affairs Gerald Brody, Vice President for Student Life James W. Hunt, Provost and Dean of the Faculty Beverly Jones, University Chaplain W. Joseph King ’93, Vice President for Innovation C. Richard McKelvey, Vice President for University Relations Pamela McQuesten, Vice President for Information Services and Chief Information Officer Francie Schroeder, Executive Assistant to the President Ronald L. Swain, Senior Adviser to the President for Strategic Planning and Assessment Dave Voskuil, Vice President for Enrollment Services CONTACTS Main: (512) 863-6511 Alumni and Parents: (800) 960-6363 Office of Admission: (800) 252-3166 Southwestern is published semiannually by the Office of University Relations, and printed on Euroart Dull Text by TWG Plus. Bulk rate postage paid at Austin, Texas. “Paideia will make Southwestern unique among liberal arts colleges.” —Jimmy Smith Professor of Kinesiology quoted...
  • 4. T hirteen years seem to have gone by in the blink of an eye. And yet, so much has happened at Southwestern during my time as President. In a decade brack- eted by the tragedy of 9/11 and the stock market crash of 2008, our campus community has, together, been able to accomplish much that is good. With the “Thinking Ahead” Campaign at just over $144 million, we have received more gifts and pledges than at any other time in our history. As our student enrollment has grown to 1,400 and our alumni annual giving has increased, we’ve built and renovated build- ings, endowed the future of Paideia—one of the most distinctive programs in higher education—maintained an “A” rating with Moody’s and balanced the budget each year. We’ve also made real commitments to diver- sity and sustainability, revised the curriculum, and moved the endowment back onto an upward path. Satisfaction surveys by Southwestern students are stronger than ever and our ranking is once again moving upward on national lists. We have done all of this by working together for the betterment of Southwestern. While we see even greater possibili- ties for the future, particularly in the areas of collab- oration and innovation, there are still challenges to be met. The financial model for higher education is broken and structural deficits must be tackled. Although there’s always more to do and more to accomplish, I can rest assured that for the past 13 years, I have poured myself into this work; I have not held back; I have given it my all. Southwestern deserves nothing less. Thank you for giving Jane and me the opportu- nity to serve this transformational institution and for giving Southwestern your hard work and devotion. May the University not only flourish, but also be, as Jimmy Carter stated on April 4, 2001—my inaugura- tion day—a place “that creates an environment which nourishes the soul.” Truly, our loyal voices have blended to sing of Southwestern’s fame. May our calling to educate the mind and the heart continue for countless years. Jake B. Schrum ’68 President Loyal Voices Blend To Sing 4 Southwestern Magazine president’s message
  • 5. 5spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu Come Be Southwestern at Homecoming and Reunion Weekend 2013! For alumni, it’s the place to rediscover connections to friends, faculty and staff. For parents, it’s an opportunity to interact with the greater Southwestern community. We hope everyone returns November 1–3 and shares their experiences with others! Your lifelong Southwestern Experience continues. Alumni Homecoming Chair: Susan Peace Holley ’73 Student Homecoming Chair: Lucero Piña, Class of 2015 www.sualumni.net/Homecoming2013 Wondering what to expect? o Academic receptions o Alumni Awards presentation o Class reunions o Family Day o Football game o Friday Night Live o Homecoming Hospitality House o Jameson 5K o Lifelong Learning elements o Memorial Worship Service o Parade and pep rally o Picnic o Pirate Golf Classic o Soccer tournament o Student organization fair and reception o Student work showcase o Tailgating o Volleyball tournament
  • 7. ver time, that realization became one of her fondest memories. She shares, “I like to keep my desk clear. Jake is what I would call a ‘stacker’; he keeps organized by making stacks of papers. I once asked if he wanted me to clear his desk when I returned from my vacation if he didn’t have time to do it before leaving on his own vacation. He reassured me that his desk would be clean. Lo and behold, when I returned, his desk was clear; not a piece of paper anywhere. Then, I looked down and all around me on the floor were his stacks. I just stood there and laughed.” Schroeder’s story exemplifies the personal relation- ships that Schrum is known for developing with nearly everyone he meets. Caring, genuine, personal, willing and eager, involved, creative, committed, people person, welcoming, thoughtful, passionate about the liberal arts, friend — these are only a few of the ways friends, family, colleagues and community members describe both Schrum and his wife, Jane Woodman Schrum ’70. Known for his unplanned conversations with students as they walk to class or eat lunch in Mabee Commons, Jake—as he prefers to be called rather than President Schrum—has an unparalleled love for Southwestern, its students and the things that are important to them. His brother, Everett (Ev) Schrum ’70, says, “Jake is the most caring person I know; he cares not only about his family but about the community, the environment, the world...and especially about the Southwestern students. One of the first students with whom Jake connected as President was Emily Stewart ’04, a first-year room- mate of his daughter Katie Schrum ’04. Prior to arriving on campus, Stewart got a call from Katie saying, “I should tell you that my dad is the new pres- ident of Southwestern.” Even so, she didn’t expect that her first meeting with Jake would be when she walked into her room in Kurth Hall and found him vacuuming. “I didn’t even realize it was him,” she says, “until he said, ‘Hi, Emily, I’m Jake Schrum.’” Now close friends with the Schrum family, Stewart says that whether she is visiting the Southwestern campus or Katie in Atlanta or Libby Schrum ’00 in Maine, “Spending time with (them) always feels like coming home.” She especially likes that “Jake always has a joke for me—usually a pun!” Audrey Tinsley Hukari ’06 met Jake when she trans- ferred to Southwestern. She recalls that she would see him around campus, always approachable and often striking up conversations with students. “I always felt that even though I was just one of 1,300 or so students on campus, President Schrum cared about my (personal) success and experience at Southwestern,” she says, adding that “Jake and Jane’s love for Southwestern and the students is unparalleled.” David Briner ’13 had an experience not unlike Stewart’s or Hukari’s some 10 years ago. He says, “President Schrum’s unquestionable commitment to making everyone feel welcome on campus from the moment they arrive until long after they leave has helped to better students’ experiences and is a priv- ilege rarely offered at other prestigious universities.” Schroeder adds, “Jake is always willing and eager to help students with their career and advanced educa- tional goals; each year he writes numerous recom- mendations and reference letters and helps arrange contacts for Southwestern students and acquaintances alike.” Professor Emeritus of Mathematics John Chapman says, “Jake has guided students both in their academic studies and in their community service, indicating relationship between the two. The students appreciate that he makes a point of meeting them as they move into their dorms or eating with them in the cafeteria and showing an interest in their lives.” Non Quis Sed Quid Jim Walzel, a member of Southwestern’s Board of Trustees, says, “Jake is a great people person and a great spokesperson for the University. He’s accom- plished many significant things over the years.” While leading the largest fundraising effort in Southwestern history—the $150 million “Thinking When Jake B. Schrum ’68 became President of Southwestern University in 2000, his executive assistant, Francie Schroeder, quickly realized that the two of them had very different work habits. O Known and loved for his personable nature and sincere interest in the lives of Southwestern students, faculty and staff, “Jake is always willing and eager to help students...” (opposite). Serious or smiling — administrative head shots from Jake’s tenure as Vice President of Development (above). 7spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu
  • 8. Ahead” Campaign—Jake, with guidance from Provost Jim Hunt, envisioned a unique addition to the curric- ulum designed to help students integrate what they learn in the classroom with outside experiences such as civic engagement, intercultural learning and collaborative research projects. Jake’s ability to help secure an $8.5 million gift from the Priddy Charitable Trust enabled Southwestern to add the faculty members necessary to implement the orig- inal Paideia Program. Now the signature element of the University’s academic program, Paideia will be available to and required of all students in the fall of 2014. (See Page 14.) Jake has also overseen the renovation of several campus buildings, including The Alma Thomas Fine Arts Center and the Roy and Lillie Cullen Building, as well as the construction of The Wilhelmina Cullen Admission Center and the Charles and Elizabeth Prothro Center for Lifelong Learning. Both newly constructed buildings earned LEED certification, exem- plifying Southwestern’s commitment to sustainability. Sustainability has long been a focus of Southwestern students and subsequently of the Schrum presi- dency. Jake was an early signer of both the Talloires Declaration (an international effort to promote environmental sustainability in higher education) and the College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment. Student-led sustainability initiatives encouraged by Jake led to an agreement with the city of Georgetown enabling Southwestern to get all of its electricity from wind power for the next 18 years. Another priority of Jake’s presidency has been enhancing student life on campus, including the expansion of Southwestern’s varsity athletics offerings. Four new teams were started or announced during his tenure—softball, men’s and women’s lacrosse, and football. He has also worked continually on increasing the number of Southwestern students from under- represented groups. During his 13-year tenure, that number increased from 21.8 percent to 30 percent, and currently includes 18 percent Latino students. According to Georgetown Mayor George Garver, “Jake has helped lead a great liberal arts university with a gentle manner that radiates courtesy, good listening skills and creative insight.” Chapman adds, “It has been marvelous to work for and with one who is an intellectual, who under- stands the liberal arts education, and who is a believer in academic freedom.” Town/Gown Relations Beyond campus, Jake is a friend of the city of Georgetown. Former Mayor Gary Nelon says as Southwestern’s new president in 2000, Jake “hit the city by storm.” Thinking at the time that Georgetown was a town with a college, rather than a college town, Jake has worked tirelessly during his 13 years as President to improve and maintain close “town/ gown relations” with the city. Jake’s approachability helped him to “immediately fit right into the Georgetown life,” says Nell Benold ’48. To this day, he enjoys almost daily visits with patrons of the coffee shop on the Georgetown Square. An enthusiastic spokesperson for the University, many credit Jake with contributing greatly to connecting Southwestern and Georgetown more closely. “The relationship he helped to establish between the University and the city,” says Nelon, “will continue as a legacy to Jake long after his retirement.” Chapman and his wife Scherry have been friends with the Schrums since Jake was on the Southwestern staff in the 1970s and Jane taught with Scherry at Annie Purl Elementary School in Georgetown. They say, “We are lucky to have had Jake and Jane as part of our Southwestern life; bringing new programs to the community, supporting the arts, and contributing to the economic and cultural wealth of Georgetown.” “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” — Maya Angelou 8 Southwestern Magazine 2000 „ Jake B. Schrum ’68 is elected Southwestern’s 14th President „ Statement of Nondiscrimination and Domestic Partners Benefits Policy is added to existing policies in the Faculty, Staff and Student Handbooks as well as the University Catalog „ Author Joyce Carol Oates is the Writer’s Voice speaker „ Southwestern is included in an updated edition of the influential book Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About Colleges by Loren Pope (Southwestern was also included in the original version published in 1996) „ W. Joseph “Joey” King ’93 donates $500,000 to establish and endow the King Creativity Fund to annually support student projects 2001 „ Jimmy Carter, 39th President of the U.S., speaks at President Schrum’s inauguration; 5,000 people are in attendance. While on campus, Carter speaks on “Moral Leadership in a Global Society” as the Shilling Lecturer „ Author Russell Banks is the Writer’s Voice speaker „ Justice for All, a book edited by President Schrum, is published 2002 „ Southwestern receives $8.5 million from the Robert & Ruby Priddy Charitable Trust of Wichita Falls, Texas to inaugurate the Paideia Program „ Marian Wright Edelman, William Sloane Coffin and John D. Maguire speak as the Shilling Lecturers „ Author Michael Chabon, “one of the most celebrated writers of his generation,” is the Writer’s Voice speaker „ Princeton Review’s college guide rates Southwestern the nation’s 4th “Best Academic Bang for Your Buck” and one of the nation’s best 345 colleges A (short) Presidential Timeline
  • 9. Garver agrees, “Both Jake and Jane have always been willing to assist with any Georgetown function. We are very thankful for their commitment to the city.” Leading by Example Over the course of 13 years, Jake received three presidential leadership grants from The Mellon Foundation and helped secure the relocation of the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE) to Southwestern in 2009. Gene Tobin of The Mellon Foundation says, “The Mellon Foundation’s association with Jake Schrum began with a new president’s grant in 2001, near the beginning of his tenure. This relationship has evolved into a strong working partnership between the Foundation and Southwestern toward a mutual goal: the advancement, improvement and re-envisioning of liberal arts education for a new era. Jake has passion- ately supported undergraduate research, encouraged faculty efforts to integrate civic engagement into the curriculum, and actively collaborated with histori- cally black colleges and universities, research universi- ties, and Southwestern’s sister institutions within the Associated Colleges of the South and the Council of Independent Colleges. At a time when our country has most needed thoughtful, persuasive and experi- enced leaders, Jake has served Southwestern and the higher education community with distinction. We wish him the very best in the next chapter of his career, and know that he will continue to be a strong voice for educational quality and innovation.” An outspoken advocate of the liberal arts, Jake has written extensively on the topic. His brother Ev says, “Jake’s involvement in higher education comes from his concern that young adults are prepared to be good citizens of our planet. He especially appreciates the approach of liberal arts education that prepares students by teaching them to think and engaging them in the real world through actual contact with persons through projects and field experiences. This is why he is so passionate about our alma mater and why he has worked so hard to continue to help make Southwestern relevant.” Known also for giving their all to their alma mater— wisdom, time and monetary resources—Jake and Jane often participate in or attend a University event nearly every night of the week, as well as campus 9spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu 2003 „ U.S. News and World Report ranks Southwestern as one of “America’s Best Colleges” „ The Paideia Program is launched in September „ Jake B. Schrum is elected chair of the Board of Directors of Independent Colleges and Universities of Texas „ Southwestern faculty adds 10 new members „ Southwestern is listed in Barron’s 2003 Best Buys in College Education „ Fiske Guide to Colleges names Southwestern among the best 295 colleges in the country 2004 „ Nobel Peace Prize winner The Archbishop Desmond Tutu speaks as the Shilling Lecturer „ Southwestern receives $3 million gift from The Cullen Trust for Higher Education for the century-old Roy and Lillie Cullen Building restoration „ Southwestern is awarded a $60,000 grant for collaborative work between faculty and students in the Chemistry and Biology Departments „ Playwright Tony Kushner is the Writer’s Voice speaker „ Mike Timlin ’88 helps the Boston Red Sox win the World Series „ The Princeton Review lists Southwestern as the nation’s #7 “best value” undergraduate institution 2005 „ Pirate Bikes debut on campus in memory of Walter “Wally” P. Meyer ’86 „ The Perkins-Prothro Foundation gives a gift for the building of the Charles and Elizabeth Prothro Center for Lifelong Learning „ Living/Learning Communities are implemented for first-year students „ Former Prime Minister of Pakistan Benazir Bhutto speaks as the Shilling Lecturer „ Novelist Carlos Fuentes is the Writer’s Voice speaker Jake and Jane take a spin on a Pirate Bike built for two during Homecoming and Reunion Weekend 2005 (top). President Schrum dedicates the Charles and Elizabeth Prothro Center for Lifelong Learning on March 11, 2010 (above).
  • 10. 10 Southwestern Magazine „ Southwestern is one of five schools given full membership to the Institute for the International Education of Students 2006 „ “Pirate Cards” replace multiple card systems across campus „ Southwestern joins the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities „ Thomas H. Kean, chair of the 9/11 Commission, speaks as the Shilling Lecturer „ Poet Robert Pinsky is the Writer’s Voice speaker „ Southwestern is included in the third edition of the book Colleges That Change Lives „ A chapter of national leadership honor society Omicron Delta Kappa is chartered at Southwestern „ Southwestern launches “Thinking Ahead,” the University’s largest-ever fundraising campaign to fund priorities in the 2010 Strategic Plan „ To Survive and Excel: The Story of Southwestern University 1840–2000 by Professor Emeritus of History William B. Jones is published 2007 „ President Schrum signs the Talloires Declaration, adding Southwestern to the growing number of colleges committed to sustainable living „ James Baker III, former Secretary of State, speaks as the Shilling Lecturer „ Author Amy Tan is the Writer’s Voice speaker „ Southwestern is a founding partner of the Texas Life Sciences Commercialization Center in Georgetown „ Southwestern hosts inaugural Pirate Golf Classic held annually during Homecoming and Reunion Weekend „ The Princeton Review’s Best 366 Colleges ranks Southwestern #7 in the country for Best Career/ Job Placement Services „ The SMArT (Science and Math Achiever Teams) program begins with Southwestern students mentoring local elementary students
  • 11. 11spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu 2008 „ Men’s intramural lacrosse club becomes first university team in Texas to advance to the varsity level „ Former U.S. Senator Bill Bradley speaks as the Shilling Lecturer „ Author Azar Nafisi is the Writer’s Voice speaker „ The newly opened Dorothy Manning Lord Residential Center receives “Dorm of Distinction” recognition by University Business magazine „ Paideia scholars begin sending refurbished computers to Honduras „ The women’s golf team finishes third in NCAA Division III tournament 2009 „ Wangari Maathai, the first African woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize, speaks as the Shilling Lecturer; President Schrum signs the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment during the lecture „ Southwestern’s first “green” building, The Wilhelmina Cullen Admission Center, opens and earns gold LEED certification „ Author Tobias Wolff is the Writer’s Voice speaker „ Southwestern’s new varsity softball team makes its home debut against the University of Dallas „ The National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE) relocates its headquarters to the Southwestern campus; W. Joseph “Joey” King ’93 becomes the organization’s executive director „ President Schrum receives Hall of Fame Award from The National Hispanic Institute, founded by Ernesto Nieto ’64 „ Southwestern students revive the Brooks Prize Debate „ The Princeton Review’s, The Best 371 Colleges, lists Southwestern one of the “Easiest Campus to Get Around” „ The Chronicle of Higher Education lists Southwestern as one of 150 Great Colleges to Work For
  • 12. and community commitments on weekends. The Schrums also gave Southwestern the gift of the beau- tiful window over the entrance doors to the Lois Perkins Chapel. Ev Schrum shares that he was a classmate of Jane’s at Southwestern and says, “Jane has been, in her own right, an advocate of positive causes and a supporter of the things both she and Jake care about. My wife and I consider them to be our best friends; it is good when your relatives are also your friends.” Jake’s accomplishments during his tenure have made a strong impression even on recent graduates like Briner, who says, “Leading by example is one of the hardest achievable qualities that any person can hope to accomplish in their lifetime. In my four years on campus, I have clearly seen President Schrum’s unquestionable commitment to every student, faculty member and member of the staff; his leadership has helped to keep the Southwestern community together through turbulent times.” Colin Berr ’13 says Jake is always open to student ideas. “He invited me to stop by his office any time I wanted to share an idea, so I met with him in my junior year when I worked on the Georgetown public transit effort with Student Congress. He said the University would follow the student lead, as it had with the wind power idea in 2009.” With Jake’s support, Berr and his fellow committee members felt confident they had the backing of the University when it came time to meet with off-campus groups and city officials. He says, “President Schrum’s ability to keep track of 1,400 students—a quarter of whom are new every year—has a way of making you feel like you matter. I saw him on campus one time and just said, ‘Hey, Jake’ without thinking; that’s how comfortable he made me feel. It’s meaningful to see how he has impacted the lives of others. Knowing him has made my Southwestern Experience more enjoyable.” “No one better embodies what it means to Be Southwestern than Jake and Jane.” — Allison Dickson '02 12 Southwestern Magazine 2010 „ Southwestern signs an agreement with the city of Georgetown that will meet the University’s electric needs from wind power for the next 18 years „ The Charles and Elizabeth Prothro Center for Lifelong Learning opens and earns silver LEED certification „ Dr. William H. Foege of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation speaks as the Shilling Lecturer „ Film Director/Writer/Producer Mira Nair is the Writer’s Voice speaker „ Author John Pipkin is named Writer in Residence at Southwestern „ A report by the Sustainable Endowments Institute in Cambridge, Mass., states that Southwestern is one of the most sustainable colleges in Texas „ Southwestern commencement participants go green by wearing biodegradable robes „ Southwestern’s Board of Trustees approves Shaping Our Future: The Strategic Plan for Southwestern University 2010–2020 „ Southwestern becomes the new home to Georgetown’s Senior University 2011 „ Blake Mycoskie, founder of TOMS Shoes, speaks as the Shilling Lecturer „ Writer, editor and publisher Dave Eggers is the Writer’s Voice speaker „ President Schrum announces the addition of women’s lacrosse and the reinstatement of football to the University’s varsity athletics program „ Southwestern’s Athletics Department installs lights on the soccer/lacrosse competition field making night games possible for the first time „ Southwestern receives pledges of $1 million and $3 million respectively from The Fondren Foundation of Houston and The Cullen Foundation of Houston for Southwestern’s planned new science center President Schrum reflects on his relationship with the University prior to his inauguration (top right). The late Wangari Mathaai, 2004 Nobel Peace Prize winner and 2009 Shilling Lecturer, was joyful when President Schrum signed the American College and University President’s Climate Commitment (lower right).
  • 13. Be Southwestern The parent of a Southwestern graduate, Walzel came onto the Board of Trustees during former President Roy Shilling’s term and was asked by then-chair of the board Red McCombs ’49 to head the search for Shilling’s replacement. He recalls, “I was very excited to be the one to make the call to Jake to let him know he’d been elected. Since then, my granddaughter has become a Southwestern graduate, and Jake and Jane have become close family friends.” Benold reflects, “Jake’s many accomplishments at our beloved University have consistently added to her prestige and effectiveness for which all alumni are thankful.” Her husband, Dr. Douglas Benold ’44, a long-term member of Southwestern’s Board of Trustees, says, “In his role as President of our alma mater and through his establishment of Paideia, Jake has worked hard to impress on students and faculty the need for a combination of learning with a real concern for the good of mankind.” Another alumna, Allison Dickson ’02, had a unique but no-less-meaningful relationship with the Schrums. Needing full-time care and assistance due to Muscular Dystrophy, Dickson’s parents had to live on campus with her for four years. During that time, while she became a Tri-Delta sorority sister of Libby, her parents became friends of Jake and Jane. Through that family friendship, Dickson says she “saw firsthand Jake’s lead- ership skills and learned from him the importance of dreaming big, thinking outside of the box, staying true to one’s core values, and always putting the best interests of current and future SU students first.” Dickson believes, “No one better embodies what it means to Be Southwestern than Jake and Jane. As students, alumni, parents, administrators, donors and the First Family, they have believed in and lived out our University’s core values in every way … When they look back on the lives they’ve changed—including mine—I hope they are proud.” Note: President Schrum recently announced that he will become president of Emory & Henry College in Emory, Virginia following his retirement from Southwestern. His term at Emory & Henry will begin Aug. 1, 2013. 13spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu 2012 „ New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman speaks as the Shilling Lecturer „ Playwright and screenwriter Suzan-Lori Parks is the Writer’s Voice speaker „ Southwestern is included in the fourth edition of the book Colleges That Change Lives „ Forbes magazine ranks Southwestern in the top 100 colleges and universities in the U.S. and second in Texas „ U.S. News & World Report features Southwestern in its “College Road Trip” series „ President Schrum announces he will retire in July 2013, culminating 13 years as Southwester’s 14th President „ Southwestern is one of 47 colleges selected to participate in a $50 million science education initiative sponsored by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI). „ President Schrum receives a third Presidential Leadership Grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation „ For the second year in a row, Southwestern is number one in the SCAC in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s College & University Green Power Challenge „ Southwestern receives a $500,000 grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to help make Paideia available to all students in fall 2014 2013 „ World-renowned conservationist and United Nations messenger of peace Jane Goodall is the Shilling Lecturer „ Southwestern officially launches the HHMI-Southwestern Inquiry Initiative „ Southwestern receives a $1 million challenge grant from the J.E. and L.E. Mabee Foundation of Tulsa, Okla., to help begin building phase one of the new science center „ Southwestern’s Board of Trustees announces the election of Edward B. Burger as the University’s 15th President The Paideia Program will always be associated with the Schrum legacy at Southwestern. Once an innovative co-curricular program serving roughly 250 students, Paideia will be the core of the Southwestern educational experience for all students, beginning in fall 2014. The Jake B. and Jane W. Schrum Paideia Fund will support Schrum scholarships and fellowships. Schrum Scholarships will be awarded to students who meet Southwestern University’s requirements for financial assistance. Schrum Fellowships will be awarded to people who have achieved distinction in their chosen career and who agree to spend a period of time on the University campus participating in the Paideia experiences of students. Every Gift Matters! www.southwestern.edu/giving/schrum-paideia Honor Jake and Jane Schrum’s years of service to Southwestern University by making a gift to the Jake B. and Jane W. Schrum P a i d e i a F u n d
  • 15. Tradition! Most colleges and universities have their own traditions, and Southwestern is no excep- tion. The University’s rich heritage and storied tradi- tions are what legends are made of. One of those (not so legendary) traditions has been the course registra- tion process. As recently as eight years ago, students participated in the tradition of gathering in the Corbin J. Robertson Center to register for classes—Black Friday style—to get any course still available that fulfilled a general education requirement. Beginning in the fall of 2014, the tradition of merely checking off gen. ed. requirements will be a thing of the past at Southwestern. Paideia is about to become part of every student’s Southwestern Experience, and facilitating a variety of interdisciplinary experiences will become an integral and integrated part of the Southwestern curriculum. Developed in 2003 by President Jake B. Schrum ’68 and Provost Jim Hunt, the Paideia Program sought to bring together traditional academics with civic engagement and intercultural learning, but to date it has only been available to a small subsection of our students. In an effort to include more students and faculty and to more strongly integrate various aspects of learning, a team of faculty, staff and students formed a committee to develop an idea for a Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP), which is a significant element in Southwestern’s re-accreditation process. The idea, developed over the course of two years, was a re-imagining of Paideia that would include all students and significantly more faculty members, and would become the foundation for the Southwestern curriculum. According to Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, “Contemporary social and political problems require the ability to integrate multiple approaches and perspectives.” However, she says these kinds of conversations have happened primarily in offices or hallways or residence halls. “We haven’t had time or space in the curriculum to build on these conversations with any kind of intentionality,” she says. But faculty and staff across campus are working to change that by expanding the reach of Paideia and by building interdisciplinarity into the heart of the academic program. Professor of Kinesiology Jimmy Smith explains that Paideia will allow students to take at least three courses intentionally clustered around shared content—a theme—and a Paideia seminar in the junior or senior year. The initial three themes are “Mediterranean Mingling,” “Representing Gender” and “Global Health.” Faculty from all disciplines teaching courses within each theme will interact with one another to ensure that connections are being made across the classes students are taking in each of the clusters; the seminars will bring all of this together in a culmi- nating experience. The clustered courses will give students the space and tools to reflect on the overlaps and differences between disciplines, with guidance and support from faculty. The interdisciplinary Paideia seminars will provide the opportunity to individually and collec- tively reflect on students’ cumulative experiences within the theme. By bringing together faculty from different departments to cover a central question or idea—such as a philosopher and a political scientist, both discussing representations of gender—the semi- nars will allow students to learn alongside faculty in the classroom; everyone will be bringing different knowledge and experiences to the table. Kafer says that students are excited to talk about how what they’re learning in one class informs or extends the work they’re doing in another class. By intention- ally encouraging students to think about how they can ask the same questions across different disciplines, and exploring how their methods, assumptions or answers shift across different sites, Paideia will give students an opportunity to collaborate with each other and with faculty over the course of several years. “One of the things I most love about teaching at Southwestern is how frequently I am surprised by my students,” says Kafer. “They are always helping me change the way I see the world. What Paideia does is create more such opportunities—now I will have more of these moments with more students as well as with my faculty and staff colleagues.” Alison Marr, assistant professor of mathematics, adds, “We’re creating a community that understands, respects and appreciates interdisciplinarity. Paideia is no longer for select faculty and students. All students ...In 10 years, any visitor to our campus should know what some of the current Paideia themes are just by walking around, because the entire community will be engaged in various conversations around a handful of topics. BeyondBetaPaideia Connects the Dots 15spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu
  • 16. and a majority of faculty will be participating, thus creating a campus-wide dialogue on the themes.” Students will be learning how philosophy and polit- ical science sometimes cover similar territory, but that each field formulates its questions differently, or how one can read the same book in both a religion course and a literature course and get something completely different out of it each time. As students and faculty bring different knowledge and experiences to the table, Southwestern brings interdisciplinarity to the heart of its academic program. By doing so, Southwestern is striving to make sure all of our students understand how to apply multiple disciplines to a single problem. Marr says, “The student who can walk away with an understanding of how to do that will be more successful in the ever-changing world and will be able to solve problems in a more creative way. The fact is that the ability to think about problems from multiple disciplines is a skill many employers and graduate schools find valuable.” Katy Ross, associate professor of Spanish and co-coordinator for the Mediterranean Mingling cluster, hopes that Paideia will allow students and faculty to interact in new and dynamic ways and that, by exploring the interdisciplinary nature of ideas, students will be able to view problems—and solve them—in new, unexpected ways outside their univer- sity experience. How will Paideia encompass all of campus, not just faculty and students? Dana Hendrix, head of collec- tion development and acquisitions for the A. Frank Smith, Jr. Library Center, says for example, that she and other librarians plan to “work to connect Paideia students with the resources, concepts and skills they Global Health How do culture, age and sex shape societal and individual definitions of health? In this cluster, students will explore the factors that lead to health and healthcare disparities within and across nations, as well as develop ideas on how to improve outcomes through inter- ventions at the individual, institutional and governmental levels. Representing Gender How do sex and gender vary across space, place and time? Why is the world sexed and gendered? What are the consequences of living in a sexed and gendered world? Inside and outside the class- room, students will analyze how gender and sexuality are repre- sented in different disciplines and explore the points of sympathy that exist across different fields of study while developing an under- standing of areas of tension and conflict. Mediterranean Mingling How does a part of the world famous for its wine, olives and cheese, serve as a model for understanding global issues? Studying the Mediterranean—a sea of intersections and fluid borders—will help students see what is at the core of global connection and conflict. The cultural, historical and ecological complexity where Europe, Asia and Africa meet invites multiple perspectives and engages a broad range of interests, from art to food, faith to poli- tics, language to literature. Forty-six current first-year students have applied for their theme and will begin their clus- tered courses in fall 2013. First year 2013/14 students will apply as well. Beginning in fall 2014, all Southwestern students will be involved in Paideia clusters. Paideia2.0 16 Southwestern Magazine One of the coordinators of the Global Health cluster, Associate Professor of Biology Maria Cuevas seeks close collaboration with students in the classroom and in the laboratory (right).
  • 17. need for research and exploration as they progress through the program and complete their interdisci- plinary Paideia seminar work.” Civic engagement and intercultural learning will continue to be important aspects of Paideia. Sarah Brackmann, director of civic engagement, is excited that through community-engaged learning, “we’re going to be connecting the intellectual with the action and activism in intentional, integrated and interdis- ciplinary ways to create relevant opportunities—not just volunteerism but experiential learning experi- ences—for our students.” Kim Murphy, assistant dean for academic success and director of records, sees the advising experience being transformed as a result of Paideia as well. “The guided process of pulling together seemingly dispa- rate ideas is healthy and exciting for both students and advisers,” she says. The general consensus seems to be that Paideia will provide all campus constituents with more opportuni- ties to think critically about how to connect what we do in the classroom to the communities around us. How can alumni, parents, donors and friends of the University participate? Marr suggests, “Alumni can participate in lecture series, panels and extra- curricular events related to the themes. Community members can find ways to connect to themes and suggest possible partnerships for civic engagement projects. Donors can think creatively about ways contributions to Paideia could help strengthen the program (scholarships for study abroad, contribu- tions to the library, funds for themed-based housing, support for additional faculty interested in interdis- ciplinarity, and more).” The importance of interdisciplinarity, says Smith, is that “the great issues and problems facing the world cannot be addressed or solved by viewing and attacking them from a single perspective ... and there- fore require an approach that embraces the knowledge, methodology and perspectives of several academic disciplines. In other words, they require an interdis- ciplinary approach.” Kafer explains, “Clustering courses around themes will enable faculty to develop relationships with each other, to enrich their understanding of interdisci- plinary perspectives, and to experiment with team- teaching, collaborative teaching, and creative new pedagogies and methodologies.” The benefits of Paideia are many. In addition to helping new and prospective students better under- stand the liberal arts, Kafer says that it also provides a way for students to think about education in terms of what interests them, to address different ideas in different ways, and to learn how they relate. For faculty, she says, “it will provide opportunities to talk about teaching together, to share ideas and teaching methods, and to collaborate. As a faculty member, it is providing me the chance to learn from my colleagues.” The thought among Paideia faculty is that in 10 years, they will be more conversant with what their colleagues are doing; that students will better under- stand how classes can and do relate; that more and more, the library will be a place for gathering and interacting; and that there will be a vibrant culture of civic engagement and collaborative teaching and learning. Marr suggests that in 10 years, any visitor to our campus should know what some of the current Paideia themes are just by walking around, because the entire community will be engaged in various conversations around a handful of topics. Though “interdisciplinarity” is a word that is frequently encountered in academia these days, few institutions have made a concerted, university-wide effort to both define interdisciplinarity and to create an academic experience that truly is interdisciplinary in nature. “Paideia will make Southwestern unique among liberal arts colleges,” says Smith. While studying abroad in Xi’an, China in spring 2010, Elizabeth Wilson ’11 rode in a camel caravan in the Taklamakan Desert (top). Twenty-five students, including junior David Boutté, spent their Spring Break in the Gila Wilderness in New Mexico as part of the Destination: Service program (above). 17spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu
  • 18. 18 Southwestern Magazine 1 2 3 Which of your classmates (and professor)... „ had a “Question Authority” bumper sticker on their Trans-Am? „ is now employed by the National Institute for Technology in Education (NITLE)? „ was awarded a badge of honor for preparing soldiers for deployment? „ has authored a book translated into four languages and published in five countries? „ holds two Masters of Divinity and Theology Degrees and a Ph.D. (with honors) in philosophy and theology from Princeton Theological Seminary? „ is an expert in counter terrorism analysis? „ recently moved from a climate with regular 100+ Fahrenheit temperatures to one known for it’s sub-zero weather? „ is a University Scholar? „ was a Pirate on the soccer field? „ is a member of Alpha Xi Delta Fraternity? „ is the author of a best-selling book on conservative politics? „ is a “force to be reckoned with?” „ is a current master’s degree candidate at Northwestern University, Southwestern’s theoretical “sister school”?
  • 19. Be(ing) Southwestern five exceptional pirates sit for a quick sketch Photography by Lance Holt The theme of Homecoming and Reunion Weekend 2012 was “Be Southwestern.” A number of times during the weekend, people asked Southwestern staff members what the phrase means. The answer often began with, “It’s more than a Twitter hashtag.” But, the serious answer is that it means something different to each member of the Southwestern community. One might “Be Southwestern” by wearing a Pirate Athletics t-shirt; another might be active in his or her local alumni association. You may “Be Southwestern” by giving each year to the Southwestern Fund or by hiring a Southwestern student as an intern in your office. And many believe that to “Be Southwestern” means to take what you have learned into the world and make, as our Core Purpose states, “...contribu- tions toward the well being of humanity.” The 2012 alumni awards—presented during Homecoming by The Association of Southwestern University Alumni—recognized and honored five such community members who exemplify the University’s Core Values in their everyday lives. They are true to themselves and others. They promote a passion for intellectual growth. They respect the worth and dignity of persons. They encourage activism in the pursuit of justice and the common good. And, they cultivate academic excellence. 19spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu alumni spotlight 5 4 Read about these outstanding representatives of Southwestern at www.sualumni.net/awards 1. Farhana Mahmood Qazi ’96 Distinguished Humanitarian 2. Susannah Prucka ’03 Distinguished Young Alumna 3. Jay Richards ’89 Distinguished Professional 4. Georgianne Hewett ’90 Distinguished Southwestern Service 5. Eric Selbin, Professor of Political Science and University Scholar Mr. Homecoming „ is an expert in Comparative Politics (Comparative Revolutions; Contentious Politics; Latin American and Caribbean Politics; Ideologies); International Politics (Peace and Conflict); and Political Sociology? „ keeps in contact with former students long after they graduate? „ name means joyful, happy and cheerful (in the Muslim culture)? „ is a Tri-Delta sorority member? „ teaches in the Political Science Department at University of Maryland-Baltimore County?” „ was also employed by Southwestern for 14 years? ANSWERS:3,4,1,5,3,1,4, 5,2,2,3,2,4,5,5,1,4,2,4
  • 20. “I am deeply humbled and honored by this invitation to serve as president of such a special liberal arts institution—an institu- tion that is able to embrace its noble tradi- tions while reimagining education in this new century with innovation, creativity and wisdom,” said Edward B. Burger on his appointment as the 15th president of Southwestern University. The Francis Christopher Oakley Third Century Professor of Mathematics from Williams College in Williamstown, Mass., Burger received in 2010 the prestigious Robert Foster Cherry Award for Great Teaching from Baylor University, where he subsequently spent a year teaching and a year as vice provost for strategic educational initiatives. Burger graduated summa cum laude with distinction in mathematics from Connecticut College and has been a faculty member at Williams since 1990. However, he is no stranger to Central Texas, having earned his Ph.D. from The University of Texas at Austin. He has also been a resi- dent of Austin for the past several months while shooting instructional math videos for elementary school students. In 1997, Burger became one of the first individuals to make instructional math videos accessible to a broad audience through mediums such as CD-ROMs and the Internet. Since then, he has created more than 3,000 such videos covering curriculum from kindergarten through college-level mathematics that have helped millions of students worldwide. Named to the Huffington Post list of “Game Changers” in 2010—a group of 100 “innovators, mavericks, visionaries and leaders ... who are changing the way we look at the world and the way we live in it”—Burger has also received a number of national awards, including the 2001 Deborah and Franklin Tepper Haimo National Award for Distinguished College or University Teaching of Mathematics, and the Chauvenet Prize from the Mathematical Association of America. In January 2013 he was inducted as one of the first Fellows of the American Mathematical Society. A noted scholar, Burger has authored or co-authored more than 35 research articles (with 15 undergraduate co-authors) as well as 12 books including his most recent, The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking, co-authored with Michael Starbird from The University of Texas at Austin. He has delivered more than 400 lectures worldwide and has appeared on more than 40 radio and TV programs. His appear- ance on an episode of NBC’s “Science of the Winter Olympics” series earned him a Telly Award. Burger has been described as “an eloquent spokesperson for the liberal arts.” In addi- tion, Elaine Craddock, professor of reli- gion at Southwestern and a member of the Presidential Search Committee, says, “Ed is the quintessential teacher-scholar with sterling academic credentials who publishes widely but who also focuses on undergraduate education. He understands Southwestern’s vibrant interdisciplinary curriculum and how to nurture deeper creativity and innovation.” Burger says, “Southwestern is a leader in offering profound, life-changing expe- riences that allow individuals to see them- selves and their world in a richer, more focused way. I am excited by the energy and creativity that seems to permeate throughout the Southwestern community, particularly through the evolution of Paideia.” Burger will succeed President Jake B. Schrum ’68 on July 1, 2013. Burger Elected 15th President Williams College Professor of Mathematics to take helm July 1 On Feb. 20, 2013, reknowned mathematician and winner of the Robert Foster Cherry Award for Great Teaching at Baylor University, Edward B. Burger, was named Southwestern’s 15th president. PhotobyLanceHolt 20 Southwestern Magazine on campus www.southwestern.edu/newsroom
  • 21. Sophomores Kelsey Abel, Nathan Balke and Chandler Johnson were awarded the $2,500 Walt Potter Prize for their 2012–2013 King Creativity Fund-sponsored project. “I was very surprised to hear that we had won, but it was very affirming of what we chose to do,” Abel says. “On a base level, we just made a dome, but perhaps what brought this project to the next level was the focus on what could be done with this design, specifically in the humanitarian aspects of housing the needy.” Paul Gaffney, dean of the Sarofim School of Fine Arts and coordinator of the King Creativity Fund, says the Potter Prize selec- tion committee chose the low-cost eco dome project because it was a good example of taking a creative new approach to an existing idea. “While geodesic domes have been around for a while, this team took a new approach to figuring out how (they) can be constructed quickly, cheaply and using locally available materials,” he says. Balke, a physics and German major, says, “I wanted to do something to broaden my experience outside the classroom. Professor of Physics Steve Alexander (suggested) a dome project and it seemed like a good fit.” Alexander says he challenged Balke with making something that would be more efficient and less expensive than what is currently on the market. Johnson says the team plans to apply for another King Creativity Fund grant next year to work on developing a marketing plan for the dome. The King Creativity Fund was established in 2000 with an endowment provided by W. Joseph “Joey” King ’93. It is designed to support “innovative and visionary proj- ects” proposed by Southwestern students. The Walt Potter Prize is named for Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science Walt Potter, who mentored King as a Southwestern student. Balke enlisted Abel, a physics major, and Johnson, an architecture major, to work with him on the project. He says the team’s biggest challenge was finding the best design for the hubs that would hold the various pieces together (see photo left). Alexander says the students’ hub design can be used with a variety of different mate- rials, including metal pipe, wooden beams, bamboo or PVC. And, the same hub design can be used to build different types of geodesic domes. Throughout the project, people suggested numerous possible uses for the dome struc- ture—everything from greenhouses to emer- gency shelters and storage units to sunrooms. The trio is currently looking at alterna- tive materials and working on getting their creation into large-scale production. Eco Dome Takes Top Creativity Prize one structure, multiple uses $1 Million Science Challenge Southwestern plans to break ground on its new science center in late 2013, thanks to a $1 million challenge grant the University has received from the J.E. and L.E. Mabee Foundation of Tulsa, Okla. If $1 million in matching funds is raised by the end of 2013, the University will have the $8 million needed to begin work on the first phase of the project, which will add 23,700 square feet of space to Southwestern’s existing Fondren-Jones Science Hall. The second phase will be the complete remodeling of the original 1954 section of the building, followed by a new three-story entrance on the northwest side. When complete, the building will have 103,000 square feet for classrooms, offices, seminar rooms and laboratories. The total cost of the new science center is projected to be $24 million. Additional gifts have been received to support phase one of the science center project, including $3 million from The Cullen Foundation, $1 million from The Fondren Foundation, $1 million from The Brown Foundation, Inc., and $250,000 from the Albert and Margaret Alkek Foundation. To learn more or to make a gift in support of the sciences at Southwestern, visit www.southwestern.edu/giving/sciences/. 21spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu
  • 22. As a senior volleyball player, Rachel Thibodeau ’13, received one of only 58 NCAA postgraduate scholarships given across all NCAA divisions to 2012–13 fall sports athletes. Unsure she was qualified for the award, Thibodeau says she was reassured that she would be a strong candidate by Volleyball Coach Hannah Long and Director of Intercollegiate Athletics Glada Munt. “Knowing that they both thought I was a worthy candidate was an honor in itself,” she says. “When I realized that I was one of only 29 female athletes to receive the schol- arship, I was unbelievably honored.” To qualify for the award, student-athletes must excel academically and athletically, maintaining at least a 3.2 grade-point average, among other requirements. A psychology major and member of the SU women’s volleyball team, Thibodeau achieved a 4.0 GPA and received numerous athletic awards including SCAC Player-of- the-Year, CoSIDA Academic All-District First Team and AVCA Third Team All-America. For Thibodeau, the best thing about being an athlete at Southwestern was having the opportunity to not only compete on a nationally recognized volleyball team, but also to be involved in several campus orga- nizations and to build relationships with students and professors off the court. “Receiving this award was essentially the culmination of everything I hoped to achieve as a Division III athlete: excelling both academically and athletically,” she says. Thibodeau says she will use the $7,500 award—given specifically for the purpose of funding graduate school—toward her pursuit of a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology with an emphasis on child development and neuroscience at the University of Alabama. Thibodeau ’13 Garners Top Undergraduate Award If you’ve been on campus in the past six months—or if you’ve driven past the east side of campus on Highway 29—you have seen some major projects going on. Where you see the heavy equipment moving around on the former golf course is where the new football field house, athletics fields and track will be. According to Glada Munt, director of inter- collegiate athletics, the project remains on target for an Aug. 1 completion. The field house is near completion and the turf on the practice fields has been rolled out. The yet-to-be-named field house will include coaches’ offices, a weight room for all Southwestern athletes—set up for strength training, conditioning and power lifting—and a locker room for the football and men’s lacrosse teams. Munt says the new, 30-inch lockers will hold uniforms, pads, helmets and more. “Our current 14-inch lockers don’t even hold a typical men’s basketball shoe,” she explains. Another positive feature of the locker room will be the addition of a machine called an Ozoner, in which players put their pads, uniforms, hats and gloves for 30 minutes and it kills the bacteria. “That means no more locker room odor, and we’re all happy about that!,” says Munt. In addition to the field house, the east end of campus will be home to two lighted multi-purpose athletics fields, a throwing area for discuss and shot-put, and a running track. “We have a five-time Olympian as our track coach and this is the first time we’ve had a track on campus,” Munt says. “We’re thrilled!” Further up the hill, where there was once a grassy slope outside the Robertson Center facing the baseball field, will soon be the Coach Jim Mallon Field House (informally called the new baseball locker room). Munt says the building will be ready for use by the fall semester. Facilities Stay on Target PhotobyLanceHolt 22 Southwestern Magazine pirate athletics www.southwesternpirates.com
  • 23. Swimmers Ivan Cruickshank and Tommy Frashier have combined their love of the water with another unlikely passion— singing. Do they sing in the locker room shower? That’s confidential, but the two did join voices on the pool deck to sing the National Anthem prior to a home swim meet in January. Frashier, a sophomore business major with a political science minor, says the best advice he’s received to date was given by swimmer Adrian Gomez, who often said at practice, “The best get better by working on what they aren’t good at.” Frashier thinks the worst mistake for new students is to be too worried to do anything but the minimum. “All of the great rewards come from the extras,” he says. In February, Frashier’s hard work and participation in the “extras” paid off with a 1st place finish in the 500 Freestyle with a time of 4:39.97, setting a new school record. In addition to being a member of the swim team, Frashier is also a member of the SU Chorale and Student Congress. Off campus, he is a volunteer English as a Second Language teacher at First United Methodist Church in Georgetown. Cruickshank is a senior biology major and a member of the SU Chorale. He has been a member of Southwestern’s record-breaking freestyle and medley relay teams, as well as a leader in the individual freestyle and backstroke events. Singing in the (Locker Room) Shower Ivan Cruickshank and Tommy Frashier make a splash in song as they sing the National Anthem before the start of a January 2013 swim meet. Both are members of the swim team as well as the SU Chorale. See the video at www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=620177592357. 23spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu Another “alumni-driven project, supported in spirit by the University,” says Glada Munt, is one that baseball alumni Pat Leonard ’90 and Danny Mickan ’84 conceived to install a life-size bronze statue of the late Coach Jim Mallon overlooking the baseball field. “Looking out over the east side of campus was Coach Mallon’s favorite view,” says Munt. The former Pirates received the blessing of Mallon’s wife and sons for the memorial and are now in the process of funding its cost through dona- tions from other Southwestern alumni. The statue should be installed some time during the 2013–14 academic year. This fall, K-MAC Sports will provide audio and HD video play-by-play action and sports commen- tary for all 10 (home and away) football games. Log on to kmacsports.com to learn more. Pirate fans are also able to get in on the action of volleyball, baseball, softball, men’s and women’s basketball, lacrosse and soccer home conference games—audio only via kmacsports.com and video via CollegeTVTicket at collegetvticket.com. Jim Mallon on Deck Former players receive go-ahead to fund bronze PIRATESONTHE(AIR)WAVES
  • 24. The Original Social Network The following Class Notes were submitted June 30–Dec. 31, 2012. Share your accomplishments, achievements and life milestones with friends and classmates! Submit your Class Note by visiting www.sualumni.net. Select “Connect” from the main menu, then “Class Notes.” You may also email your Class Note to alumni@southwestern.edu. 1955 Ann Truog Hardy, Colleyville, has won a number of awards in the past year including “Best Painting” in the National Exhibition of American Women Artists and “Best of Show” for 2012 in the Texas and the Neighbors Regional Art Exhibition. She was recently accepted into Western Oil Painters of America, an organization “dedi- cated to preserving and promoting excellence in repre- sentational art.” Ann can be found regularly painting in her treehouse studio and studying to hone her skills. She is also a mentor for disadvantaged students aged 10–13, teaching them to paint and about the “disciplines of life.” Her work can be seen at www.annhardy.com. 1961 William Seale, Jasper, see The Rev. Milton Jordan Jr. ’62. 1962 The Rev. Milton Jordan Jr., Georgetown, is the co-author of a book published in Oct. 2012 titled “Just Between Us: Stories and Memories from the Texas Pines.” His friend, William Seale ’61, was a contrib- utor to the book. The stories included in the book “are firsthand accounts by those who know the region [East Texas] best, and they serve as glimpses into life in the Pine Belt that to this point have not been recorded or widely shared.” 1967 The Honorable Sen. Joan Bray, St. Louis, Mo., was a 2012 recipient of the Starkloff Legacy Award by Paraquad, a company whose mission is to “empower people with disabilities to increase their indepen- dence through choice and opportunity.” The award is presented to an individual who has dedicated their life to promoting positive change for people with disabilities. 1969 Fleming Crim, Madison, Wis., was selected by the National Science Foundation to serve as assis- tant director for the Directorate of Mathematical and Physical Sciences. 1979 Shirley Tatum, Stillwater, Okla., earned her Master of Library Science degree from Emporia State University in Dec. 2011. She is the Research and Instruction Librarian at Langston University. 1980 Peggy Palmer Francis, San Antonio, was the recipient of two awards in 2012. She was presented the Nursing Leadership Award by the Medical Center Rotary Club of San Antonio, and the Texas Nurse Practitioner of the Year Award by the Texas Nurse Practitioners. Peggy is a nurse practitioner with Urology San Antonio. 1982 Robert Coats, Bloomington, is the band director for the Bloomington Independent School District. 1983 David Menconi, Raleigh, N.C., is the author of “Ryan Adams: Losering, A Story of Whiskeytown.” The book is a true story about the rise of the 1990s insurgent-country band “Whiskeytown.” Ryan Adams was a singer-song- writer for the band and Menconi witnessed the band’s rise to fame. Menconi has been the music critic at The News & Observer in Raleigh since 1991. His writing has appeared in Spin, Billboard and The New York Times. 24 Southwestern Magazine Alumni Council 2012–2014 Blake Stanford ’81 President Daryl Allen ’93 President-Elect Hector Ruíz ’10 Class Relations Chair Ed Ellis ’64 Nominations and Awards Chair Susan Peace Holley ’73 Homecoming and Reunions Chair Tim Treviño ’93 Local Associations Chair Harland DeWitt ’92 Alumni Connection Groups Chair Yesenia García ’03 Assembly Program Chair Marisela Treviño Orta ’99 Assembly Program Chair-Elect Ebony Rose ’02 Alumni Communications Chair Cynthia Olson Bourland ’89 Lifelong Learning Chair Matt ’80 and Donna Carter Worley ’80 At-large Members Chris Cragg ’83 At-large Member Pam Slaughter Bush ’76 Trustee Representative Sarah Puffer, Class of 2014 Student Representative Karen Hanson-Flowers ’75 Ex-officio, Annual Giving Board Chair class notes Class Notes on SUAlumni.net  Timely  Searchable by city or category  Exclusive to the SUAlumni.net community  Connected to individual member profiles Submit your class note through www.sualumni.net 1.  “Connect” from the menu bar and click on “Class Notes.” 2. Login. Click “Add Class Note.” 3. First-time user? Email alumni@southwestern.edu for your Constituent ID. REUNION YEAR
  • 25. 1984 Terry Whitley, Moody, was appointed a member of the Board of Trustees of the Graduate School of Banking at Louisiana State University in Oct. 2012. The school is a non-profit professional education program for bank officers and is sponsored by the Texas Bankers Association along with 14 other bankers’ associations in southern states. 1985 John Baldwin, McKinney, received his Master of Divinity degree and graduated magna cum laude from Perkins School of Theology. He is the Senior Minister at First United Methodist Church of Celina. 1986 Mark Graves, Plano, and his wife, Michelle, are adventuring around the South Pacific on their 38-foot sailboat. He remarks, “…we’re sailing west through French Polynesia to the Kingdom of Tonga, and then south to New Zealand. We’ll see where the winds take us from there…” Read about their travels in their blog http://svcheers.wordpress.com/. 1988 Tom Stell, Houston, was listed as one of Houston Press’ “100 Creatives” due to his work in the arts community as the executive director of Obsidian Art Space, which gives him an opportunity to write, direct and act. He is also a painter. 1989 Jerry Young, Houston, was included on the 2012 Texas and Louisiana Super Lawyers list. He was also selected as a Top 100 Texas Super Lawyer and a Top 100 Houston Super Lawyer. Super Lawyers is a rating service of outstanding lawyers who have attained a high degree of peer recognition and evaluations, professional achievement and independent research. 1991 William “Bill” Alexander, Houston, see Laura Brown Nelson ‘07. Danny Cohen, Westport, Conn., has changed careers from being a commodities trader to being a real estate broker. He joined the company Citi Habitats in May 2012. BIRTH: John and Jessica Dupont Dapper, Austin, a son, Ryan Douglas, Nov. 10, 2012. Join Us in the Crow’s Nest! Be Southwestern—Become an Admission Volunteer! Alumni have the opportunity to volunteer their time and talents in the recruitment of students for Southwestern University through the Admission Recruiting Efforts by Alumni (A.R.E.A.) program. Visit www.sualumni.net/ AREAvolunteers to volunteer, or join our Facebook group: www.facebook.com/Southwestern.AREA The Association is celebrating its 10th anniversary! In honor of this occasion, we would like your feedback. Visit www.sualumni.net/AlumniSurvey before June 10, 2013. In the meantime, join us in celebrating some of what we have achieved in 10 years: „ Dedication of the Jake B. ’68 and Jane Woodman Schrum ’70 Alumni Center. „ 14 local associations across the country. „ 19 alumni connection groups. „ 12 class reunions held annually. „ Homecoming and Reunion Weekend record attendance for 7 out of 10 years. „ Increasing number of alumni volunteers each year (598 individuals in 2012). 25spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu www.sUalumni.net alumni association
  • 26. 1992 Brian Hollis, San Francisco, Calif., has been working for inRESONANCE, a database solutions company, for the past six years. He implements FileMaker®-based solutions and trains users in independent school districts globally, allowing him to travel and explore the world. Joe Wilson, Highlands Ranch, Colo., see Darien Kubik Wilson ’93. 1993 Kate Eliassen Marley, Lincoln, Nebr., is an asso- ciate professor of biology and science division chair at Doene College in Crete, Nebr. She was named one of the 40 fellows in the PULSE program through the collab- orative effort of the National Science Foundation, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the National Institutes of Health. The effort supports a yearlong program in which Vision and Change Leadership Fellows consider and recommend models for improving under- graduate life sciences education. Darien Kubik Wilson, Highlands Ranch, Colo., is the vice president of Volare Systems, a software devel- opment company in Denver, Colo. Her husband, Joe Wilson ’92, is president of Volare Systems. In Oct. 2012, the company sponsored Colorado GiveCamp in Colorado Springs, a “weekend-long event where tech- nology professionals from designers, developers and database administrators to marketers and web strat- egists donate their time to provide solutions for non- profit organizations.” 1996 Keith McLemore, Buda, is the director of stra- tegic initiatives for the Texas Nursery & Landscape Association. He fondly remembers his days playing baseball at Southwestern and remarks, “…there is not a weed in [my] yard. It probably looks like a base- ball diamond.” BIRTH: Michael Rausch and Catherine Pi-Sunyer, Bainbridge Island, Wash., a son, Adam Francis Rausch, Jan. 29, 2012. 1997 Eric Batch, Carson, Calif., was presented the Award of Excellence by the American Heart Association (AHA). The award is the highest honor given to a staff member and is presented to recognize distinguished service in advancing the objectives of the AHA. Genevieve Durham DeCesaro, Lubbock, is an associate professor of dance and associate chair of the Department of Theatre and Dance at Texas Tech University. She has been named a 2012–2013 Integrated Scholar by the Office of the Provost at Texas Tech. She is one of 12 university faculty to be recognized with this distinction. 1998 BIRTHS: Kim and Chris Brown, Dallas, a son, Vance Andre, Dec. 31, 2012; Brad Nowak and Teena McClelland, Chicago, Ill., a daughter, Evan Laurel Nowak, July 15, 2012. 1999 Taryn Deaton, Alexandria, Va., earned a Master of Theological Studies degree in May 2012 from Palmer Theological Seminary of Eastern University in Philadelphia, Pa. 2000 Eryn Kaiser Barker, Portland, Ore., earned a Master of Education degree from the University of Portand. With an emphasis on English for Speakers of Other Languages, Eryn’s thesis examined the link between arts-integrated education and increased language profi- ciency in an immersion classroom. Brandon Reynolds, San Francisco, Calif., is the managing editor of SF Weekly, which publishes local public interest stories (including news, food, music and art scenes) and humor columns. Heather Reynolds, Seabrook, is the senior internal auditor at Furmanite Inc. in Houston. BIRTHS: Brian and Eryn Kaiser Barker, Portland, Ore., a son, Christopher, Sept. 2, 2012; Michael and Elizabeth Dinn Marsh ’01, San Antonio, triplet daughters, Nadine Elise, Denver Paige and Iyla Dinn, Nov. 20, 2012. 2001 Tricia Mein Bruce, Maryville, Tenn., earned her Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 2006. She is an assistant professor of sociology at Maryville College where her research and teaching includes the sociology of religion, social movements, Catholicism, immigration, organizations and applied sociology. She is the author of a book published in 2011 titled “Faithful Revolution: How Voice of the Faithful Is Changing the Church.” Brian Burckhardt, Boerne, opened a pottery gallery in Comfort in July 2012. Hill Country Pottery features Brian’s work as well as that of other local artisans, including painters and metal artists. The opening of the gallery included Americana musician and class- mate Eric Hanke. Oh Snap! The 4th annual OH SNAP! Festival will take place Saturday, July 13, at the historic Scoot Inn in Austin. This benefit concert includes local bands, artists and food vendors; proceeds go to the Sergio Machado ’05 Memorial Scholarship. Members of the Southwestern community and all music lovers can remember Sergio and contribute to his legacy by attending the festival or by donating to the scholar- ship fund. For more information and ticket sales, visit www.ohsnapbenefit.com or www.southwestern.edu/ giving/machado. Lockett Leadership Society* Hector RuÍz ’10, Brownsville, is earning a Master of Accountancy degree at The University of Texas-Pan American and is a research assistant with the school’s Office of Rural Enterprise Development. Hector serves Southwestern as the Class Relations Chair on the Alumni Council for The Association of Southwestern University Alumni, a role he was appointed to in September 2012 to help strengthen alumni and student engagement. Similarly, his class- mates elected him the Class of 2010 Delegate on the Alumni Assembly for The Association in spring 2010. He keeps his classmates informed about each other, the University and The Association through the “Southwestern University – Class of 2010” group on Facebook. Hector’s interest in strengthening student relationships with alumni is exhibited through his work with Latinos Unidos and the Hispanic Alumni Connection Group, another affiliate of The Association. Most recently, he has collaborated with the Office of Admission to coordinate a recruitment event in the Valley as a volunteer with the Admission Recruiting Efforts by Alumni (A.R.E.A.) group. Hector remarks, “Being a member of the Southwestern family has opened my eyes, mind and heart. As an alumnus, my ongoing Southwestern Experience plays a role in my everyday life as I continue to learn and love within our close-knit community. We keep inspiring each other to value our diverse ways of thinking, respect all people and appreciate life.” *The Lockett Leadership Society recognizes alumni who serve Southwestern University and share the spirit of volunteerism demonstrated by McKenzie College alumnus and former Southwestern Trustee, Melville B. Lockett. The Locket Leadership Society was established Jan. 29, 2011. ’07’10 26 Southwestern Magazine ’05
  • 27. BIRTHS: Michael ‘00 and Elizabeth Dinn Marsh, San Antonio, triplet daughters, Nadine Elise, Denver Paige and Iyla Dinn, Nov. 20, 2012; Jenny Cuevas Tschirhart, Pflugerville, a daughter, Emmalyn Grace, Sept. 26, 2011. 2002 Melissa Iyer, Phoenix, Ariz., was named shareholder in July 2012 at Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A., the law firm where she has worked since 2006 representing govern- mental institutions and their elected officers. The firm remarks, “Melissa is a tremendous attorney and has had a prodigal career to date, including a key role in a landmark case before the Supreme Court of the United States [Horne vs. Flores]. Her abilities and intuitive insight about the law make her a tremendous asset to her clients and to the Firm.” Melissa was also selected as a Rising Star in the 2012 edition of Southwest Super Lawyers. Ebony Rose, Fort Worth, is the assistant director of the Texas Christian University Leadership Center. She oversees campus-wide educational programming and engagement opportunities for students to help develop their leadership potential in and out of the classroom. 2003 Tony Bonds, San Diego, Calif., is the author of “The Moonflower King” and the prose editor for the anthology “A Year in Ink, Volume 6.” BIRTHS: Anne Boswell and Gena McKinley, Austin, a son, Oliver Jude Boswell-McKinley, Sept. 23, 2012; Chris and Bethany Smith Scully, Falls Church, Va., a daughter, Lila Francis, Sept. 9, 2012. 2004 Scott Rocher, Atlanta, Ga., is a co-founder and chief technology officer of Tonx, a subscription coffee service based out of Los Angeles, Calif. MARRIAGE: Aaron Johnson to Kristin Grance ‘07 on June 23, 2012, living in Austin. BIRTHS: Teague and Kim Hull Bodley, Columbus, Miss., a daughter, Arden Elizabeth, Sept. 4, 2012; Sean ’05 and Ashley Still O’Neil, Jonestown, a son, Gavin James, Sept. 5, 2012. 2005 Blithe Casterline Rocher, Atlanta, Ga., is working as a postdoctoral fellow at Emory University. Lynn Tarkington, Houston, earned a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of Houston in Aug. 2012. BIRTHS: Beth Freed, Plano, a son, Eli Roger, May 30, 2012; Sean and Ashley Still O’Neil ’04, Jonestown, a son, Gavin James, Sept. 5, 2012; Christof Straub and Marcela Berdión-Straub, Houston, a son, Felix Pedro, July 12, 2012. 2006 Aubrey “Aubbie” Alexander, Salt Lake City, Utah, is a full time teaching assistant at the Violin Making School of America (VMSA). She graduated from VMSA with honors in 2011. Jim Silliman, Houston, has been selected by the State Bar of Texas, Law Student Division (LSD), to receive the 2012-2013 Legal Professionalism Award, which promotes professionalism among LSD members by “rewarding participation in activities that further the administration of justice, enhance responsibility and provide service to the public.” Jim is finishing his third year of law school at the University of Houston Law Center. Morgan Stewart, Mansfield, earned her Master of Science Education degree with an emphasis in environmental education from Texas Christian University in 2012. MARRIAGE: Kelsie Alstead to Michael Kiser on May 5, 2012, living in Houston. BIRTH: Michael and Kelsie Alstead Kiser, Houston, a daughter, Rylie Hope, Jan. 26, 2012. 2007 Michael Maine, Seattle, Wash., is one of nine selected artists to be featured throughout 2013 through the Community Supported Arts (CSA) program. The CSA’s mission is to “empower creativity by connecting art lovers with local artists, building a vibrantly creative community of thinkers, dreamers, artists and appreci- ators.” Michael uses photography, video and audio to empower people to find, develop and share their stories. MARRIAGES: Kristin Grance to Aaron Johnson ’04 on June 23, 2012, living in Austin; Kendall Pace to William Monroe Jr. on Jan. 28, 2012, living in Houston. 2008 Dominique Bertrand, Buffalo, N.Y., earned her Master in Anthropology degree with an emphasis in 27spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu Proud Pirates! Laura Brown Nelson ’07, Houston, is an assistant director of devel- opment at MD Anderson Cancer Center. In a twist of fate, Laura joined a group of Southwestern Pirates in the same office. William “Bill” Alexander ’91 has been at the Cancer Center for five years and is a senior asso- ciate director of development. Laura’s classmates Kendall Pace Monroe and Kate Bizzell are also assis- tant directors of development. This group of “four proud SU [alumni are] working to fight cancer” by raising money for research programs specifically for the Cancer Center. Laura says, “We all knew that, much like our experience at Southwestern, we wanted to work and learn somewhere that would challenge us, but also fuel our desire to give back to our community. All having our own personal stories and connections to the world of cancer, we each found ourselves at the number one cancer center and could not be more thrilled. We all agree that because of the individual attention, specialized classes and incredible culture we had access to at Southwestern, we are better professionals and community members.” ’07
  • 28. primatology from the University at Buffalo—The State University of New York. Andy Lee, El Paso, has been working at the El Paso ESPN radio affiliate KROD since 2008. In July 2012, ESPN El Paso launched “Sports Spin,” a two-hour local sports talk show hosted by Andy. 2009 Marie Franki, San Antonio, see Kelly Holt ‘11. Jaclyn “Jaci” Kramer, Austin, graduated from Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing with a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing in July 2012. She is a registered nurse working in a critical care unit at St. David’s Medical Center. Rachel Rigdon, Chicago, Ill., earned a master’s degree in rhetoric and public culture in Aug. 2012 from the School of Communication Studies at Northwestern University. She is working toward a Ph.D. at Northwestern. MARRIAGE: Rachel Rigdon to Michael Morgan on March 16, 2010, living in Chicago, Ill. 2010 Teryl Henderson, Austin, is the annual giving development specialist and phone program manager at The University of Texas at Austin. She manages more than 100 student callers, provides strategic insight to Colleges and Schools at UT, plans and creates yearly fundraising goals, and helps execute all annual giving campaign initiatives. Teryl continues to Be Southwestern by serving as the Class Agent for the Class of 2010. Allison Noblitt, Austin, see Kelly Holt ‘11. Jennifer Tindle, Houston, graduated with a Master of Accounting degree from Vanderbilt University in May 2012. Since completing her CPA exam in the summer of 2012, she has worked as an assurance associate at PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP. 2011 Tiffany Brigham, Denton, is pursuing a master’s degree in higher education from the University of North Texas. Recently, she was the Graduate of the Last Decade (G.O.L.D.) guest speaker at the Southwestern Snapshot – Dallas event co-hosted by The Dallas Association of Southwestern University Alumni and Southwestern’s Office of Admission. Mayra Gonzalez, Georgetown, is a financial accoun- tant at My Plates, a Texas-based company contracted by the Texas Department of Motor Vehicles to design, market and sell specialty license plates in the state of Texas. In 2013, GOLD alumni can double their gift-to-SU dollars through the GOLD Matching Gift Challenge. And, who doesn’t like a two-for-one deal? Support scholarships, student organizations, the Schrum Fund for Paideia, an academic department or an athletics team—your gift will be matched dollar-for-dollar. And, if you support the new Science Center, your 2013 gift will be quadrupled through the Mabee Foundation challenge grant. Because Graduates of the Last Decade make up more than a quarter of all Southwestern alumni, GOLD gifts are especially valuable! Don’t miss out on the GOLD Rush. Please make a gift today at www.southwestern.edu/giving. Graduates of the Last Decade, You Are as Good as GOLD! Every Gift Matters! 28 Southwestern Magazine
  • 29. Jean Meyer Riley ’37, Georgetown, Feb. 15, 2013 Rose Spacek Byrd ’38, Austin, June 7, 2012 Geraldine Davis Fox ’39, Granger, May 21, 2012 Edward R. Stanford Jr. ’40, Gaithersburg, Md., Aug. 9, 2012 Rae Hoyt Calvert ’42, Houston, Oct. 15, 2012 Posey Baggett Smith ’43, Andover, Kan., Nov. 17, 2012 Charles P. Godbey ’44, Dallas, June 18, 2012 Dorothea Bishop Noonan Cubberly ’45, Rosenberg, Oct. 8, 2012 Evelyn Pranglin Galloway ‘46, Pearsall, Jan. 5, 2013 Elizabeth Knox Hardy ’46, Lawton, Ok., May 24, 2012 Naida Richards Gibson ’47, Paducah, March 13, 2013 Clarence C. Schultz Jr. ’47, New Braunfels, Sept. 30, 2012 Bettye Jo Bjella ’47, Corpus Christi, Dec. 24, 2012 Max Curtis Jones ’47, Clute, Jan. 17, 2013 Mary Blunt Sherman ’48, Freeport, Jan. 17, 2013 James R. Underwood Jr. ’48, Austin, May 16, 2012 Earl C. Hancock ’49, Waco, June 4, 2012 Bettye Crow Lindenberg ’49, Seguin, Nov. 9, 2012 Louis Pitcock Jr. ’49, Dallas, March 22, 2013 Ralph H. Poteet ’49, Mesquite, Sept. 23, 2012 Tassie Barton Edwards ’50, Lufkin, Dec. 8, 2012 Dr. John W. Foster Sr. ’50, Midland, Oct. 19, 2012 Sherman R. Huie Jr. ’50, Dallas, Sept. 24, 2012 Henry F. Sheppard ’50, Cuero, Dec. 24, 2012 Marlee Baker ’51, Austin, May 19, 2012 Matt M. Dees Jr. ’51, San Antonio, Aug. 2, 2012 Mignonne Cloud Gaskey ’51, Houston, June 7, 2012 Fannie Janette Bowmer Holleman ’51, Burnet, May 3, 2012 Mary Marney Baltzelle ’52, Pompano Beach, Fla., Dec. 12, 2012 Elaine Broadwell Adair ‘52, Marshall, Dec. 21, 2012 Gloria Chamberlain Dorris ’52, Victoria, Nov. 22, 2012 Barbara Wolfskill Bahrt ’54, Richmond, Jan. 13, 2013 Larry M. Freeman ’54, Salado, Jan. 15, 2013 Mary Janice Powell Gore ’54, Austin, Dec. 25, 2012 Martha Pecora Cameron ’57, Austin, Dec. 10, 2012 Richard H. Jackson ’57, Claremont, Calif., Aug. 10, 2011 Lou Birdwell Parris ’57, Houston, Oct. 31, 2012 Genevieve Linnens Richardson ’57, Huntsville, Oct. 29, 2012 Patricia M. Quested ’57, Dallas, June 29, 2012 Warner T. Dahlberg ’58, Austin, Sept. 25, 2012 Jane Hiller Lamm ’60, Houston, Dec. 24, 2012 Windle J. Taylor ’60, Jarrell, July 19, 2012 Ralph D. Love Jr. ’61, Andice, July 24, 2012 Julie Johnson Poteet ’61, Lake Jackson, Oct. 3, 2012 Herman Bulman ’62, Houston, Nov. 11, 2012 Nancy Hart Dickinson ’62, Clarksdale, Miss., Aug. 11, 2012 Wilson E. Whitmire III ’65, Birmingham, Ala., Jan. 26, 2013 William Lee Carter III ’66, Dallas, Dec. 16, 2012 Ronald H. Bearden ’67, Round Rock, Nov. 29, 2012 Richard O. Luderus ’70, San Antonio, Sept. 5, 2012 Hugh M. Parrish ’72, Austin, Sept. 18, 2012 Pamela D. Whitfield ’72, East Tawakoni, June 6, 2012 Marcia Jean Mason McKemie ’75, Dale, Aug. 21, 2012 Carol Storter Masi ’76, Austin, Dec. 14, 2012 Doris Vinson Moran ’86, Rockport, May 31, 2012 Beth C. Pittman ’92, Cary, N.C., July 11, 2012 Christopher C. Kennel ‘94, San Antonio, Feb. 4, 2013 Jennifer Murphy Martz ‘94, N. Richland Hills, Feb. 28, 2013 Gabe W. Lawson ’98, Midland, Dec. 2, 2012 Wade Tyler “Ty” Wilson ’02, Dallas, Sept. 13, 2012 Bethany Leidlein Deaton ’09, Kansas City, Mo., Oct. 30, 2012 Camille Blackmore Garey, Georgetown, Nov. 9, 2012 Notices received after March 27, 2013, will be listed in the next issue. Kelly Holt, Houston, has created The Austin Phoenix, a quarterly magazine dedicated to the promotion of individual people and local entrepreneurs who are professionally pursuing their passions in life. Other contributors to the Austin-based publication include Marie Franki, Jack Frazee, Sarah Woolley ’09, Allison Noblitt ’10 and John Grimshaw ‘12. Tyler King, The Woodlands, see Jessica Hughes ‘12. Sierra Perez, Austin, is pursuing a master’s degree in science with an emphasis in social work from The University of Texas at Austin. 2012 John Grimshaw, Round Rock, see Kelly Holt ‘11. Jessica Hughes, Austin, has been in a number of theatrical performances including the Hyde Park Theatre production of “Middletown” in Sept. 2012, the Austin Shakespeare Company’s production of “Pride and Prejudice” in Nov. 2012 and a variety of children’s plays with the Pollyanna Theatre Company. Her most recent project was co-directing a play with Tyler King ’11 titled “Austin Is a Place” through Theatre En Bloc. The play discussed all things Austin ranging from the effects of expansion to breakfast tacos. Meagan Moore, Austin, is an AmeriCorps member working in the Keep Austin Housed program as a Housing Specialist Aid. Placed at the Goodwill Career Academy, she works to create housing stability for Travis County residents in financial crisis. None of us is replaceable and we are diminished by any who are absent from us. For the lives of all members of the Southwestern University community who have died, we give thanks. In Memoriam PhotobyLanceHolt 29spring 2013 www.southwestern.edu
  • 30. The day I became a Southwestern student was full of excitement, unknowns and a bit of nervousness. My fellow first years and I filed into the Matriculation Convocation ceremony, gathering together for the first time as the Class of 2013. President Schrum, in his black and gold robe, encouraged and challenged us to “Be Southwestern.” In response to his challenge, we recited in unison, “We commit ourselves to the University as a place and time of personal growth and joint endeavor; to learn and to teach; to discover what is strange and make it our friend…to gain knowledge and passion for lifelong learning as a means of loving the world and its people…” …and during the last four years, that is exactly what happened. The Southwestern Experience is one of relationships and discovery. During my time here, this proud 7th generation Texan fell in love with the world and learned that ‘home’ is relative and ‘family’ is ever growing. Southwestern is “a place and time of personal growth and joint endeavor.” The first moment I walked onto campus as a prospective student, I knew Southwestern was home. It was so real, so genuine. I hit the ground running with a desire to live college life to its fullest, quickly discovering the benefits of Paideia—a unique cross pollination of academic disciplines that allows students to share questions, passions and service in a joint endeavor of self-discovery. And, the value of collaboration with peers and professors became signif- icant as we each charted our individual path. Through study abroad semesters in Freiburg, Germany and Istanbul, Turkey, the opportunity “to discover what is strange and make it my friend” trans- formed my sense of home and community and led me to know that the best souvenir is a friendship. It’s amazing how stepping off an airplane without knowing anyone, deciphering a foreign language, and navigating a new routine can change one’s life. Through constant determination, occasional confu- sion and a lot of smiling, strangers from the corners of the world have become lifelong friends. Ultimately, the lessons I learned, the people I met and the discoveries I made as a student at Southwestern have collectively inspired my “passion for lifelong learning” in the classroom and in the world. I have learned to ask ‘what else?’ and I am ever eager for ‘what’s next.’ I look forward to even more Southwestern-inspired experiences as a grad- uate student in London. After four years of personal growth, learning, teaching and opening my mind to knowledge and passion, I gathered together with my class for the last time at our Commencement ceremony. President Schrum was in the same black and gold robe, but this time we encouraged each other as we all commenced together to the next step in this journey of lifelong learning, friendships and discovery. The Pledge Katherine Tanner ’13 Masters Candidate, Royal Holloway University of London the last word ‘Home’ is relative and ‘family’ is ever growing. 30 Southwestern Magazine
  • 31. Estate planning can be a complex endeavor, but one that can bring great rewards as well. For useful tools and resources, please visit www.southwesterngift.org. If you would like to discuss your options in providing for the future of Southwestern, contact Justin Gould ’98 at 800-960-6363 or justin.gould@southwestern.edu. Every Gift Matters Growing up, we were aware of our parents’ financial commitment to Southwestern University. They established two endowed scholarships: one in the name of their parents, The Bishop-Durst Memorial Fund, and one through a bequest to honor former Southwestern Economics Professor M. L. Williams. I give regularly to Southwestern, have included a bequest in my trust, and urge others to remember the value they received while at Southwestern and to do likewise. — Janet durst sweet nichols ’66 “ Nelson Durst ’36 and Annie Bishop Durst ’36 My dad, Nelson Durst, always spoke of Southwestern University as ‘hallowed ground’.”
  • 32. Class of 2013 Raises the Bar Graduates Kadidiatou Magassa, Austin Painchaud and David Briner present the largest-ever Senior Class Gift in the amount of $111,331.32, representing record class participation of 76 percent. PhotobyLanceHolt