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1WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu
winter 2012
FORWARD THINKING
With an eye to the future, the
University announces bold initiatives.
southwestern university’s core purpose
Fostering a liberal arts community whose values and actions encourage contributions toward the well-being
of humanity.
southwestern university’s core values
Cultivating academic excellence. Promoting lifelong learning and a passion for intellectual and personal
growth. Fostering diverse perspectives. Being true to oneself and others. Respecting the worth and dignity
of persons. Encouraging activism in the pursuit of justice and the common good.
Southwestern University’s recruiting of students, awarding of financial aid, and operation of programs
and facilities are without regard to sex, race, color, religion, age, physical handicap, national or ethnic
origin, or any other impermissible factor. The University’s commitment to equal opportunity includes
nondiscrimination on the basis of sexual orientation.
Southwestern is printed on FSC certified Galerie Art Cover and Text
by TWG Plus, Austin, Texas.
board of trustees
*	Ex-Officio
#	Honorary
Southwestern is published semiannually by the
Office of University Relations. Bulk rate postage
paid at Austin, Texas.
Merriman Morton ’63, Austin, Chair
Larry J. Haynes ’72, Coppell, Vice Chair
R. Griffin Lord, Belton, Secretary-Treasurer
Martin Aleman Jr. ’68, Austin
Mary Delmore Balagia, Dallas
L. James Bankston ’70, Houston
Lisa Barrentine, Allen
Douglas M. Benold ’44, Georgetown
W. Earl Bledsoe*, Plano
Roy H. Cullen#, Houston
John S. Curry ’70, Pampa
James E. Dorff*, San Antonio
Robert W. Dupuy ’69, Dallas
Thomas A. Forbes ’71, Austin
James W. Foster ’72, Houston
Jack Garey, Georgetown
Roberto L. Gómez ’69, San Antonio
Sarah Gould-Stotts ’10, Charlottesville, Va.
Robert H. Graham, Houston
Kay Granger, Fort Worth
Ronald D. Henderson, Plano
Janice Riggle Huie*, Houston
Henry C. Joyner, Colleyville
Robert W. Karr ’71, St. Louis, Mo.
Bart C. Koontz ’78, San Antonio
J. Michael Lowry*, Fort Worth
Red McCombs ’49, San Antonio
Michael McKee, Hurst
J. Eric McKinney ’72, Georgetown
David J. McNitzky ’77, San Antonio
Laura A. Merrill ’84, Harlingen
Charles R. Millikan ’68, Pearland
Barbara Prats Neely ’77, Fort Worth
Ernesto Nieto ’64, Kyle
Steven A. Raben ’63*, Houston
Robert T. Rork ’62, San Antonio
Jake B. Schrum ’68*, Georgetown
Robert C. Scott, San Antonio
Peter A. Sessions ’78, Dallas
Thomas V. Shockley, Georgetown
H. Blake Stanford ’81*, Austin
Stephen G. Tipps, Houston
Donald W. Underwood ’70, Plano
James V. Walzel, Houston
D. Max Whitfield*, Albuquerque, N.M.
Sarah Woolley, ’11, Austin
OFFICE OF Communications
Eric Bumgardner
Creative Director
Kristina W. Moore
Writer/Editor
Antonio Banda
Senior Designer
Cindy Locke
Associate Vice President for University Relations
Ellen Davis
Director of News and Media Relations
John Kotarski ’93
Director of Web Development and Communications
Danielle Stapleton ’05
Associate Director of New Media
magazine@southwestern.edu
OFFICE OF Alumni and Parents
Georgianne Hewett ’90
Associate Vice President for Alumni and Parent Relations
JoAnn Lucero
Associate Director of Alumni and Parent Relations
Grace Josey Pyka ’05
Associate Director of Alumni and Parent Relations
alumni@southwestern.edu
parents@southwestern.edu
chief administrative officers
Jake B. Schrum ’68, President
Richard L. Anderson, Vice President for Fiscal Affairs
Gerald Brody, Vice President for Student Life
James W. Hunt, Provost and Dean of the Faculty
Beverly Jones, University Chaplain
W. Joseph King ’93, Vice President for Innovation
C. Richard McKelvey, Vice President for University Relations
Dave Voskuil, Vice President for Enrollment Services
Francie Schroeder, Executive Assistant to the President
Ronald L. Swain, Senior Advisor to the President for Strategic
Planning and Assessment
Main: (512) 863-6511
Alumni & Parents: (800) 960-6363
Office of Admission: (800) 252-3166
whitley to insert
Share Your Ideas | Make a Gift | Refer a Student
www.southwestern.edu/pride
2 Southwestern Magazine
winter 2011
On the Cover
Renovations to the historic Roy and Lillie Cullen
Building are nearly complete. All 467 of the
building’s windows have been replaced, and
work is in progress to replace the elevator and
reconfigure both the second and third floors for
office and classroom space.
In every issue
		4	 |	 President’s Message
		14	 |	 On Campus
16		|	 Athletics
30	 |	 Engaging Find	
32	 |	 Alumni News
34	 |	 Class Notes
39	 |	 Last Word
Features	
	 6	|	 Going Boldly into the Future: 		
New initiatives look ahead
while preserving our Core
Purpose and Core Values.
	18	|	 Academics In Focus: Broad Strokes
Art History students also learn
the philosophy, religion, history,
politics and class structure
of a time period or culture.
	22	|	 2011 Alumni Awards
Five SU alumni are recognized
for their extraordinary
accomplishments.
28		|	 Behind the Lectern: Big Events
The Brown Symposium, The
Shilling Lecture and The Writer’s
Voice feature big names.
3WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu
 The integration of the
A. Frank Smith, Jr. Library
Center and Information
Technology Services will
allow Southwestern students
additional opportunities
for communication and
collaboration.
n a new book titled The
Innovative University,
Clay Christensen and
Henry Eyring conclude
that traditional colleges
and universities are
going to have to “change their DNA”—and
change it quickly—if they are going to weather
the storms that are threatening institutions of
higher education.
They explain that to survive and thrive in the
new landscape of higher education, schools are
going to have to rewrite the rules of the game.
The winners will be the ones that can success-
fully scale back their spending on luxuries such
as climbing walls, and compete instead to make
students more curious, more committed to a
meaningful cause, more contemplative and more
compassionate.
That’s good news for Southwestern, because
this is our DNA!
In the coming months and years, Southwestern
will change as will much of American higher
education. Our goal is to steward our University
through this change so that we are known as
an innovative, sustainable, relevant and distinc-
tive provider of educational experiences that are
essential to successful and fulfilling lives in the
21st century.
At my annual State of the University address to
faculty and staff in September, I outlined a series
of new initiatives that are designed to help us take
a new path forward. These initiatives include the
possibility of adding several new degree programs
as well as a January Term.
Another initiative will be to integrate the opera-
tions of our A. Frank Smith, Jr. Library Center and
our Office of Information Technology Services
under the leadership of a Chief Information Officer
(CIO). Many of our peer institutions, including
Bryn Mawr, Allegheny, Rhodes, Connecticut
College, Middlebury and Occidental have already
undertaken this step as a way of ensuring that
students and faculty have access to the best infor-
mation possible in this new digital age. A search
committee that includes representatives from
across campus has been appointed to identify the
best possible candidate for the new CIO position.
At the end of October, we announced two other
initiatives that are being made possible by gener-
ous gifts from three of our alumni. We will be
reinstating football in the fall of 2013 and fielding
a new women’s varsity lacrosse team in the spring
of 2014. More details on all of these initiatives can
be found in this issue of the magazine.
None of these initiatives are without contro-
versy, and we have had many lively discussions
on campus since they were unveiled. While
these changes may be hard for some to accept, I
hope members of our community will eventually
support them as a way to ensure a bright future
for the University.
But what is more important than all of these
changes and initiatives is that we continue to
embrace our core purpose: Fostering a liberal
arts community whose values and actions
encourage contributions toward the well-being
of humanity. As James T. Laney, former president
of Emory University once said, “We are created
to serve. If we do not care for something larger
than ourselves and do it with a sense of heart,
then we ourselves shrivel up. Society, the larger
good itself, atrophies. The sense of service and
the sense of ambition are twin aspects of educa-
tion, and that we must take into account. What
it means to be an educated person is not only to
be a mind and to seek one’s own interests, but
also to realize that as one enlarges their range of
interests and serves them, one is fulfilled.”
This is what Southwestern is about.
Jake B. Schrum ’68
President
Our Path Forward
I
4 Southwestern Magazine
president’s message
5WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu
Southwestern Science Center
engaging minds. tr a nsfor ming li v es.
Southwestern’s highest fundraising priority is to create an exemplary undergraduate
science facility, which will foster a cross-disciplinary community and will enhance
Southwestern’s tradition of excellence in science education.
Our plan is to create a new science center to house multiple teaching and research
laboratories, classrooms, offices and multidisciplinary gathering spaces.
To learn more about Southwestern’s planned new science facility, please visit
www.southwestern.edu/giving/sciences
ince its inception, Southwestern has been think-
ing ahead about the way it educates and prepares
future generations. Today, Southwestern continues
to think ahead. Noting a “renewed sense of urgency,”
President Jake B. Schrum ’68 announced at his
September 2011 State of the University address a
series of bold new initiatives designed to help provide
a path forward for the University amidst a continually
changing higher education environment.
Provost and Dean of the Faculty Jim Hunt says Southwestern has a history
of rising to the occasion, but also notes that “we must work diligently to
ensure that our students are getting the educational experience they deserve.”
With the student experience top of mind, the Board of Trustees charged
Schrum with pursuing bold initiatives and putting Southwestern on the path
toward achieving the goals the University community outlined in Shaping
Our Future, The Strategic Plan for 2010–2020. (See Page 7 for a summary.)
“The immediate initiatives and those that are longer-term will all benefit
the students and the institution going forward,” Hunt says.
Sarah Gould-Stotts ’10, a member of the Board, adds, “Southwestern
needs these initiatives to stay competitive in the field of higher education,
to continue providing its students with the highest-quality liberal arts educa-
tion, and to continue making ‘valuable contributions to the well-being of
humanity.’”
leading the way
Rick McKelvey, vice president for university relations, suggests that now
is not the time to be overly reflective, but intentional. “President Schrum,
the senior staff and the Board are fully aware that the hardest work is ahead,
and that there is an urgent need to be intentional about defining and vetting
these bold initiatives with an eye to implementation as soon as possible, in
order to strengthen Southwestern’s position as a leading liberal arts institu-
tion and—most important—to benefit our students.”
1895: The University became a co-educational institution.
1907–09: Southwestern graduated three of the first five
Rhodes Scholars in Texas.
1914: The tradition of inviting contemporary speakers and
artists to campus began.
1949: William C. Finch became president and was later
credited with refining the University’s focus on liberal arts
education.
1981: Roy B. Shilling was elected president, transform-
ing Southwestern from a regional to a national liberal arts
college and making $60 million in campus enhancements
during his tenure.
1994: Southwestern was awarded one of only 280 chapters
of Phi Beta Kappa, which celebrates and advocates excellence
in the liberal arts and sciences.
2000: President Jimmy Carter was the keynote speaker at
the inauguration of President Jake B. Schrum ’68, garnering
the largest crowd ever assembled on campus.
2002: The Paideia®
Program was launched at Southwestern.
2005: Southwestern began offering Living Learning
Communities to strengthen the First Year Seminar program.
S
6 Southwestern Magazine
BOLDSTEPS
for Example...
In addition to the integration of the A. Frank Smith, Jr. Library Center
with the Office of Information Technology Services and the addition of
football and women’s lacrosse, these bold initiatives include the following
three proposals designed to increase revenues and support the University’s
academic mission:
•	 A January Term that will offer students more options for completing their
educational requirements, and faculty more opportunities for teaching.
•	 Working with The Methodist Hospital Research Institute of Houston to
develop a curriculum for a new master’s degree in translational medicine.
Often called “bench to bedside,” translational medicine seeks to quickly
move research findings into medical practices that improve patient care.
•	 The focus of Southwestern’s current Quality Enhancement Plan on the
Paideia®
Program—if approved in 2012 by the Southern Association of
Colleges and Schools (SACS)—will equate to “Paideia for all” and will
help Southwestern recruit students and raise the level of intentionality
for interdisciplinary studies on campus.
There are ongoing conversations about other academic initiatives, includ-
ing a Master of Arts degree in teaching and a possible re-envisioning of the
business program.
While the Board of Trustees has approved the proposals, they will also
require approval through the University’s governance councils and accredi-
tation from the SACS, as well as the Texas Higher Education Coordinating
Board, explains Hunt.
supporting our core
Schrum says, “These initiatives represent a critical path to sustaining our
mission. Every action is being taken to sustain and enhance the Southwestern
Experience—to support the social sciences, the humanities, the natural
sciences and the fine arts that lie at our core.”
Chairman of the Board of Trustees Merriman Morton says of the initia-
tives, “The positive expectations of these initiatives will be that the financial
strength of the University will continue to be strong; there will be contin-
ued focus on academic excellence; the commitment to provide a positive
educational and maturing experience for students will continue; and the
commitment to fulfill our Core Purpose and Core Values will continue.”
7WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu
Shaping Our Future:
The Strategic Plan for Southwestern
University 2010–2020
www.southwestern.edu/plan
Overarching Vision:
Over the next decade, Southwestern University will
continue to position itself as a top-tier, national liberal
arts and sciences college by building upon its greatest
strength—providing a transformational, residential, liberal
arts and sciences education that empowers an increas-
ingly diverse range of students to lead fulfilling lives in a
global community.
Strategic Direction:
Focus on our academic mission—our commitment to
providing every student with an education that extends
beyond the simple transmission of knowledge and skills
to a concept of learning as a broad, integrated and trans-
formational process.
Supporting Strategies:
Enhance Our Campus
Experience and Residence Life
Create a more vibrant, diverse and student-friendly campus
that will enhance the campus experience and the quality of
student life, and will contribute to attracting and retaining
students that are best able to benefit from Southwestern’s
academic mission.
Build Far-Reaching
Visibility and Recognition
Build far-reaching visibility and recognition for the
University as an exceptional national undergraduate liberal
arts and sciences institution known for engaging minds
and transforming lives.
Ensure the Financial Vitality
and Overall Sustainability
of the Institution
Ensure the financial vitality and overall sustainability
of the institution by building an ever-stronger financial
foundation that will increase our ability to invest in our
academic enterprise, undergird our commitments and
reach our aspirations.
the Blueprint
“Southwestern…is one of the few jewels
of the Southwest whose mission is to
prepare a new generation to contribute to
a changing society, and to prosper in their
jobs, whatever and wherever in the world
they may be.”
—Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way
You Think About Colleges (2006–2007 edition)
“It’s not about each entity,” Joey
King ’93, executive director of the
National Institute for Technology
in Liberal Education (NITLE), and
vice president for innovation at
Southwestern, says of the forth-
coming integration of the A. Frank Smith, Jr. Library
Center and the Office of Information Technology
Services. “It’s about the information and infor-
mation services the University can provide to its
constituents.”
Provost Jim Hunt sees the integration as an
“opportunity to strengthen the role of the library
and instructional technology in the academic
program” as well as enhance the campus experi-
ence and the quality of student life as outlined in
the Strategic Plan.
Neither King nor Lynne Brody, dean of library
services at Southwestern, can say specifically how the post-integrated
library will look physically, but they agree that there will most likely be
more space devoted to students in the form of an “information commons”
or “knowledge center” where students may have opportunities ranging from
individual study to group projects and casual conversation to roundtable
discussions. Todd Watson, director of systems and networks, says that this
idea goes hand-in-hand with providing the campus community with the
ability to access as well as discern information. “One of our goals is to teach
students how to be information literate,” he says.
According to King, Southwestern is the latest among its peer institutions
like Occidental, Middlebury and Rhodes, to adopt the “best practice” of
library and ITS integration. As part of the process, Southwestern has begun
a search for a new Chief Information Officer (CIO), who will oversee the
integration and will help the University best take advantage of digital tech-
nology in service to the liberal arts.
King, Brody and Watson are on the search committee for the new CIO
and feel strongly that he or she should have not only a clear vision of infor-
mation technology, but of the pedagogy of the institution as a whole. King
says, “Southwestern will not take a cookie cutter approach.” Watson echoes,
“We’re not trying to reproduce other schools’ models; rather, we want to
customize the program to Southwestern.”
Brody adds that “the new CIO’s ability to understand and articulate the
mission and the liberal arts focus of this institution will allow for the infu-
sion of technology that will enhance rather than change the services we
already provide … Our intent and hope is that our services will improve
through the process, becoming stronger and better for our students, faculty,
staff and other constituents.”
1
Library/ITS Integration
INITIATIVES
“This initiative addresses
the reality that most
students in today’s world
search for information
via the avenues that
technology provides.
Research continues to
reinforce this strategic
direction…as a key
component to move
Southwestern forward as
an institution.”
—Merriman Morton
Chairman of the Board of Trustees
8 Southwestern Magazine
THE
A Richer Learning Experience
In response to the often-asked question, “Will there still be books in
the library?,” the answer is yes. Brody says, “Students will find themselves
having a richer learning experience thanks to new innovations in the way
they are instructed. Characteristic of the Southwestern course experience,
a strong faculty presence and personal interaction will continue, but will
be enhanced by technology.”
Watson’s hope is that there will be an increased focus on technology
and how it can enhance the academic program. He says, “It’s important to
step back and see how both organizations can work together to enhance
the student experience.”
Because information is increasingly available in new ways, Southwestern
has the opportunity to gain access to significantly more information and
resources. King references a recent NITLE pilot study that provided millions
of digital holdings to students who previously had access to virtually none
in their field of study (Chinese, in this case). As a result, students said their
“lives have been changed.” King adds, “The key is that if students, faculty
and others want information, Southwestern will endeavor to provide it, as
well as to have the library staff be as available as they’ve always been or
even more so.”
Some see the integration as a transition that embraces the liberal arts
philosophy of adapting, learning, changing and growing. Brody responds
that “in theory that is true, as long as the core values of a liberal arts educa-
tion—creative thinking, careful reading and analysis of texts—are not lost
or diluted, and as long as we’re careful to maintain a balance by building
on and enhancing our current strengths.”
King, Brody and Watson agree that the focus during the integration should
remain on serving the Southwestern community. Watson says, “We have a
bright future. It’s all about providing students, faculty and staff with access
to the best information and resources available. Brody adds, “I see this as
a positive move that will enhance the services that are already available.”
In a 2007 article published in Reference Sciences Review,1
author Steve McKinzie asks the question, “Can academic
libraries and information technology (IT) services work
together closely?” The answer, he says, is certainly yes.
“They can and have done so since the dawn of automation. …
Even so, in recent years the bond between the two has grown
more intimate. The combination of their shared commitment
to the effective management of information and the library’s
increased dependence on digital resources has brought the
two together.”
The goal for academic institutions, McKinzie explains, should
be “a superb library and IT coordination that serves faculty
and students effectively. … Service and real cooperation
among staff and professionals are the central goals of merged
service organizations. Beyond that, nothing else matters.”
Chris D. Ferguson, who oversees a blended organization as
associate provost for information and technology services
at Pacific Lutheran University, says “The (library/IT) mergers
work best at small colleges.” David W. Dodd, CIO at Xavier
University, who oversaw their recent library/IT integration,
tells his staff, “Go fearlessly into the future.”
1 Steve McKinzie, (2007) “Library and IT mergers: how
successful are they?,” Reference Services Review, Vol. 35
Issue: 3, pp. 340 – 343
9WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu
Graduate in less than four years, add a minor,
study abroad—these are just a few reasons why
Southwestern students would like the option of a
January Term.
	 “The primary reason for considering a January
Term is the potential to provide innovative educa-
tional opportunities for our students,” says Provost
Hunt. Present on many residential liberal arts
campuses (including Southwestern at one time), the
structure of the January Term allows for educational
experiences that may not be available in the fall and
spring semesters. Hunt explains that courses offered
during January Term may provide opportunities for
off-campus learning activities, opportunities for
collaborative efforts between faculty across disci-
plines, and opportunities for students who may need
to complete additional course requirements. In addi-
tion, he says, “Revenue from a January Term would
provide additional resources that the University could
use for its highest priorities, the highest of which is
our Strategic Direction, as laid out in Shaping Our
Future: The Strategic Plan for Southwestern University
2010–2020.”
//JANUARY TERM
2
CompanyIn Good
WANT MORE? For more information about Shaping Our Future, visit www.southwestern.edu/plan
More than 40 percent of all Southwestern applicants
express interest in our science programs and about
one in five students majors in one of the natural
sciences. In addition, Southwestern science students
have research experiences typically available only to
graduate students at larger research universities, and
three quarters of our graduates who have applied to
medical, dental and veterinary school over the past
15 years have been admitted.
These statistics emphasize the importance of our science programs as well
as the opportunities for collaborative research offered to our students with
organizations such as the Welch Foundation’s Summer Scholar Program,
the Texas Life-Sciences Collaboration Center, and—most recently—The
Methodist Hospital Research Institute (TMHRI).
In May 2010, Dr. Charles Millikan ’68, a member of Southwestern’s Board
of Trustees and the vice president for spiritual care and values integration
for The Methodist Hospital System of Houston, invited President Schrum,
Provost Hunt and Professor of Biology Ben Pierce to TMHRI to hear a proposal
for collaboration between Southwestern and the research institute.
“The opportunity to work with TMHRI in Houston is a chance for
Southwestern students to be exposed to world-class scientists, internships
and a possible master’s degree in translational medicine,” explains Vice
President McKelvey. Three Southwestern students had such an opportunity
when they were selected as 2011 summer interns at TMHRI, resulting in an
evolving relationship with one of the leading healthcare systems in the U.S.
Since then, Mauro Ferrari, president and CEO of TMHRI, has suggested
that the relationship between the two institutions could continue in a
number of ways. Recently, Pierce and Associate Professors of Biology Maria
Todd and Maria Cuevas have met with TMHRI representatives to discuss the
possibilities, including that of a master’s degree offered by Southwestern
in collaboration with TMHRI.
While exploring TMHRI’s vision for collaboration with Southwestern, Hunt
explains, “If a master’s program were approved and initiated, it would be
a fifth-year program and would start small with approximately 10 students
per year.”
Translational
medicine is a medical
practice based
on interventional
epidemiology and is
regarded as a natural
progression from
evidence-based medicine.
It integrates research from
the basic sciences, social
sciences and political
sciences with the aim of
optimizing patient care
and preventive measures
which may extend beyond
healthcare services. In
short, it is the process
of turning appropriate
biological discoveries into
drugs and medical devices
that can be used in the
treatment of patients.2
2 http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/05/17/
grove-backs-an-engineers-approach-to-
medicine/?ref=technology “Grove backs an
engineer’s approach to medicine”; New York
Times blog
Collaboration in the Sciences
3
10 Southwestern Magazine
WANT MORE? For more information about the collaboration between Southwestern and TMHRI, visit http://bit.ly/TMHRIv
exploring
Opportunities
For 10 years, the Paideia®
Program at Southwestern has endeav-
ored to transcend conventional approaches to teaching and
learning through a student-driven, faculty-led experience. The
program has promoted connections between academic courses,
offered intercultural and diversity experiences, encouraged civic engage-
ment, and supported collaborative or guided research and creative works.
While approximately 25 percent of Southwestern students have benefited
from these experiences, the University hopes to offer the experience to
an increasing number of students going forward—to ALL Southwestern
students, in fact.
If the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools approves Southwestern’s
proposed Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) in June 2013, implementation
of the faculty development phase of the project will begin the following
academic year, with initial implementation in the fall of 2014. “This is not
a major overhaul,” Provost Hunt says, “but a redesigning of the curriculum
already in place…in effect, it will be ‘Paideia for All.’”
While students typically use the curriculum guidelines of the catalog
under which they entered Southwestern, they may choose instead to adhere
to the guidelines of the most recent catalog. In the “Paideia for All” model,
the First Year Seminar would become an introduction to a topic/theme that
students would then follow throughout their time at Southwestern. Three of
their eight required general education courses would be clustered around
this topic/theme. Professor of Art History and member of the QEP commit-
tee Thomas Howe suggests that the topics/themes might include: chaos
theory, sustainability, global warming, evolution and behavioral sciences,
food culture and health, and more.
The program would culminate with an upper-level seminar or salon,
maintaining the mutual support and challenge of the current faculty-led
Paideia cohorts. Howe says the committee would also like to maintain the
current Paideia aspects of “interdisciplinary critical investigation which
precedes responsible engagement, encouraging habits of lifelong integra-
tive, interdisciplinary discourse and engagement, assisting students as
they develop into public intellectuals who become members of an alert,
informed electorate.”
Hunt says that while professors may need to look at curriculum in a
new way under the redesigned program, students are sure to benefit from
interdisciplinary study through which additional connections are made in
the clustered courses, as well as through civic engagement opportunities
and intercultural experiences.
“From my perspective,
Paideia’s guiding principles
are at the core of a liberal
arts education and this
program empowers
students to make
meaningful connections
between their academic
interests, future goals
and personal passions.
Every Southwestern
student should have an
opportunity to make
those connections
because they are so
integral to maximizing the
Southwestern Experience.”
—Sarah Gould-Stotts ’10
Paideia for All
5
11WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu
SOUTHWESTERN is exploring the viability of institut-
ing a Master of Arts in teaching degree, which would
allow students to receive an undergraduate degree in
a discipline other than education and continue with a
fifth-year master’s program to complete certification.
	 “We’re having an ongoing discussion about this
and alternate options in the Education Department,”
says Provost Hunt, who explains that any changes
to the academic program must first go through the
University’s governance process.
	 Currently, the Education Department offers
students the option to major both in education and
a content field, completing in four years what a
master’s program might offer in five. A four-year dual
major program is competitive with five-year programs
offered by Southwestern’s peer institutions, primarily
serving those seeking secondary teaching certifica-
tion in content fields like mathematics, English and
history. However, some Southwestern graduates
decide late in their academic career to seek teaching
certification and cannot meet all the requirements
in a four-year time frame.
	 In spite of current negative trends in the economy
and in the field of education, Southwestern has
maintained steady growth in teaching graduates.
Hunt and the members of the Education Department
hope to have enough information to make a deci-
sion on whether to move forward or not by the
fall semester.
MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING// 4
Thanks to $6 million in gifts from former
student athletes, Southwestern will rein-
state its football program in fall 2013 and
will create a new women’s varsity lacrosse
team in spring 2014.
As the T-shirts of many Southwestern
students and alumni can attest, Pirate foot-
ball has been “undefeated since 1950.”
That was the year that then President
William C. Finch and the Board of Trustees
reluctantly announced that football would
be dropped from the intercollegiate athlet-
ics program.
First mentioned in the faculty minutes
of Nov. 19, 1895, intercollegiate football officially began at Southwestern
in 1908. The team gained national attention as a powerhouse team under
the leadership of Coach Randolph M. Medley when Southwestern went
9-1 during the 1943–44 season, winning the Sun Bowl in January 1944 and
again the following year.
Sixty years later, Board Chair Merriman Morton says, “Probably no initia-
tive has received more conversation and comment among alumni, students
and faculty than the decision to reinstate football at Southwestern.”
Joe Seeber ’63, a former Southwestern basketball player, and his
wife, Elaine, have pledged $5 million to launch the new programs.
Red McCombs ’49, who played football at Southwestern, and his wife,
Charline ’50, have pledged $1 million. Brent and Joanne Powers Austin ’74
also have made a gift to support the new programs.
“Both Mr. Seeber and Dr. McCombs were varsity athletes at Southwestern
and their generosity is representative of the culmination of their love of
amateur athletics and their commitment to Southwestern,” says President
Schrum.
Adding football and women’s lacrosse will bring Southwestern’s comple-
ment of varsity teams to 20—on par with the University’s peers in the
Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference and the Associated Colleges of
the South. Glada Munt, director of intercollegiate athletics at Southwestern,
says that the addition of both programs is expected to strengthen student
recruiting, with football expected to attract up to 100 male students and
lacrosse to bring in 20 female student-athletes.
Munt also says that, once fully functioning, Southwestern football should
be able to sustain itself financially and should generate a surplus that could
be used for other University priorities like updated facilities, for example.
While home football games will be played at the new Georgetown stadium
complex, the University plans to use land it owns on the east side of campus
to build facilities to support both of the new programs, including two practice
fields, a 15,000 square-foot field house, and a new track to support the track
and cross-country programs. There are also plans to upgrade the existing
locker rooms for field sports in the Corbin J. Robertson Center. These plans
address one of the supporting strategies of the Strategic Plan—enhancing
the financial vitality and overall sustainability of the institution—which
calls on the University to “develop a long-range vision and initiate an East
Campus master plan to enhance our academic enterprise, enrich the lives
of all members of the Southwestern community, and provide a foundation
for the future growth and prosperity of the institution well into the next
century with self-sustaining activities and operations.” 
6“There are many places
you can get an education,
but not many places
transform lives the way
Southwestern does. This
isn’t about football—it’s
about transforming lives.”
—Joe Seeber ’63
12 Southwestern Magazine
Enhancing Athletics
To see a video of Joe Seeber ’63 speaking about his
decision to make a gift to bring back football and
add women’s lacrosse, visit http://bit.ly/sufblax
WANT MORE?
13WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu
Be Southwestern!
Who do you know that may follow in your
(Pirate Bike) tracks?
No, not the living legacy you left in Austin
when you almost got that Captain Ruter tattoo.
Your academic tracks. Like you, the successful
Southwestern student of the future:
	Is highly motivated.
	Looks for intellectual challenges.
	Is civic/community minded.
	Makes learning a top priority.
Got a name or two? Good! Now, go to
www.southwestern.edu/referastudent and
send them our way.
texas’ first u nivers ity
 During the 2010–11 academic
year, 104 Southwestern
University students gave a total
of 3,275 volunteer hours to the
Operation Achievement program.
Operation Achievement, a mentoring program
that Southwestern has run for nearly 25 years in
partnership with the Georgetown Independent
School District, has received a gift from the
Margaret A. Cargill Foundation of Minnesota that
will enable the University to continue offering the
program for at least five more years.
Operation Achievement serves students from
all three Georgetown middle schools. Director
Joni Ragle says the program helps students by
providing them with Southwestern mentors who
serve as positive role models and by teaching
them problem-solving skills.
Operation Achievement is a student-run orga-
nization with six Southwestern students serving
as “staff supervisors” and three who serve as lead
mentors. The entire staff formulates policies and
procedures for the program and plans and imple-
ments all the activities. Three of the staff supervi-
sors serve as liaisons with the middle schools.
Another 50-85 Southwestern students from a
variety of majors serve as mentors in the program
each semester. In 2010–2011, 104 Southwestern
students gave a total of 3,275 volunteer hours to
the program.
Sherry Adrian, associate professor of educa-
tion, says, “Operation Achievement is vital to
our department for the opportunities it provides
to our students, and because it aligns with our
department’s mission of educating and support-
ing students in the public schools.”
Sophomore education major Lindsey Ruther
says, “We aren’t just helping with math problems,
we are changing lives for the better. We are build-
ing relationships with these students that in turn
help with self-confidence, academic success and
peer relations.”
In addition, students participate in a weekly
“enrichment activity.” Science classes have led
hands-on experiments, coaches and athletes have
offered sports clinics, the Music Department has
invited the students to rehearsals, the Theatre
Department has provided tickets for plays, and the
Police Department has taught self-defense classes.
Each semester, the students do a community
service project, and the program culminates each
spring with an “All-Campus Day,” when these
potential future Pirates tour the Southwestern
campus, attend classes with their mentors, eat in
The Commons and see what a college dorm is like.
“We’re thrilled the program will be able to
continue,” says Ragle.
Operation Achievement
Receives Financial Boost
14 Southwestern Magazine
WANT MORE? Go to In Focus at www.southwestern.edu/newsroom
on campus
“We aren’t
just helping
with math
problems, we
are changing
lives for the
better. We
are building
relationships
with these
students that
in turn help
with self-
confidence,
academic
success and
peer relations.”
British Business
Eight Southwestern students who studied
abroad in London last semester—Isaac Bernal,
Sarah Chatfield, Dempsey Jones, Jennifer Juergens,
Veronica Luna, Marlena Serrano, Kamna Tripathi
and Lizette Villarreal—participated in internships
while there.
Maria Kruger, internship coordinator for the
Office of Career Services, explains that students
can express an interest in internships after they
are accepted into the London program and
then the Center for Academic Programs Abroad
arranges several interviews for them when they
get to London.
David Olson, assistant professor and director
of communication studies internships, says that
while it can be difficult to fit an internship into a
class schedule and cultural experiences in a new
city, it is worthwhile because it gives students an
added perspective they might not get as interns
in the U.S.
Tripathi, a junior communication studies
major, interned with Action for Advocacy, a social
justice organization based in England and Wales.
Villarreal, a junior communication studies major,
worked as a marketing intern with INTO Higher,
a network of university-based study centers. She
says, “This internship experience (showed) me
how interconnected the world is, and how all it
takes is a little bit of patience, understanding and
a lot of improvisation to form successful relation-
ships with other cultures.”
In addition, Bernal interned with the Terrence
Higgins Trust fundraising and press teams,
Chatfield interned with Phoenix Futures; Juergens
interned with Shelter England; Luna interned with
Youth Net; Jones interned at three different radio
stations; and Serrano interned with the Royal
Aeronautic Society.
Doing Well at Doing Good
What would you do if you had $3,000 to give
away? That was the challenge facing students in
the new First Year Seminar (FYS) titled “Doing
Good and Doing It Well: The Theory and Practice
of Philanthropy,” taught by Assistant Professor of
History Melissa Byrnes.
“I thought an FYS with a focus on philanthropy
meshed well with our students’ interests and the
University’s core purpose,” Byrnes says. The class
included a broad theoretical discussion of philan-
thropy from multiple disciplinary perspectives,
and included a local, practical project in which
students were asked to solicit grant proposals
from area nonprofits and select one of them to
receive a grant.
The students originally had $1,500 to give to
a deserving local organization, but when Scott
Alarcon from the Georgetown Health Foundation
visited the class, he was so impressed with the
students that he offered to match the amount with
one caveat—the class couldn’t take the easy way
out and divide up the money.
The students received four proposals and then
visited each site. “The opportunity to be part of
a professional group doing a real site visit with
the local organizations was nerve wracking at
first but one of the best things I’ve done here so
far,” said first-year student Angelyn Convertino.
The organization selected to receive the grant
was the Boys & Girls Club of Georgetown, which
is using the money to start a garden to teach the
children it serves about gardening, as well as
about the importance of good nutrition.
“I thought an FYS with a focus on philanthropy
meshed well with our students’ interests and the
University’s core purpose...”
15WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu
BIT OF A STRETCH
“It was something we had already thought would
be a fun thing to do in the future, so we said to
ourselves, ‘well, why not now?’” Erin Cressy says of
the theatre production company that she and fellow
sophomore Emma Martinsen founded in Houston
with their friend Wiley DeWeese, a student at New
York University.
	 Creating Bit of a Stretch Theatre Company turned
out to be not much of a stretch at all. The group’s
first production, Floyd Collins, sold out two of four
performances. Set to do at least one show during
summer 2012, Cressy says, “We can’t do shows while
school is in session … we have to start planning and
reserving spaces and getting rights to shows—it’s
a really long process.”
	 As Bit of a Stretch is meant to be purely nonprofit,
Martinsen, Cressy and DeWeese cover most of the
behind-the-scenes work on their own, including
costumes, lighting design and operation, music,
directing, producing and finances.
	 These skills help in their classes at Southwestern
as well. Cressy and Martinsen are taking their
first directing class, even though they’ve already
directed three plays together. Cressy says, “We’ve
already been practicing the theory but we just didn’t
know it.”
Senior men’s soccer player Alex Keller and
senior swimmer Sarah Ayers were the 2011 recipi-
ents of the esteemed Dr. Tex Kassen and Dr. Carla
Lowry Athlete-of-the-Year Awards.
Keller, a midfielder from Houston, led the
Pirates in goals, assists and points in 2011. One
of the team captains, he started in 18 of the 19
contests in which he competed, scoring nine
goals—two game winners—and assisting nine
times for a total of 27 points, making him the
fifth highest point getter in the SCAC.
For his outstanding play, Keller was an SCAC
Player-of-the-Week, as well as All-SCAC First Team
and NSCAA All-West Region Second Team. He led
the Pirates in every way imaginable as evidenced
by his selection to the SCAC All-Sportsmanship
Team and SCAC Fall 2010 Student-Athlete
Academic Honor Roll.
“Not only was AK one of the most dynamic
forwards in the conference, but he was also one of
the classiest individuals to compete at any level,”
says Head Men’s Soccer Coach Don Gregory. “It is
an honor to say that AK made a massive imprint
on our program with his friendly personality and
outstanding character.”
Ayers, also from Houston, exploded in the
pool during the 2010–11 Pirate swim season. She
was the SCAC Event Champion in the 100 back
and earned an NCAA “A” Cut qualification and
All-SCAC Team pick. Representing Southwestern
at the NCAA Championships, Ayers came in
seventh place in the 100 back event, earning
Southwestern’s first-ever All-America honors in
swimming.
While serving as the team captain, Ayers was
named SCAC Swimmer-of-the-Week and is the
current record holder in the 100 back, 100 fly, and
400 free relay. She was also selected to the CoSIDA
Academic All-District team for her outstanding
work in the classroom.
“This award truly exhibits Sarah’s talents
and abilities that have enabled her to achieve
success athletically and academically,” says Former
Assistant Men’s and Women’s Swimming Coach
Sarah Woodbury. “She is a strong leader and has
been a vital part of the team’s success.”
Kassen and Lowry are former Southwestern
Directors of Athletics who expected excellence
from all who wore the Southwestern uniform.
They were advocates for all student-athletes and
had great respect for those who worked hard,
were exceptional performers and exemplified
great sportsmanship.
Keller and Ayers were honored and received
their awards at their respective sporting events
during the 2011–12 academic year.
Keller, Ayers Named
2011 Athletes of the Year
Ayers photo by Shelley Dormont ’11
16 Southwestern Magazine
pirate athletics
World-renowned distance runner and five-time
Olympian Francie Larrieu Smith (above, center) has
been Southwestern’s head cross country and track and field
coach for 13 seasons.
	 She recently returned from her duties as an assistant track
and field coach for the 2011 Pan American Games, held in October
in Guadalajara, Mexico. “This type of coaching was never my
goal, but it’s been fun and rewarding,” she says. The Pan Am
Games opportunity was Smith’s third international coaching
experience. “This time was different,” she says, “because it
was track and field (rather than cross country) and track and
field is my thing!”
	 She says she especially enjoyed helping the athletes negoti-
ate the starting line and call room process. “I was able to help
because I’ve been there,” she says, “and I know it can be nerve
wracking.”
	 During the course of her 30-year career, Smith established
36 U.S. records and 12 world bests in distances ranging from
1,000 to 10,000 meters. She was selected by Runner’s World
magazine as “The Most Versatile Runner of the Quarter Century.”
As an Olympian, she had her best finish in 1988 with a fifth place
finish in the 10,000 meters at Seoul, South Korea. As a crowning
achievement, she was the flag bearer for the U.S. Olympic Team
in Barcelona, Spain (1992).
	 Smith holds a Master of Education degree in sports admin-
istration from The University of Texas at Austin. During her
tenure at Southwestern, she has taken two athletes to the
NCAA Cross Country Championships and has coached athletes
to South/Southeast Region honors 17 times and All-SCAC honors
16 times. In track and field, she has coached two athletes and
three relay teams to SCAC Championship titles and 24 athletes
to All-SCAC honors.
Hit the Switch // Thanks
to a generous anonymous gift, Southwestern’s
soccer and lacrosse programs are embarking on
a new era of competition at Southwestern—night
games. New lights for the soccer/lacrosse field,
a pedestrian walkway and a parking lot were
installed this fall. A dedication ceremony was
held on October 21, when the Pirates took on
SCAC Conference opponent, Hendrix College.
The new lights will allow the teams to practice
and compete on the field later into the evening,
reducing the amount of class time missed by
student-athletes. Night games will also improve
the fan experience for students and community
members, and elevate the competition environ-
ment for Pirate athletes. However, Glada Munt,
associate vice president and director of intercol-
legiate athletics, notes that the new lights will be
used judiciously to stay in line with Southwestern’s
energy conservation and green initiatives.
“This addition will take the (soccer) program to
an even higher level as the night venue will be a
significant boost to recruiting and to student and
fan attendance,” said Coach Gregory. “It has been
a dream for quite a while to play under the lights,
and now ‘hitting the switch’ will be a reality.”
An additional gift from a former Southwestern
athlete provided funds to run a fiber optic cable to
the field. This will allow the University to broad-
cast the games live online.
Arrrr! PIRATEDATA
17WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu
2,520rolls of tape the
athletic training
staff uses
throughout
the year.
1,080gallons of
Gatorade
consumed
annually.
1,750baseballs the
Pirates use in one
season.
$224average cost
of a team
meal (including
coaches, trainers
and managers)
for the men’s
lacrosse team.
3holes-in-one during
competition under
Coach Dan Ruyle
(Kristen Davenport ’09;
Ben Thompson ’05;
Robert Kneisley ’06)
Go to www.southwesternpirates.com
for scores, stats and additional information
about Pirate Athletics.
WANT MORE?
18 Southwestern Magazine
academics in focus
academicsinfocus
“Through art, we discover the economic condi-
tion, the political messages, and the religious
traditions of the day.”
Including Howe, Southwestern’s Art History
Program includes four full-time faculty members—
two from Harvard University, one from Yale
University and one from the University of Chicago.
“We are intentional about building diversity into
the curriculum. We want our students to be able
to reflect and think critically as they interact
with research,” says Kimberly Smith, associate
professor of art history, specializing in modern
(European) art.
Though the department is small, it is 50-50
Western and non-Western in the fields the faculty
cover. This is very unusual in any department;
thus, the program is well equipped to prepare
students for international careers in the world in
which this generation of students will live. All
four faculty work internationally and are fluent
in the language and culture of the countries in
which they work: Smith in Germany/Austria,
Patrick Hajovsky in Central and South America,
Allison Miller in China, and Howe in Italy, where
he leads a large archaeological and arts manage-
ment project near Pompeii.*
“We all feel responsible to give students a global
introduction to art history,” adds Hajovsky, associ-
ate professor of art history, whose focus is Latin
American art and who is currently researching
and writing a book on Montezuma, within an
Aztec context.
Miller, assistant professor of art history, is the
newest member of the department. She says,
“Art history is an anchor for studying history in
“Prior to innovation, one needs a huge depth of
knowledge.” —Thomas Noble Howe
he study of art history
at Southwestern exposes students
to high-quality historical and expe-
riential learning, all framed by the
perspective of a broader liberal arts
education.
The art history major consists of six broad
areas of study—East Asian, Latin American, pre-
modern (classical and medieval), early modern
(renaissance and baroque), modern and design
history—and is a scholarly discipline that enables
students to develop visual literacy and critically
assess the complex meanings of material culture
within diverse settings.
Thomas Howe, professor of art and art history
and holder of the Herman Brown Chair, says
that art history in particular is a rigorous and
demanding degree program at Southwestern.
“Our students become visually literate, learn to
speak rationally about the irrational and to back
up their assertions with research and evidence.”
He adds, “We teach that art can and often
should be considered using a broad, contextual
approach.” By studying art objects in relation to
contemporaneous political and historical events,
students may learn about the philosophy, religion,
history, politics, class structure and more of the
time period.
By studying the aesthetics, one learns that
objects, works, images and architecture are tied
in intricate ways to the culture. Howe explains,
 Assistant Professor of Art
History Allison Miller leads
students in the examination
of an East Asian handscroll
facsimile.
photos by Shelley Dormont ’11
19WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu
The rigorous and demanding Art History major at Southwestern
academicsinfocus
environment.” For those who choose a career
path other than in the arts, experience shows
that they still carry their love of and knowledge
about art with them.
TODAY’S WORLD
Howe goes on to discuss the future of research
in a small, liberal arts school like Southwestern,
explaining, “In the ‘Flat World’ of Thomas
Friedman**, technology allows both faculty and
students to work at an ambitious international
level, which I foresee leading to an evolution of
researchers heading to smaller colleges … espe-
cially those who enjoy teaching at the undergradu-
ate level as we do.”
Working nationally and internationally allows
faculty to help students with networking opportu-
nities both in the U.S. and abroad. Many art history
students—about one half to three fourths—study
abroad as part of their Southwestern Experience. In
summer 2010, now senior Georgia LoSchiavo and
Katherine Maples ’10 traveled to Italy with Howe
to work on an ancient garden.
More than 2,000 years old and possibly the
largest well-preserved formal garden ever found,
the garden was located in the ancient Roman city
of Stabiae that was buried with the eruption of
Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79. Howe has been leading
excavations at Stabiae since 1999.
general … art makes history come alive!” Fluent
in Mandarin Chinese, Japanese and Latin, Miller’s
specialty is East Asian art. She says she enjoys
observing her students as they discover that East
Asian art is “more than Mulan.”
The art history major offers excellent prepara-
tion for any field requiring critical thinking, broad
cultural knowledge, and research and writing
skills. In addition to preparing students for Master
of Arts and Ph.D. programs in art history, it is an
appropriate major for work in other areas of the
visual arts or in other academic disciplines like
history or philosophy. Howe says, “Art history
is also great preparation for fields such as law,
business or medicine.”
Senior art history major Kelly Johnson adds,
“Studying art history provides the opportunity
to learn a little bit about everything. Because art
engages with culture throughout history in so
many different ways, the discipline has the poten-
tial to tap into theory, science, politics, identity,
religion, technology and on and on.”
Because the current generation of students will
most likely change careers three or four times,
Howe says, “One of the most important things
about a liberal arts education is that it allows you
to change direction, taking your previous training
into your next … no one will be better prepared
than a student who is educated in a liberal arts
 Professor of Art History
Thomas Howe says it is
important for faculty to care
for students while giving them
more and more independence.
20 Southwestern Magazine
academicsinfocus
Here in the U.S., one of the most successful
off-campus opportunities for Southwestern
students, according to Howe, has been the New
York Arts Program, a full-semester, full-credit
program, which introduces students to the world
of established art and media professionals and
organizations in New York City. Southwestern
participants have been accepted to internships
with such prestigious organizations as Sotheby’s,
the Metropolitan Museum, Carnegie Hall and
Rockefeller Center, where they begin network-
ing for their future careers. Johnson, for example,
participated in the program and interned at the
Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art at
the Brooklyn Museum and the Whitney Museum
of American Art. She says of the experience, “my
education definitely prepared me for the working
art world.”
A number of Southwestern art history majors
have found positions in the area of cultural
management, for which they are well-prepared,
thanks to their ability to learn a foreign language,
their understanding of culture and history, and
their ability to write and communicate well and
to recognize important issues.
One such alumnus, Albert Bui ’06, went on
to earn a Master of Industrial Design degree at
the Rhode Island School of Design. He has since
worked for DMX, an environmental branding
company in Austin, and for Berlin Cameron
United, a creative advertising agency in New York.
He currently freelances as a branding strategist
for small, start-up companies.
Other alumni have found positions such as assis-
tant to the creative director for Vogue magazine;
chief registrar and manager of collections for
West Point Museum, tenure-track professor at
Susquehanna University, and post-doctoral fellow
for the Center for World Heritage Research at the
University of Florida.
FACULTY ROLE
Howe explains that the art world is a difficult
one to break into. “We (the Southwestern art
history faculty) are gatekeepers to that world.
It may seem harsh at times, but it is our job to
prepare our students for that intense but privi-
leged world. We care for our students, but feel
strongly that it is important to give them more
and more independence and ‘push them out of
the nest’ so they are ready for that world.”
Alumni like Bui agree that they were very well
prepared at Southwestern. “The transition from
Southwestern to graduate work was almost seam-
less,” Bui says. “My writing abilities were quite
strong compared to my peers and I was able to
flush out large passages of critical text with confi-
dence.” Even as a student, Johnson also agrees.
She says, “I’m considering pursuing a career as
a museum curator, but wherever I end up after
graduation, I can use my critical thinking and
writing skills developed (at Southwestern) in
any job situation.”
Bui adds that he owes much of his design
editing eye to Howe, as well as Professor of Art
Patrick Veerkamp. “Thanks to them, my ability
to read emotional symbolism from visual and
physical form is priceless and I incorporate this
skill into every moment of my design work.”
He advises current students to “Be fearless!
Keep your eyes open and trust your point of view
… observations of the world—especially human—
will come in handy and you’ll get paid for it!”
* With an international reputation as an architectural historian
(ancient and modern), architectural design teacher, archaeologist
(Greek and Roman), art historian (Greek, Roman, post-Modern)
and cultural properties manager of “archaeological parks,”
Howe has, for the past decade, been coordinator general of
the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation near Pompeii, Italy,
serving as chief coordinator of archaeology and architectural
planning. (Visit http://www.stabiae.com/fountation_site/usa/
index.html for more information.)
** Thomas Friedman was Southwestern’s 2012 Shilling Lecturer.
(See Page 29 or visit www.southwestern.edu/about/shilling for
more information.)
“Art history is
an anchor for
studying history
in general … art
makes history
come alive!”
21WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu
Each year, a committee
of Southwestern alumni
collects recommendations
from the SU community
and selects a number
of their peers to receive
annual Alumni Awards. The
Association of Southwestern
University Alumni hosts an
awards presentation during
Homecoming and Reunion
Weekend. Colleagues, friends
and family members contribute
to the citations that are read
to the recipients during the
presentation.
portraits by Lance Holt
alumni
awards
Southwestern
2011
22 Southwestern Magazine
For her dedication to those in need, for her
commitment to personal values that serve to help
others, and for her ability to restore the term
“politician” to its best definition—one who serves
the public—The Association of Southwestern
University Alumni proudly presented Joan with
the 2011 Distinguished Humanitarian Award.
Joan Bray ’67
Distinguished Humanitarian Award
The Distinguished Humanitarian Award is presented to
alumni who have made a global impact on the human
race by their actions while exemplifying Southwestern
University’s Core Purpose, which encourages “contribut-
ing to the well-being of humanity.”
“Most everything Joan Bray does has the well-
being of humanity at its core,” say her friends
and colleagues.
A champion in the effort to elect more women
to public office, Joan established herself as a
formidable player in the Missouri State House
of Representatives. Subsequently elected to the
Missouri State Senate, she continued her advocacy
for those in need on a local, statewide and even
national level.
Joan is known for practicing what she preaches
and “walking the talk,” particularly in the area of
public transportation. So dedicated to the cause,
a fellow senator gave her the nickname “Iron
Wheels.”
With a reputation as a no-nonsense, fiscally
conservative Democrat, Joan is known for her
willingness to represent her values in a some-
times hostile political environment, unafraid to
defy the majority if need be. As an outspoken
legislator, she dedicated her life’s work to human
rights and equality.
The words humble, warm and caring have
been used to describe Joan’s character, as well
as driven, high-energy and laser-focused. Many
colleagues have a strong respect for Joan’s views,
even when they are in opposition to their own.
She is admired for her tireless years of advocacy,
diplomacy and leadership, as well as for her gift
of seeing both the big picture and the details of
an issue, and her ability to confront brutal facts
with compassion and honesty.
Joan’s commitment to the truth and respect for
all has enabled her to work with colleagues across
the aisle to accomplish her priorities. Colleagues
consider her to be helpful, reliable and someone
who can be counted on to represent her constitu-
ents to the best of her ability. Widely regarded
as a competent, principled and effective Senator,
Joan has been a role model and mentor to many.
“Joan’s commitment to the
truth and respect for all has
enabled her to work with
colleagues across the aisle
to accomplish her priorities.”
23WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu
WANT MORE? For more information about The Association of Southwestern University Alumni, visit www.sualumni.net
he became Medical Director of Angelo Clinic
Association and then Medical Director of Shannon
Health System.
Dan genuinely cares about others and always
focuses on helping patients have healthy, happy,
productive lives. Over the years, he began assum-
ing leadership roles and, because he also cares
about issues facing the community and the
country, chose to pursue a business degree from
the University of North Carolina. He became Chief
Medical Officer and then CEO of Shannon Health
System prior to his appointment to the THA.
In the five years since taking the helm at the
THA, Dan has influenced state and federal health
care policy, developed a strong public educa-
tion program regarding the need for health care
reform, established a hospital physician executives
program, and served on the American Hospital
Association Regional Policy Board.
With a long-standing connection to
Southwestern—his uncle, Durwood Fleming, was
Southwestern’s 12th president—Dan has recently
become Vice Chair of the newly formed Science
Center Advisory Council and a member of the
University’s Board of Visitors.
Energetic, optimistic, compassionate, creative,
diligent and trustworthy, Dan is known to be
a leader and an inspiration to others, includ-
ing his wife, Alice Schorre Stultz ’72, whom he
met at Southwestern, his three children, John,
James and Lisa Stultz-Bleakley ’98, and his five
grandchildren.
For his interest in others both profession-
ally and personally, for his willingness to take
responsibility for his actions while considering
the views of others, and for being a great example
of the Southwestern Experience, The Association of
Southwestern University Alumni presented Dan
with the 2011 Distinguished Professional Award.
Dan Stultz ’72
Distinguished Professional Award
The Distinguished Professional Award is presented to
Southwestern alumni who have performed exceptional
civic and/or professional services in a given geographic
area or field of endeavor. Recipients represent the highest
standards and exemplify the University’s Core Values.
As a practicing physician for 28 years and now
the President and CEO of the 475-member Texas
Hospital Association (THA), Dr. Dan Stultz is a life-
long learner and a shining example of the liberal
arts experience.
Friends agree that he is the “whole package”
both personally and professionally, and that his
Southwestern Experience as an athlete and pre-med
student was integral to preparing him for success
in both medicine and business.
After graduating from Southwestern, Dan went
on to The University of Texas Medical School
in Houston and completed his residency at the
University of Kentucky. His career in internal
medicine began in 1978 in San Angelo, where
“Energetic, optimistic,
compassionate, creative,
diligent and trustworthy,
Dan is known to be a leader
and an inspiration to others.”
24 Southwestern Magazine
Marjorie Stripling Schultz ’70
Distinguished Southwestern
Service Award
The Distinguished Southwestern Service Award is
presented to an alumna/us who serves the University
over a long period of time; serves his or her community,
state and nation, and is a leader in his or her chosen
profession, business or vocation.
As one of four sisters who attended
Southwestern, as well as the wife of an alumnus
—Al Schultz ’71—it is not surprising that
Southwestern has had an enduring presence in
the life of Marjorie Stripling Shultz. But, she has
also had an enduring presence and influence in
the life of Southwestern.
Over the years, Marjorie has “Been
Southwestern” as a member of the Development
Committee and the Campaign Cabinet, as well
as an Alumni Board Officer and a member of
the Board of Trustees. In addition, her service
to Southwestern has included being a member
of both the Brown Society and the 1840 Society.
A partner in the Houston law firm that bears her
name, Marjorie is board certified in estate planning
and probate law, and is the long-standing Chair
of the Planned Giving Council. She and Al have
shown their support and love of Southwestern by
funding several annual scholarships.
She has also worked for the past decade as
pro bono counsel for the University’s Office of
Planned Giving to help advance Southwestern’s
mission. Always thoughtful and interested in
the people with whom she speaks, Marjorie has
provided professional services of the highest
caliber and has shared her wisdom and talents
with the alumni and friends interested in naming
the University as a beneficiary in their estate plans.
President Jake B. Schrum ’68 says, “As an expert
estate attorney, Marjorie has continuously been
willing to share her professional experience with
alumni and friends of Southwestern, helping the
University become the beneficiary of significant
commitments. In the simplest terms, Marjorie
facilitates our ability to provide the Southwestern
Experience to future generations.”
Respected for her legal prowess and invalu-
able counsel to the University as a whole and to
individual donors, Marjorie is also appreciated for
her straightforwardness and generosity, which
goes beyond simply writing a check, to support-
ing a cause or an organization about which she
cares deeply.
It is for her commitment to those with whom
she works, for her extraordinary energy and forth-
rightness in all areas, as well as for her devotion
and service to the University, that The Association
of Southwestern University Alumni proudly
presented Marjorie with the 2011 Distinguished
Southwestern Service Award.
“Always thoughtful and
interested in the people with
whom she speaks, Marjorie
provides professional
services of the highest
caliber.”
25WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu
Friends and colleagues say that Sylvia’s intelli-
gence, energy, vibrancy, charisma, grace and poise
are continuously growing and thriving … and that
there is nothing she can’t achieve. In fact, in the
10 years since graduating from Southwestern,
Sylvia has already had an active career in the areas
of sales, communications, research, marketing,
project management, instructional design, public
affairs, fundraising and grassroots advocacy.
As a student, Sylvia worked tirelessly to promote
the common good of the student body and always
stood up for what was right. She and her class-
mates also helped revive the “spirit” of the late
J. Samuel Barcus, Class of 1890, who served as
Southwestern’s first alumnus president from
1924–1928. Thanks to Sylvia, Barcus now has
the opportunity to make late night visits to the
library and guest appearances at SING!
Continuing her service to Southwestern as
an alumna, Sylvia has been an Annual Giving
Board Member, a member of both her 5- and
10-Year Reunion Planning Committees, and the
Communications Chair of the Greater Georgetown
Association of Southwestern Alumni.
Because of her work ethic and positive atti-
tude, Sylvia stands out in a crowd. With a sense
of fairness and constant thirst for the truth, Sylvia
is never one to say “Don’t confuse me with the
facts.”
Prior to her current professional position as
Technical Trainer with Harte-Hanks, she was the
Coalitions Director for the Texans for Kay Bailey
Hutchison organization. Senator Hutchison has
said, “Sylvia’s time at Southwestern has had a
profound influence on shaping the committed,
dedicated person she is today.”
For her strength and conviction, for her enthusi-
astic and positive attitude, and for always thinking
of others first, The Association of Southwestern
University Alumni presented Sylvia with the 2011
Distinguished Young Alumna Award.
Sylvia Mayer, ’01
Distinguished Young
Alumna Award
The Distinguished Young Alumna Award is presented
to Southwestern University students who have gradu-
ated in the last 10 years and whose achievements in
the civic and/or professional realm set a standard of
excellence. Recipients represent Southwestern’s finest
young alumni and the University’s commitment to a
values-centered curriculum and development of the
whole person.
When Sylvia Mayer enters a room, every one
knows it!
Described as a beacon of light, Sylvia has long
worked to support others and encourage them to
have a positive outlook, and is known for being
motivated not by accolades or awards, but solely
by what she stands for.
“As a student, Sylvia worked
tirelessly to promote the
common good of the
student body and always
stood up for what was right.”
26 Southwestern Magazine
Pamela Gregory Rossman, ’72
Ms. Homecoming Award
The Mr./Ms. Homecoming Award is an honor bestowed
upon a member of the Southwestern University faculty
as a token of the affection and respect of former students.
The award carries special meaning to the recipient, as
it symbolizes the strength of the University: the strong,
personal relationships between students and faculty,
clearly indicating that alumni recall with apprecia-
tion the contributions of the recipient to the students’
education and development.
In her 28 years of service to Southwestern,
Pam Rossman has taught piano, accompanied
the University Chorale, and has been the Chapel
Organist and its Music Coordinator. Pam’s
colleagues say that she helps make their jobs
“pure joy.”
Described as kind, generous, gifted and
caring, friends and fellow alumni agree that
Pam’s undying support of Southwestern, along
with her quiet confidence and integrity, make
her a wonderful example of teachers who make
a difference.
While a student at Southwestern, Pam met and
later married Mike Rossman ’73, Southwestern’s
director of admission. Mike describes Pam as
loving, committed, spiritual and passionate
about music and says that she carries the mark
of Southwestern teachers like Drusilla Huffmaster
Anderson and others who came before her.
Pam has always understood the power of music
to impact people. Using her love of classical music
to express her spirituality, Pam plays the organ
in a way that has brought many people both to
tears and to levels of great joy, all with a sense of
reverence. She is also able to identify and call forth
students whose musical gifts, used in a public
way, contribute to the lifting of others’ spirits.
Pam’s belief that good music is worth the effort
it takes to perform is proven by her rigorous prac-
tice routine. But she’s not all music all the time.
She also enjoys drinking her coffee and water-
ing her flowers in the morning—when the water
levels at Lake Georgetown allow it—as well as
her three crazy dachshunds, who allow Pam and
Mike to share their home.
For her commitment to uplifting the
Southwestern community and to making a differ-
ence in the lives of so many people in such a
profound and memorable and musical way, The
Association of Southwestern University Alumni
presented Pam with its highest honor bestowed
upon faculty, the 2011 Ms. Homecoming Award.
“Described as kind, generous, gifted
and caring, friends and fellow alumni
agree that Pam is a wonderful example
of teachers who make a difference.”
27WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu
The 34th annual
Brown Symposium,
Back to the Foodture:
Sustainable Strategies
to Reverse a Global
Crisis, was held on
Southwestern’s campus
Feb. 27–28, 2012.
Developed by Laura
Hobgood-Oster, profes-
sor of religion, the
Symposium’s topic was
food—a celebration of food culture. “Bountiful
food is celebration, creative food is art, particular
foods mark cultures, lack of food is deadly. Food
is so central to who and what we are that we, too
often, take it for granted. But many humans are
not afforded this luxury,” she says.
“Now, we find ourselves at the brink of a poten-
tial crisis. A growing human population coupled
with food production practices that are potentially
devastating for the environment, other animals
and human health (factory farming, monoculture,
intensive agriculture) threaten life in many forms
—both human life and entire ecosystems.”
This year’s Brown Symposium considered food
from many angles and pondered ways we can
rethink our relationship with this most basic,
beautiful and complex of needs.
Featured speakers included: Richard Wilk,
Indiana University; Winona LaDuke, Honor
the Earth; Amie Breeze Harper, University of
California, Davis; Wayne Pacelle, Humane Society
of the United States; and Jo Luck, Heifer Project
International.
Hobgood-Oster explains that Symposium partic-
ipants learned that there are differences in food
culture around the world. The food culture in the
U.S. is “unsustainable and unhealthy, and now
we’re exporting this culture.” She says this is not
something to fear, but to be aware of. “We need
to sustain appropriate food cultures and, unfor-
tunately, agriculture is the enemy of biodiversity.”
Participants also learned about new ways of
producing all kinds of food which are better for
humans, animals and the environment, and that
the healthiest diets in the world (Mediterranean,
SE Asian) don’t consist of all the same foods, but
include a wide variety of local foods.
As part of the Symposium, Patrick Veerkamp,
professor of art, co-curated an art exhibit titled
“Culinary Cultures: A Ceramics Perspective.” In
addition, Bruce Cain and David Asbury, associate
and assistant professors of music respectfully,
performed a concert titled “River of Words,”
featuring a special piece commissioned for the
Symposium.
There was also a farmer’s market and a canned
food drive. Hobgood-Oster encouraged partici-
pants to read the labels and be thoughtful about
the foods they donated.
The Brown Symposium is presented by
Southwestern University on an annual basis. Open
to the public without charge, the Symposium
is funded through an endowment established
by The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston for
professorships at the University.
Brown Symposium Goes
Back to the Foodture
Illustration by Nick Ramos
28 Southwestern Magazine
behind the lectern
Dave Eggers, author of six books and the
founder of and editor for McSweeney’s, an inde-
pendent publishing house based in San Francisco,
was the 2011 visiting author in The Writer’s
Voice Series sponsored by the A. Frank Smith, Jr.
Library Center.
Eggers’ best-selling book, A Heartbreaking Work
of Staggering Genius, was a finalist for the Pulitzer
Prize for General Non-Fiction. His 2006 novel,
What is the What, won the 2009 Prix Médicis for
best foreign work of fiction and was a finalist for
the National Book Critics Award for Fiction. His
most recent work, Zeitoun, is a nonfiction account
of a Syrian-American immigrant and his extraor-
dinary experience during Hurricane Katrina.
Eggers spoke on November 1 to students,
faculty, staff and the public in a full-to-capacity
Alma Thomas Theater. In reaction, sophomore
Jacob Brown said, “Eggers is a perfect fit for
Southwestern. He not only stands for lifelong
learning in his range of interests … but he’s also
dedicated to civic duty—changing the world for
the better.”
Discussing his writing as well as his passion for
helping others, Eggers specifically shared his expe-
rience with 826 Valencia, a nonprofit writing and
	 More than 2,000 gathered to hear the 2012 Shilling
Lecture speaker, Thomas Friedman, foreign affairs
columnist for The New York Times.
	 Friedman has won three Pulitzer Prizes, and
according to Foreign Policy magazine, “Friedman
doesn’t just report on events; he helps shape them.”
Vanity Fair called him “the country’s best newspaper
columnist,” and he has been named one of “America’s
Best Leaders” by U.S. News & World Report.
	 Friedman’s most recent book, That Used to Be Us:
How America Fell Behind in the World We Invented
and How We Can Come Back is about the major
challenges facing the U.S., the reason the country is
not addressing those challenges effectively, and the
policies America needs to adopt to ensure prosperity
at home and strength abroad in the 21st century.
	 His book Hot, Flat and Crowded: Why We Need a
Green Revolution — and How It Can Renew America,
was a #1 New York Times bestseller, and his previous
bestseller, The World is Flat, has sold more than four
million copies. Other bestselling books by Friedman
include Longitudes and Attitudes: The World in the
Age of Terrorism, The Lexus and the Olive Tree and
From Beirut to Jerusalem, which serves as a basic
text on the Middle East in colleges and universities
nationwide and won the National Book Award.
	 The Roy and Margaret Shilling Lecture Series,
endowed in 1999 by The Brown Foundation, Inc., of
Houston, to honor Southwestern’s 13th president,
Roy B. Shilling Jr., and his wife, Margaret, brings to
campus internationally prominent speakers on topics
relating to ethics, public service and public policy.
The 2012 lecture was sponsored in part by Sodexo.
	 Emi Anderson, Class of 2013, said “As a political
science major, having Thomas Friedman come to
speak was one of the most exciting things that could
happen. Whether you agree with his viewpoints or
not, being engaged in the ... discussion is a valuable
experience.”
That Used to Be Us...
The Shilling Lecture welcomed New York Times foreign affairs columnist and Pulitzer Prize winner Thomas Friedman
Eggers Promotes Storytelling, Giving Back
tutoring center for youth in the Mission District of
San Francisco, which he co-founded in 2002 with
Nínive Calegari. Local communities have since
opened sister 826 centers in Chicago, Los Angeles,
Brooklyn, Ann Arbor, Seattle, Washington, D.C.
and Boston.
For his work, Eggers received the 2007 Heinz
Award in the Arts and Humanities, was named
in 2010 to Poets and Writers magazine’s list of
the “Fifty Most Inspiring Authors in the World,”
and was one of the winners of the 31st annual
American Book Awards, given for literary works
that cover “the entire spectrum of America’s
diverse literary community.”
29WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu
This is a story of the American dream and the
dark currents that threaten to drown it in a mili-
tarized and extra-legal America after 9/11.
Zeitoun illuminates the experience of the 2005
flood that followed Hurricane Katrina in New
Orleans in a way that takes us far from the scenes
of devastation in the Lower Ninth Ward and chaos
in the convention center. In this book, we see
the flood through the eyes of a successful small-
business owner, Abdulrahman Zeitoun, a Syrian
immigrant paddling through the city in his canoe
trying to help his neighbors while his American-
born wife, Kathy, and their children worry about
him from safe havens inland. They worry even
more when he seems to disappear without a trace
as he finds himself incarcerated with no access
to lawyers, courts or phones. That anyone had
such experiences—not to mention that tens of
thousands of poor people were simply abandoned
to the storm and flood—is deeply unnerving to
those of us who want to believe that our country
is decisively different from say, authoritarian Syria.
At first, Dave Eggers’ tale of Zeitoun in the flood
seems like a grand adventure. When the storm
waters first recede, then begin to rise rapidly
around his house (bringing the realization that
some levees must have failed), Zeitoun takes
charge of his situation, camping out on the roof
of his garage and feeding neighbors’ dogs. As he
begins to paddle around his neighborhood in his
canoe, his quiet approach enables him to hear the
distress cries of trapped neighbors and rescue
them, even as military parties speed by in fan
boats, hearing nothing and stopping for nothing.
But then this romantic tale takes a darkly tragic
turn. Zeitoun, a Syrian friend, a tenant and another
Zeitoun
by Dave Eggers // New York: Vintage Books, 2009
review by Thomas McClendon, Professor of History
man are roughly arrested (for no reason they can
discern) at one of his rental properties. They soon
find themselves incarcerated in cages erected on
the bare asphalt in a hastily converted bus station:
Camp Greyhound. The look of the place reminded
Zeitoun of nothing so much as pictures he had
seen of Guantanamo Bay. While guards, some
of them veterans of Iraq or Afghanistan, accuse
Zeitoun and his fellow immigrant of being “Al
Qaeda,” and taunt them with pork-based MRE
meals, no formal charges are brought, and they
are not allowed to make a phone call or to see
a lawyer. Their transfer, a few days later, to a
Louisiana prison brings the expectation that a
more orderly process will emerge, but in fact
the nightmare continues. A chance encounter
with a missionary, who phones Kathy at Zeitoun’s
request, leads eventually to Zeitoun’s release, after
more than three weeks of incarceration.
Zeitoun focuses our attention on two very
important American stories. One is the story of
Hurricane Katrina’s flood, a product of govern-
ment neglect of critical infrastructure and failure
to rescue citizens left stranded in the city as a
result or their poverty or infirmity. The other is
a story of the dark forces that have undermined
the rule of law in America since 9/11. It tells us
a great deal indeed about what has gone wrong
with America.
Eggers and the Zeitouns have since established
the Zeitoun Foundation “to aid in the rebuilding of
New Orleans and to promote respect for human
rights in the United States and around the world.”
I urge you to read this book and to contribute to
the foundation.
30 Southwestern Magazine
engaging find
Be Southwestern!
31WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu
Dear Southwestern University Alumni,
As my term as president of The Association of Southwestern University
Alumni draws to a close, I encourage you to view your relationship with
The Association and Southwestern as reciprocal. If you will, the value of
that relationship will increase. Take advantage of what The Association
has to offer you personally and professionally. You not only have a great
education on which to build your life, you have an extraordinary network
of alumni to draw on for friendships, career connections, advice, intel-
lectual inquiry and conversation. In turn, you can help other alumni,
Southwestern students and your alma mater by “Being Southwestern”
wherever you are.
Here are five areas on which I urge you to focus:
I.	 Alumni Leadership Development and Recognition
	 •	Help identify potential leaders.
	 •	Mentor young alumni.
	 •	Share the accomplishments of alumni you know.
II.	 Relational Connections
	 •	Plan informal gatherings of SU alumni.
	 •	Get involved with a local association, your class reunion
		 or an alumni connection group.
III.	 Professional Networking
	 •	Identify potential employers and promote job openings.
	 •	Consider sponsoring a Southwestern internship at
		 your workplace.
IV.	 Visibility and Recruitment
	 •	Refer prospective students to Southwestern.
V.	 Support Southwestern
	 •	Give a portion of your time, talents and financial support
		 to Southwestern.
Southwestern is truly a lifelong experience. I have been serving
Southwestern in various capacities since I graduated. I have given and I
have received through this relationship. It is satisfying when you can help
shape the future of an institution that helped shape you, and rewarding
to develop fulfilling personal and professional relationships. It has been
an honor to serve as your president.
Be Southwestern.
Steve A. Raben ’63
President, The Association of Southwestern University Alumni
Association
of Southwestern University Alumni
The
Alumni Association
Mission
To be a community that fosters a lifelong Southwestern
Experience by: spanning generations and geographies,
connecting ideas and individuals, inspiring learning and
service, inviting diverse perspectives and strengthening
loyalties so that The Association becomes vital in the lives
of alumni and their University.
Alumni Council
2009–2011
Steve Raben ’63
President
Blake Stanford ’81
President-Elect
Nisa Sharma ’92
Class Relations Chair
The Rev. Dr. Paul Barton ’83
Nominations and Awards Chair
Sarah Walthall Norris ’68
Homecoming and Reunions Chair
Maxie Duran Hardin ’73
Local Associations Chair
Katherine Merrill Andre ’99
Alumni Connection Groups Chair
The Rev. Milton Jordan ’62
Assembly Program Chair
Yesenia Garcia ’03
Assembly Program Chair-Elect
Lisa Dreishmire ’91
Alumni Communications Chair
Ken Holley ’71
Lifelong Learning Chair
John Dapper ’91
At-Large Member
Theodore Caryl ’76
At-Large Member
John Curry ’70
Trustee Representative
Zoe Martin ’12
Student Representative
During Student and Parent Orientation in August,
Southwestern welcomed 22 legacy students
among the 2011 first-year and transfer class.
They are pictured here with their relative who is
a Southwestern alumna/us. If you have a relative, friend or
other student whom you think would be a great addition to the
Southwestern family, please complete the Refer a Student form
at: http://www.southwestern.edu/referastudent.
32 Southwestern Magazine
alumni news
7STOPS2007 graduates Dustin Coates, Meagan Elliott and Josh Franco recently founded an online magazine
called 7STOPS. Each month, they publish seven long-form, fiction and non-fiction articles which are variations on a theme and
include perspectives from all over the world. Several Southwestern alumni have already contributed. Elliot says, “7STOPS
is essentially our liberal arts education in magazine form.”
To read the latest issue or to find out how to submit an article, visit: www.7stopsmag.com
Homecoming and Reunion weekend 2011AT A GLANCE
Number of
alumni attendees
(topping last year’s
record of 1,085)
Total number
of attendees
(again, breaking
last year’s record
high of 1,514)
Class Reunions
Homecoming
Cup Champion
2011 was the inaugural
year for the Homecoming
Cup, sponsored by Student
Foundation, in which student
organizations/groups enter to
participate in the Homecoming
Parade, Capture the Cup and
SING!, accumulating points for
each event. The organization/
group with the most points by
the end of the weekend wins
the Homecoming Cup.
SING! Winner
Best float in the
Homecoming
Parade
Capture the
Cup Winner
1,099
1,537THIRTEEN
DELTADELTADELTA
ZETA TAU ALPHA
PI KAPPA ALPHA
DELTA
DELTA
DELTA
33WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu
Over the past five years, Southwestern has more
than doubled the amount of need-based financial aid it offers
to students ($6.5 million). Unfortunately, the demonstrated
financial need of Southwestern students and their families
has increased by $10 million.
We hope you are able to help Southwestern close the gap
between student need and what the University can provide.
The return on an investment in a Southwestern student can
be exponential.
Every Gift Matters.
Please visit www.southwestern.edu/giving
to learn more about students like
Student Body President Brady Kent,
and support Southwestern scholarships.
The Original Social Network // The following Class Notes were submitted Jan. 8, 2011 through Aug. 31, 2011. Share your accom-
plishments, achievements and life milestones with friends and classmates! Submit your Class Note by visiting www.sualumni.net. Select
“Connect” from the main menu, then “Class Notes.” You may also e-mail your Class Note to alumni@southwestern.edu.
1948
Robert Coleman, Wilmore, Ky., celebrated his 60th
wedding anniversary to Marietta with his family in
the summer of 2010. Robert retired from the Billy
Graham Seminary, but continues teaching as an
adjunct professor at Asbury Theological Seminary
and was a visiting professor at Southern Baptist
Theological Seminary. He has written more than
20 books, many of which have been translated into
multiple languages. Still involved in preaching and
pastor schools, he served as dean of pastor schools
for the Billy Graham Seminary which has schools all
over the world.
1961
Mary Louise Meyers Gulley, Houston, was
installed in May 2011 as the Regent of the George
Washington Chapter (Galveston) of the Daughters of
the American Revolution for the 2011-2013 term. The
George Washington Chapter was formed June 17,
1895, as the first D.A.R. chapter in Texas.
1967
JonMorrison,Socorro, N.M., runs the Old Prospect’s
Bakery. In addition to baking and selling artisan sour-
dough and yeast breads, he sells cinnamon rolls at
1976
Laurence Musgrove, San Angelo, has written a
book titled Handmade Thinking: A Picture Book on
Reading and Drawing. He is a professor and head
of the department of English and modern languages
at Angelo State University.
1980
Kathleen MacLean Ragsdale, Weir, is the
Environmental and Conservation Services Director
for the City of Georgetown, and was named the 2010
Manager of the Year for the city.
1981
Vicki Pierce Stroeher, Huntington, W.Va., is an
associate professor of music at Marshall University.
She is an expert on 20th century English composer
Benjamin Britten (1913-1976). She was invited to
present her paper “’Without Any Tune’: The Role
of the Discursive Shift in Britten’s Interpretation
of Poetry” at the Literary Britten Conference in
Sept. 2011 at the University of Cambridge in the
United Kingdom. During the same month, Vicki and
two colleagues made transcriptions and conducted
research toward a volume of correspondence
his local farmer’s market using a recipe from the
old Southwestern Student Union Building from the
1960s. He says, “Smelling them bake brings me back
to the old SUB and Southwestern.”
Ken Peters, Georgetown, has retired as pastor of
New Braunfels Presbyterian Church after 25 years of
ministry. Prior to becoming a clergyman, Ken taught
history at Texas A&M University for seven years.
He and his wife, Marilyn, have recently relocated
to Georgetown.
1975
Randy Mitchmore, Houston, has been elected
Chairman of the Board of Trustees for the American
Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry’s Charitable
Foundation. The foundation’s main program is to
help (at no cost) survivors of domestic violence
who have had their smile damaged from abuse.
Leading a nationwide network of volunteer dentists
and laboratories, Give Back a Smile has a vision
of “Restore a Smile, Restore a Life.” For more
information, visit: http://www.aacd.com/index.
php?module=cms&page=610
Reunion
Years
34 Southwestern Magazine
class notes
Dr. Timothy Boone ’77, Houston, was elected the president of the
American Board of Urology to serve a term from January 2011 through December
2012. His role as president is to oversee the process of certification and recertifi-
cation to practice urology in America, protecting the best interests of the public.
	 Since 2000, Boone has been Chief of Urology at Methodist Hospital and is
a senior member of the Texas Methodist Hospital Research Institute (TMHRI),
where he is conducting multiple clinical trials dealing with urology problems—
from new drugs to devices. His main focus is on neurologic disorders affecting
the bladder-like spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis. Boone also maintains a
clinical professor appointment at Baylor College of Medicine, where he teaches
urology residents, and participates on a weekly basis in a basic science labora-
tory that he started at Baylor more than 10 years ago.
	 A biology major at Southwestern, Boone says that Southwestern helped
prepare him for his current professional position through one-on-one instruction,
especially in physiology. Setting his sights on medicine at Southwestern, Boone
was an early M.D./Ph.D. student at The University of Texas at Houston. He says,
“I preferred the lab and research projects so graduate studies appealed to me
more than medical school classes.”
	 Boone is glad to be able now to “give back” to Southwestern students by
helping coordinate and foster interaction between Southwestern and TMHRI for
research and education. (See Page 10 for more information on Southwestern’s
collaboration with TMHRI.) He believes that new science center at Southwestern
is a “must” for recruiting and educating students who have a lot of choices and
are very discerning. He says it will also help keep good faculty. “A university is
only as good as its faculty who are engaged in teaching and are up to date in
their field.”
	 Boone and his wife, Angela, have four children. Their daughters, Christie and
Blair, live in North Texas, where Christie is finishing a physics degree and Blair
has her student teaching experience remaining before she starts in elementary
education. Their son, Bolton, is a first-year student at Baylor, and son, Connor,
is a sophomore in high school. Still closely connected to the University, Boone’s
uncle was Southwestern’s 12th president, Durwood Fleming, and his cousin is
Dan Stultz ’72. (See page 24.)
2012_Winter_ISSUU
2012_Winter_ISSUU
2012_Winter_ISSUU
2012_Winter_ISSUU
2012_Winter_ISSUU
2012_Winter_ISSUU

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2012_Winter_ISSUU

  • 1. 1WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu winter 2012 FORWARD THINKING With an eye to the future, the University announces bold initiatives.
  • 2. southwestern university’s core purpose Fostering a liberal arts community whose values and actions encourage contributions toward the well-being of humanity. southwestern university’s core values Cultivating academic excellence. Promoting lifelong learning and a passion for intellectual and personal growth. Fostering diverse perspectives. Being true to oneself and others. Respecting the worth and dignity of persons. Encouraging activism in the pursuit of justice and the common good. Southwestern University’s recruiting of students, awarding of financial aid, and operation of programs and facilities are without regard to sex, race, color, religion, age, physical handicap, national or ethnic origin, or any other impermissible factor. The University’s commitment to equal opportunity includes nondiscrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. Southwestern is printed on FSC certified Galerie Art Cover and Text by TWG Plus, Austin, Texas. board of trustees * Ex-Officio # Honorary Southwestern is published semiannually by the Office of University Relations. Bulk rate postage paid at Austin, Texas. Merriman Morton ’63, Austin, Chair Larry J. Haynes ’72, Coppell, Vice Chair R. Griffin Lord, Belton, Secretary-Treasurer Martin Aleman Jr. ’68, Austin Mary Delmore Balagia, Dallas L. James Bankston ’70, Houston Lisa Barrentine, Allen Douglas M. Benold ’44, Georgetown W. Earl Bledsoe*, Plano Roy H. Cullen#, Houston John S. Curry ’70, Pampa James E. Dorff*, San Antonio Robert W. Dupuy ’69, Dallas Thomas A. Forbes ’71, Austin James W. Foster ’72, Houston Jack Garey, Georgetown Roberto L. Gómez ’69, San Antonio Sarah Gould-Stotts ’10, Charlottesville, Va. Robert H. Graham, Houston Kay Granger, Fort Worth Ronald D. Henderson, Plano Janice Riggle Huie*, Houston Henry C. Joyner, Colleyville Robert W. Karr ’71, St. Louis, Mo. Bart C. Koontz ’78, San Antonio J. Michael Lowry*, Fort Worth Red McCombs ’49, San Antonio Michael McKee, Hurst J. Eric McKinney ’72, Georgetown David J. McNitzky ’77, San Antonio Laura A. Merrill ’84, Harlingen Charles R. Millikan ’68, Pearland Barbara Prats Neely ’77, Fort Worth Ernesto Nieto ’64, Kyle Steven A. Raben ’63*, Houston Robert T. Rork ’62, San Antonio Jake B. Schrum ’68*, Georgetown Robert C. Scott, San Antonio Peter A. Sessions ’78, Dallas Thomas V. Shockley, Georgetown H. Blake Stanford ’81*, Austin Stephen G. Tipps, Houston Donald W. Underwood ’70, Plano James V. Walzel, Houston D. Max Whitfield*, Albuquerque, N.M. Sarah Woolley, ’11, Austin OFFICE OF Communications Eric Bumgardner Creative Director Kristina W. Moore Writer/Editor Antonio Banda Senior Designer Cindy Locke Associate Vice President for University Relations Ellen Davis Director of News and Media Relations John Kotarski ’93 Director of Web Development and Communications Danielle Stapleton ’05 Associate Director of New Media magazine@southwestern.edu OFFICE OF Alumni and Parents Georgianne Hewett ’90 Associate Vice President for Alumni and Parent Relations JoAnn Lucero Associate Director of Alumni and Parent Relations Grace Josey Pyka ’05 Associate Director of Alumni and Parent Relations alumni@southwestern.edu parents@southwestern.edu chief administrative officers Jake B. Schrum ’68, President Richard L. Anderson, Vice President for Fiscal Affairs Gerald Brody, Vice President for Student Life James W. Hunt, Provost and Dean of the Faculty Beverly Jones, University Chaplain W. Joseph King ’93, Vice President for Innovation C. Richard McKelvey, Vice President for University Relations Dave Voskuil, Vice President for Enrollment Services Francie Schroeder, Executive Assistant to the President Ronald L. Swain, Senior Advisor to the President for Strategic Planning and Assessment Main: (512) 863-6511 Alumni & Parents: (800) 960-6363 Office of Admission: (800) 252-3166 whitley to insert Share Your Ideas | Make a Gift | Refer a Student www.southwestern.edu/pride 2 Southwestern Magazine
  • 3. winter 2011 On the Cover Renovations to the historic Roy and Lillie Cullen Building are nearly complete. All 467 of the building’s windows have been replaced, and work is in progress to replace the elevator and reconfigure both the second and third floors for office and classroom space. In every issue 4 | President’s Message 14 | On Campus 16 | Athletics 30 | Engaging Find 32 | Alumni News 34 | Class Notes 39 | Last Word Features 6 | Going Boldly into the Future: New initiatives look ahead while preserving our Core Purpose and Core Values. 18 | Academics In Focus: Broad Strokes Art History students also learn the philosophy, religion, history, politics and class structure of a time period or culture. 22 | 2011 Alumni Awards Five SU alumni are recognized for their extraordinary accomplishments. 28 | Behind the Lectern: Big Events The Brown Symposium, The Shilling Lecture and The Writer’s Voice feature big names. 3WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu  The integration of the A. Frank Smith, Jr. Library Center and Information Technology Services will allow Southwestern students additional opportunities for communication and collaboration.
  • 4. n a new book titled The Innovative University, Clay Christensen and Henry Eyring conclude that traditional colleges and universities are going to have to “change their DNA”—and change it quickly—if they are going to weather the storms that are threatening institutions of higher education. They explain that to survive and thrive in the new landscape of higher education, schools are going to have to rewrite the rules of the game. The winners will be the ones that can success- fully scale back their spending on luxuries such as climbing walls, and compete instead to make students more curious, more committed to a meaningful cause, more contemplative and more compassionate. That’s good news for Southwestern, because this is our DNA! In the coming months and years, Southwestern will change as will much of American higher education. Our goal is to steward our University through this change so that we are known as an innovative, sustainable, relevant and distinc- tive provider of educational experiences that are essential to successful and fulfilling lives in the 21st century. At my annual State of the University address to faculty and staff in September, I outlined a series of new initiatives that are designed to help us take a new path forward. These initiatives include the possibility of adding several new degree programs as well as a January Term. Another initiative will be to integrate the opera- tions of our A. Frank Smith, Jr. Library Center and our Office of Information Technology Services under the leadership of a Chief Information Officer (CIO). Many of our peer institutions, including Bryn Mawr, Allegheny, Rhodes, Connecticut College, Middlebury and Occidental have already undertaken this step as a way of ensuring that students and faculty have access to the best infor- mation possible in this new digital age. A search committee that includes representatives from across campus has been appointed to identify the best possible candidate for the new CIO position. At the end of October, we announced two other initiatives that are being made possible by gener- ous gifts from three of our alumni. We will be reinstating football in the fall of 2013 and fielding a new women’s varsity lacrosse team in the spring of 2014. More details on all of these initiatives can be found in this issue of the magazine. None of these initiatives are without contro- versy, and we have had many lively discussions on campus since they were unveiled. While these changes may be hard for some to accept, I hope members of our community will eventually support them as a way to ensure a bright future for the University. But what is more important than all of these changes and initiatives is that we continue to embrace our core purpose: Fostering a liberal arts community whose values and actions encourage contributions toward the well-being of humanity. As James T. Laney, former president of Emory University once said, “We are created to serve. If we do not care for something larger than ourselves and do it with a sense of heart, then we ourselves shrivel up. Society, the larger good itself, atrophies. The sense of service and the sense of ambition are twin aspects of educa- tion, and that we must take into account. What it means to be an educated person is not only to be a mind and to seek one’s own interests, but also to realize that as one enlarges their range of interests and serves them, one is fulfilled.” This is what Southwestern is about. Jake B. Schrum ’68 President Our Path Forward I 4 Southwestern Magazine president’s message
  • 5. 5WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu Southwestern Science Center engaging minds. tr a nsfor ming li v es. Southwestern’s highest fundraising priority is to create an exemplary undergraduate science facility, which will foster a cross-disciplinary community and will enhance Southwestern’s tradition of excellence in science education. Our plan is to create a new science center to house multiple teaching and research laboratories, classrooms, offices and multidisciplinary gathering spaces. To learn more about Southwestern’s planned new science facility, please visit www.southwestern.edu/giving/sciences
  • 6. ince its inception, Southwestern has been think- ing ahead about the way it educates and prepares future generations. Today, Southwestern continues to think ahead. Noting a “renewed sense of urgency,” President Jake B. Schrum ’68 announced at his September 2011 State of the University address a series of bold new initiatives designed to help provide a path forward for the University amidst a continually changing higher education environment. Provost and Dean of the Faculty Jim Hunt says Southwestern has a history of rising to the occasion, but also notes that “we must work diligently to ensure that our students are getting the educational experience they deserve.” With the student experience top of mind, the Board of Trustees charged Schrum with pursuing bold initiatives and putting Southwestern on the path toward achieving the goals the University community outlined in Shaping Our Future, The Strategic Plan for 2010–2020. (See Page 7 for a summary.) “The immediate initiatives and those that are longer-term will all benefit the students and the institution going forward,” Hunt says. Sarah Gould-Stotts ’10, a member of the Board, adds, “Southwestern needs these initiatives to stay competitive in the field of higher education, to continue providing its students with the highest-quality liberal arts educa- tion, and to continue making ‘valuable contributions to the well-being of humanity.’” leading the way Rick McKelvey, vice president for university relations, suggests that now is not the time to be overly reflective, but intentional. “President Schrum, the senior staff and the Board are fully aware that the hardest work is ahead, and that there is an urgent need to be intentional about defining and vetting these bold initiatives with an eye to implementation as soon as possible, in order to strengthen Southwestern’s position as a leading liberal arts institu- tion and—most important—to benefit our students.” 1895: The University became a co-educational institution. 1907–09: Southwestern graduated three of the first five Rhodes Scholars in Texas. 1914: The tradition of inviting contemporary speakers and artists to campus began. 1949: William C. Finch became president and was later credited with refining the University’s focus on liberal arts education. 1981: Roy B. Shilling was elected president, transform- ing Southwestern from a regional to a national liberal arts college and making $60 million in campus enhancements during his tenure. 1994: Southwestern was awarded one of only 280 chapters of Phi Beta Kappa, which celebrates and advocates excellence in the liberal arts and sciences. 2000: President Jimmy Carter was the keynote speaker at the inauguration of President Jake B. Schrum ’68, garnering the largest crowd ever assembled on campus. 2002: The Paideia® Program was launched at Southwestern. 2005: Southwestern began offering Living Learning Communities to strengthen the First Year Seminar program. S 6 Southwestern Magazine BOLDSTEPS for Example...
  • 7. In addition to the integration of the A. Frank Smith, Jr. Library Center with the Office of Information Technology Services and the addition of football and women’s lacrosse, these bold initiatives include the following three proposals designed to increase revenues and support the University’s academic mission: • A January Term that will offer students more options for completing their educational requirements, and faculty more opportunities for teaching. • Working with The Methodist Hospital Research Institute of Houston to develop a curriculum for a new master’s degree in translational medicine. Often called “bench to bedside,” translational medicine seeks to quickly move research findings into medical practices that improve patient care. • The focus of Southwestern’s current Quality Enhancement Plan on the Paideia® Program—if approved in 2012 by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS)—will equate to “Paideia for all” and will help Southwestern recruit students and raise the level of intentionality for interdisciplinary studies on campus. There are ongoing conversations about other academic initiatives, includ- ing a Master of Arts degree in teaching and a possible re-envisioning of the business program. While the Board of Trustees has approved the proposals, they will also require approval through the University’s governance councils and accredi- tation from the SACS, as well as the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, explains Hunt. supporting our core Schrum says, “These initiatives represent a critical path to sustaining our mission. Every action is being taken to sustain and enhance the Southwestern Experience—to support the social sciences, the humanities, the natural sciences and the fine arts that lie at our core.” Chairman of the Board of Trustees Merriman Morton says of the initia- tives, “The positive expectations of these initiatives will be that the financial strength of the University will continue to be strong; there will be contin- ued focus on academic excellence; the commitment to provide a positive educational and maturing experience for students will continue; and the commitment to fulfill our Core Purpose and Core Values will continue.” 7WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu Shaping Our Future: The Strategic Plan for Southwestern University 2010–2020 www.southwestern.edu/plan Overarching Vision: Over the next decade, Southwestern University will continue to position itself as a top-tier, national liberal arts and sciences college by building upon its greatest strength—providing a transformational, residential, liberal arts and sciences education that empowers an increas- ingly diverse range of students to lead fulfilling lives in a global community. Strategic Direction: Focus on our academic mission—our commitment to providing every student with an education that extends beyond the simple transmission of knowledge and skills to a concept of learning as a broad, integrated and trans- formational process. Supporting Strategies: Enhance Our Campus Experience and Residence Life Create a more vibrant, diverse and student-friendly campus that will enhance the campus experience and the quality of student life, and will contribute to attracting and retaining students that are best able to benefit from Southwestern’s academic mission. Build Far-Reaching Visibility and Recognition Build far-reaching visibility and recognition for the University as an exceptional national undergraduate liberal arts and sciences institution known for engaging minds and transforming lives. Ensure the Financial Vitality and Overall Sustainability of the Institution Ensure the financial vitality and overall sustainability of the institution by building an ever-stronger financial foundation that will increase our ability to invest in our academic enterprise, undergird our commitments and reach our aspirations. the Blueprint “Southwestern…is one of the few jewels of the Southwest whose mission is to prepare a new generation to contribute to a changing society, and to prosper in their jobs, whatever and wherever in the world they may be.” —Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About Colleges (2006–2007 edition)
  • 8. “It’s not about each entity,” Joey King ’93, executive director of the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE), and vice president for innovation at Southwestern, says of the forth- coming integration of the A. Frank Smith, Jr. Library Center and the Office of Information Technology Services. “It’s about the information and infor- mation services the University can provide to its constituents.” Provost Jim Hunt sees the integration as an “opportunity to strengthen the role of the library and instructional technology in the academic program” as well as enhance the campus experi- ence and the quality of student life as outlined in the Strategic Plan. Neither King nor Lynne Brody, dean of library services at Southwestern, can say specifically how the post-integrated library will look physically, but they agree that there will most likely be more space devoted to students in the form of an “information commons” or “knowledge center” where students may have opportunities ranging from individual study to group projects and casual conversation to roundtable discussions. Todd Watson, director of systems and networks, says that this idea goes hand-in-hand with providing the campus community with the ability to access as well as discern information. “One of our goals is to teach students how to be information literate,” he says. According to King, Southwestern is the latest among its peer institutions like Occidental, Middlebury and Rhodes, to adopt the “best practice” of library and ITS integration. As part of the process, Southwestern has begun a search for a new Chief Information Officer (CIO), who will oversee the integration and will help the University best take advantage of digital tech- nology in service to the liberal arts. King, Brody and Watson are on the search committee for the new CIO and feel strongly that he or she should have not only a clear vision of infor- mation technology, but of the pedagogy of the institution as a whole. King says, “Southwestern will not take a cookie cutter approach.” Watson echoes, “We’re not trying to reproduce other schools’ models; rather, we want to customize the program to Southwestern.” Brody adds that “the new CIO’s ability to understand and articulate the mission and the liberal arts focus of this institution will allow for the infu- sion of technology that will enhance rather than change the services we already provide … Our intent and hope is that our services will improve through the process, becoming stronger and better for our students, faculty, staff and other constituents.” 1 Library/ITS Integration INITIATIVES “This initiative addresses the reality that most students in today’s world search for information via the avenues that technology provides. Research continues to reinforce this strategic direction…as a key component to move Southwestern forward as an institution.” —Merriman Morton Chairman of the Board of Trustees 8 Southwestern Magazine THE
  • 9. A Richer Learning Experience In response to the often-asked question, “Will there still be books in the library?,” the answer is yes. Brody says, “Students will find themselves having a richer learning experience thanks to new innovations in the way they are instructed. Characteristic of the Southwestern course experience, a strong faculty presence and personal interaction will continue, but will be enhanced by technology.” Watson’s hope is that there will be an increased focus on technology and how it can enhance the academic program. He says, “It’s important to step back and see how both organizations can work together to enhance the student experience.” Because information is increasingly available in new ways, Southwestern has the opportunity to gain access to significantly more information and resources. King references a recent NITLE pilot study that provided millions of digital holdings to students who previously had access to virtually none in their field of study (Chinese, in this case). As a result, students said their “lives have been changed.” King adds, “The key is that if students, faculty and others want information, Southwestern will endeavor to provide it, as well as to have the library staff be as available as they’ve always been or even more so.” Some see the integration as a transition that embraces the liberal arts philosophy of adapting, learning, changing and growing. Brody responds that “in theory that is true, as long as the core values of a liberal arts educa- tion—creative thinking, careful reading and analysis of texts—are not lost or diluted, and as long as we’re careful to maintain a balance by building on and enhancing our current strengths.” King, Brody and Watson agree that the focus during the integration should remain on serving the Southwestern community. Watson says, “We have a bright future. It’s all about providing students, faculty and staff with access to the best information and resources available. Brody adds, “I see this as a positive move that will enhance the services that are already available.” In a 2007 article published in Reference Sciences Review,1 author Steve McKinzie asks the question, “Can academic libraries and information technology (IT) services work together closely?” The answer, he says, is certainly yes. “They can and have done so since the dawn of automation. … Even so, in recent years the bond between the two has grown more intimate. The combination of their shared commitment to the effective management of information and the library’s increased dependence on digital resources has brought the two together.” The goal for academic institutions, McKinzie explains, should be “a superb library and IT coordination that serves faculty and students effectively. … Service and real cooperation among staff and professionals are the central goals of merged service organizations. Beyond that, nothing else matters.” Chris D. Ferguson, who oversees a blended organization as associate provost for information and technology services at Pacific Lutheran University, says “The (library/IT) mergers work best at small colleges.” David W. Dodd, CIO at Xavier University, who oversaw their recent library/IT integration, tells his staff, “Go fearlessly into the future.” 1 Steve McKinzie, (2007) “Library and IT mergers: how successful are they?,” Reference Services Review, Vol. 35 Issue: 3, pp. 340 – 343 9WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu Graduate in less than four years, add a minor, study abroad—these are just a few reasons why Southwestern students would like the option of a January Term. “The primary reason for considering a January Term is the potential to provide innovative educa- tional opportunities for our students,” says Provost Hunt. Present on many residential liberal arts campuses (including Southwestern at one time), the structure of the January Term allows for educational experiences that may not be available in the fall and spring semesters. Hunt explains that courses offered during January Term may provide opportunities for off-campus learning activities, opportunities for collaborative efforts between faculty across disci- plines, and opportunities for students who may need to complete additional course requirements. In addi- tion, he says, “Revenue from a January Term would provide additional resources that the University could use for its highest priorities, the highest of which is our Strategic Direction, as laid out in Shaping Our Future: The Strategic Plan for Southwestern University 2010–2020.” //JANUARY TERM 2 CompanyIn Good WANT MORE? For more information about Shaping Our Future, visit www.southwestern.edu/plan
  • 10. More than 40 percent of all Southwestern applicants express interest in our science programs and about one in five students majors in one of the natural sciences. In addition, Southwestern science students have research experiences typically available only to graduate students at larger research universities, and three quarters of our graduates who have applied to medical, dental and veterinary school over the past 15 years have been admitted. These statistics emphasize the importance of our science programs as well as the opportunities for collaborative research offered to our students with organizations such as the Welch Foundation’s Summer Scholar Program, the Texas Life-Sciences Collaboration Center, and—most recently—The Methodist Hospital Research Institute (TMHRI). In May 2010, Dr. Charles Millikan ’68, a member of Southwestern’s Board of Trustees and the vice president for spiritual care and values integration for The Methodist Hospital System of Houston, invited President Schrum, Provost Hunt and Professor of Biology Ben Pierce to TMHRI to hear a proposal for collaboration between Southwestern and the research institute. “The opportunity to work with TMHRI in Houston is a chance for Southwestern students to be exposed to world-class scientists, internships and a possible master’s degree in translational medicine,” explains Vice President McKelvey. Three Southwestern students had such an opportunity when they were selected as 2011 summer interns at TMHRI, resulting in an evolving relationship with one of the leading healthcare systems in the U.S. Since then, Mauro Ferrari, president and CEO of TMHRI, has suggested that the relationship between the two institutions could continue in a number of ways. Recently, Pierce and Associate Professors of Biology Maria Todd and Maria Cuevas have met with TMHRI representatives to discuss the possibilities, including that of a master’s degree offered by Southwestern in collaboration with TMHRI. While exploring TMHRI’s vision for collaboration with Southwestern, Hunt explains, “If a master’s program were approved and initiated, it would be a fifth-year program and would start small with approximately 10 students per year.” Translational medicine is a medical practice based on interventional epidemiology and is regarded as a natural progression from evidence-based medicine. It integrates research from the basic sciences, social sciences and political sciences with the aim of optimizing patient care and preventive measures which may extend beyond healthcare services. In short, it is the process of turning appropriate biological discoveries into drugs and medical devices that can be used in the treatment of patients.2 2 http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/05/17/ grove-backs-an-engineers-approach-to- medicine/?ref=technology “Grove backs an engineer’s approach to medicine”; New York Times blog Collaboration in the Sciences 3 10 Southwestern Magazine WANT MORE? For more information about the collaboration between Southwestern and TMHRI, visit http://bit.ly/TMHRIv exploring Opportunities
  • 11. For 10 years, the Paideia® Program at Southwestern has endeav- ored to transcend conventional approaches to teaching and learning through a student-driven, faculty-led experience. The program has promoted connections between academic courses, offered intercultural and diversity experiences, encouraged civic engage- ment, and supported collaborative or guided research and creative works. While approximately 25 percent of Southwestern students have benefited from these experiences, the University hopes to offer the experience to an increasing number of students going forward—to ALL Southwestern students, in fact. If the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools approves Southwestern’s proposed Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) in June 2013, implementation of the faculty development phase of the project will begin the following academic year, with initial implementation in the fall of 2014. “This is not a major overhaul,” Provost Hunt says, “but a redesigning of the curriculum already in place…in effect, it will be ‘Paideia for All.’” While students typically use the curriculum guidelines of the catalog under which they entered Southwestern, they may choose instead to adhere to the guidelines of the most recent catalog. In the “Paideia for All” model, the First Year Seminar would become an introduction to a topic/theme that students would then follow throughout their time at Southwestern. Three of their eight required general education courses would be clustered around this topic/theme. Professor of Art History and member of the QEP commit- tee Thomas Howe suggests that the topics/themes might include: chaos theory, sustainability, global warming, evolution and behavioral sciences, food culture and health, and more. The program would culminate with an upper-level seminar or salon, maintaining the mutual support and challenge of the current faculty-led Paideia cohorts. Howe says the committee would also like to maintain the current Paideia aspects of “interdisciplinary critical investigation which precedes responsible engagement, encouraging habits of lifelong integra- tive, interdisciplinary discourse and engagement, assisting students as they develop into public intellectuals who become members of an alert, informed electorate.” Hunt says that while professors may need to look at curriculum in a new way under the redesigned program, students are sure to benefit from interdisciplinary study through which additional connections are made in the clustered courses, as well as through civic engagement opportunities and intercultural experiences. “From my perspective, Paideia’s guiding principles are at the core of a liberal arts education and this program empowers students to make meaningful connections between their academic interests, future goals and personal passions. Every Southwestern student should have an opportunity to make those connections because they are so integral to maximizing the Southwestern Experience.” —Sarah Gould-Stotts ’10 Paideia for All 5 11WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu SOUTHWESTERN is exploring the viability of institut- ing a Master of Arts in teaching degree, which would allow students to receive an undergraduate degree in a discipline other than education and continue with a fifth-year master’s program to complete certification. “We’re having an ongoing discussion about this and alternate options in the Education Department,” says Provost Hunt, who explains that any changes to the academic program must first go through the University’s governance process. Currently, the Education Department offers students the option to major both in education and a content field, completing in four years what a master’s program might offer in five. A four-year dual major program is competitive with five-year programs offered by Southwestern’s peer institutions, primarily serving those seeking secondary teaching certifica- tion in content fields like mathematics, English and history. However, some Southwestern graduates decide late in their academic career to seek teaching certification and cannot meet all the requirements in a four-year time frame. In spite of current negative trends in the economy and in the field of education, Southwestern has maintained steady growth in teaching graduates. Hunt and the members of the Education Department hope to have enough information to make a deci- sion on whether to move forward or not by the fall semester. MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING// 4
  • 12. Thanks to $6 million in gifts from former student athletes, Southwestern will rein- state its football program in fall 2013 and will create a new women’s varsity lacrosse team in spring 2014. As the T-shirts of many Southwestern students and alumni can attest, Pirate foot- ball has been “undefeated since 1950.” That was the year that then President William C. Finch and the Board of Trustees reluctantly announced that football would be dropped from the intercollegiate athlet- ics program. First mentioned in the faculty minutes of Nov. 19, 1895, intercollegiate football officially began at Southwestern in 1908. The team gained national attention as a powerhouse team under the leadership of Coach Randolph M. Medley when Southwestern went 9-1 during the 1943–44 season, winning the Sun Bowl in January 1944 and again the following year. Sixty years later, Board Chair Merriman Morton says, “Probably no initia- tive has received more conversation and comment among alumni, students and faculty than the decision to reinstate football at Southwestern.” Joe Seeber ’63, a former Southwestern basketball player, and his wife, Elaine, have pledged $5 million to launch the new programs. Red McCombs ’49, who played football at Southwestern, and his wife, Charline ’50, have pledged $1 million. Brent and Joanne Powers Austin ’74 also have made a gift to support the new programs. “Both Mr. Seeber and Dr. McCombs were varsity athletes at Southwestern and their generosity is representative of the culmination of their love of amateur athletics and their commitment to Southwestern,” says President Schrum. Adding football and women’s lacrosse will bring Southwestern’s comple- ment of varsity teams to 20—on par with the University’s peers in the Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference and the Associated Colleges of the South. Glada Munt, director of intercollegiate athletics at Southwestern, says that the addition of both programs is expected to strengthen student recruiting, with football expected to attract up to 100 male students and lacrosse to bring in 20 female student-athletes. Munt also says that, once fully functioning, Southwestern football should be able to sustain itself financially and should generate a surplus that could be used for other University priorities like updated facilities, for example. While home football games will be played at the new Georgetown stadium complex, the University plans to use land it owns on the east side of campus to build facilities to support both of the new programs, including two practice fields, a 15,000 square-foot field house, and a new track to support the track and cross-country programs. There are also plans to upgrade the existing locker rooms for field sports in the Corbin J. Robertson Center. These plans address one of the supporting strategies of the Strategic Plan—enhancing the financial vitality and overall sustainability of the institution—which calls on the University to “develop a long-range vision and initiate an East Campus master plan to enhance our academic enterprise, enrich the lives of all members of the Southwestern community, and provide a foundation for the future growth and prosperity of the institution well into the next century with self-sustaining activities and operations.”  6“There are many places you can get an education, but not many places transform lives the way Southwestern does. This isn’t about football—it’s about transforming lives.” —Joe Seeber ’63 12 Southwestern Magazine Enhancing Athletics To see a video of Joe Seeber ’63 speaking about his decision to make a gift to bring back football and add women’s lacrosse, visit http://bit.ly/sufblax WANT MORE?
  • 13. 13WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu Be Southwestern! Who do you know that may follow in your (Pirate Bike) tracks? No, not the living legacy you left in Austin when you almost got that Captain Ruter tattoo. Your academic tracks. Like you, the successful Southwestern student of the future:  Is highly motivated.  Looks for intellectual challenges.  Is civic/community minded.  Makes learning a top priority. Got a name or two? Good! Now, go to www.southwestern.edu/referastudent and send them our way. texas’ first u nivers ity
  • 14.  During the 2010–11 academic year, 104 Southwestern University students gave a total of 3,275 volunteer hours to the Operation Achievement program. Operation Achievement, a mentoring program that Southwestern has run for nearly 25 years in partnership with the Georgetown Independent School District, has received a gift from the Margaret A. Cargill Foundation of Minnesota that will enable the University to continue offering the program for at least five more years. Operation Achievement serves students from all three Georgetown middle schools. Director Joni Ragle says the program helps students by providing them with Southwestern mentors who serve as positive role models and by teaching them problem-solving skills. Operation Achievement is a student-run orga- nization with six Southwestern students serving as “staff supervisors” and three who serve as lead mentors. The entire staff formulates policies and procedures for the program and plans and imple- ments all the activities. Three of the staff supervi- sors serve as liaisons with the middle schools. Another 50-85 Southwestern students from a variety of majors serve as mentors in the program each semester. In 2010–2011, 104 Southwestern students gave a total of 3,275 volunteer hours to the program. Sherry Adrian, associate professor of educa- tion, says, “Operation Achievement is vital to our department for the opportunities it provides to our students, and because it aligns with our department’s mission of educating and support- ing students in the public schools.” Sophomore education major Lindsey Ruther says, “We aren’t just helping with math problems, we are changing lives for the better. We are build- ing relationships with these students that in turn help with self-confidence, academic success and peer relations.” In addition, students participate in a weekly “enrichment activity.” Science classes have led hands-on experiments, coaches and athletes have offered sports clinics, the Music Department has invited the students to rehearsals, the Theatre Department has provided tickets for plays, and the Police Department has taught self-defense classes. Each semester, the students do a community service project, and the program culminates each spring with an “All-Campus Day,” when these potential future Pirates tour the Southwestern campus, attend classes with their mentors, eat in The Commons and see what a college dorm is like. “We’re thrilled the program will be able to continue,” says Ragle. Operation Achievement Receives Financial Boost 14 Southwestern Magazine WANT MORE? Go to In Focus at www.southwestern.edu/newsroom on campus “We aren’t just helping with math problems, we are changing lives for the better. We are building relationships with these students that in turn help with self- confidence, academic success and peer relations.”
  • 15. British Business Eight Southwestern students who studied abroad in London last semester—Isaac Bernal, Sarah Chatfield, Dempsey Jones, Jennifer Juergens, Veronica Luna, Marlena Serrano, Kamna Tripathi and Lizette Villarreal—participated in internships while there. Maria Kruger, internship coordinator for the Office of Career Services, explains that students can express an interest in internships after they are accepted into the London program and then the Center for Academic Programs Abroad arranges several interviews for them when they get to London. David Olson, assistant professor and director of communication studies internships, says that while it can be difficult to fit an internship into a class schedule and cultural experiences in a new city, it is worthwhile because it gives students an added perspective they might not get as interns in the U.S. Tripathi, a junior communication studies major, interned with Action for Advocacy, a social justice organization based in England and Wales. Villarreal, a junior communication studies major, worked as a marketing intern with INTO Higher, a network of university-based study centers. She says, “This internship experience (showed) me how interconnected the world is, and how all it takes is a little bit of patience, understanding and a lot of improvisation to form successful relation- ships with other cultures.” In addition, Bernal interned with the Terrence Higgins Trust fundraising and press teams, Chatfield interned with Phoenix Futures; Juergens interned with Shelter England; Luna interned with Youth Net; Jones interned at three different radio stations; and Serrano interned with the Royal Aeronautic Society. Doing Well at Doing Good What would you do if you had $3,000 to give away? That was the challenge facing students in the new First Year Seminar (FYS) titled “Doing Good and Doing It Well: The Theory and Practice of Philanthropy,” taught by Assistant Professor of History Melissa Byrnes. “I thought an FYS with a focus on philanthropy meshed well with our students’ interests and the University’s core purpose,” Byrnes says. The class included a broad theoretical discussion of philan- thropy from multiple disciplinary perspectives, and included a local, practical project in which students were asked to solicit grant proposals from area nonprofits and select one of them to receive a grant. The students originally had $1,500 to give to a deserving local organization, but when Scott Alarcon from the Georgetown Health Foundation visited the class, he was so impressed with the students that he offered to match the amount with one caveat—the class couldn’t take the easy way out and divide up the money. The students received four proposals and then visited each site. “The opportunity to be part of a professional group doing a real site visit with the local organizations was nerve wracking at first but one of the best things I’ve done here so far,” said first-year student Angelyn Convertino. The organization selected to receive the grant was the Boys & Girls Club of Georgetown, which is using the money to start a garden to teach the children it serves about gardening, as well as about the importance of good nutrition. “I thought an FYS with a focus on philanthropy meshed well with our students’ interests and the University’s core purpose...” 15WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu BIT OF A STRETCH “It was something we had already thought would be a fun thing to do in the future, so we said to ourselves, ‘well, why not now?’” Erin Cressy says of the theatre production company that she and fellow sophomore Emma Martinsen founded in Houston with their friend Wiley DeWeese, a student at New York University. Creating Bit of a Stretch Theatre Company turned out to be not much of a stretch at all. The group’s first production, Floyd Collins, sold out two of four performances. Set to do at least one show during summer 2012, Cressy says, “We can’t do shows while school is in session … we have to start planning and reserving spaces and getting rights to shows—it’s a really long process.” As Bit of a Stretch is meant to be purely nonprofit, Martinsen, Cressy and DeWeese cover most of the behind-the-scenes work on their own, including costumes, lighting design and operation, music, directing, producing and finances. These skills help in their classes at Southwestern as well. Cressy and Martinsen are taking their first directing class, even though they’ve already directed three plays together. Cressy says, “We’ve already been practicing the theory but we just didn’t know it.”
  • 16. Senior men’s soccer player Alex Keller and senior swimmer Sarah Ayers were the 2011 recipi- ents of the esteemed Dr. Tex Kassen and Dr. Carla Lowry Athlete-of-the-Year Awards. Keller, a midfielder from Houston, led the Pirates in goals, assists and points in 2011. One of the team captains, he started in 18 of the 19 contests in which he competed, scoring nine goals—two game winners—and assisting nine times for a total of 27 points, making him the fifth highest point getter in the SCAC. For his outstanding play, Keller was an SCAC Player-of-the-Week, as well as All-SCAC First Team and NSCAA All-West Region Second Team. He led the Pirates in every way imaginable as evidenced by his selection to the SCAC All-Sportsmanship Team and SCAC Fall 2010 Student-Athlete Academic Honor Roll. “Not only was AK one of the most dynamic forwards in the conference, but he was also one of the classiest individuals to compete at any level,” says Head Men’s Soccer Coach Don Gregory. “It is an honor to say that AK made a massive imprint on our program with his friendly personality and outstanding character.” Ayers, also from Houston, exploded in the pool during the 2010–11 Pirate swim season. She was the SCAC Event Champion in the 100 back and earned an NCAA “A” Cut qualification and All-SCAC Team pick. Representing Southwestern at the NCAA Championships, Ayers came in seventh place in the 100 back event, earning Southwestern’s first-ever All-America honors in swimming. While serving as the team captain, Ayers was named SCAC Swimmer-of-the-Week and is the current record holder in the 100 back, 100 fly, and 400 free relay. She was also selected to the CoSIDA Academic All-District team for her outstanding work in the classroom. “This award truly exhibits Sarah’s talents and abilities that have enabled her to achieve success athletically and academically,” says Former Assistant Men’s and Women’s Swimming Coach Sarah Woodbury. “She is a strong leader and has been a vital part of the team’s success.” Kassen and Lowry are former Southwestern Directors of Athletics who expected excellence from all who wore the Southwestern uniform. They were advocates for all student-athletes and had great respect for those who worked hard, were exceptional performers and exemplified great sportsmanship. Keller and Ayers were honored and received their awards at their respective sporting events during the 2011–12 academic year. Keller, Ayers Named 2011 Athletes of the Year Ayers photo by Shelley Dormont ’11 16 Southwestern Magazine pirate athletics
  • 17. World-renowned distance runner and five-time Olympian Francie Larrieu Smith (above, center) has been Southwestern’s head cross country and track and field coach for 13 seasons. She recently returned from her duties as an assistant track and field coach for the 2011 Pan American Games, held in October in Guadalajara, Mexico. “This type of coaching was never my goal, but it’s been fun and rewarding,” she says. The Pan Am Games opportunity was Smith’s third international coaching experience. “This time was different,” she says, “because it was track and field (rather than cross country) and track and field is my thing!” She says she especially enjoyed helping the athletes negoti- ate the starting line and call room process. “I was able to help because I’ve been there,” she says, “and I know it can be nerve wracking.” During the course of her 30-year career, Smith established 36 U.S. records and 12 world bests in distances ranging from 1,000 to 10,000 meters. She was selected by Runner’s World magazine as “The Most Versatile Runner of the Quarter Century.” As an Olympian, she had her best finish in 1988 with a fifth place finish in the 10,000 meters at Seoul, South Korea. As a crowning achievement, she was the flag bearer for the U.S. Olympic Team in Barcelona, Spain (1992). Smith holds a Master of Education degree in sports admin- istration from The University of Texas at Austin. During her tenure at Southwestern, she has taken two athletes to the NCAA Cross Country Championships and has coached athletes to South/Southeast Region honors 17 times and All-SCAC honors 16 times. In track and field, she has coached two athletes and three relay teams to SCAC Championship titles and 24 athletes to All-SCAC honors. Hit the Switch // Thanks to a generous anonymous gift, Southwestern’s soccer and lacrosse programs are embarking on a new era of competition at Southwestern—night games. New lights for the soccer/lacrosse field, a pedestrian walkway and a parking lot were installed this fall. A dedication ceremony was held on October 21, when the Pirates took on SCAC Conference opponent, Hendrix College. The new lights will allow the teams to practice and compete on the field later into the evening, reducing the amount of class time missed by student-athletes. Night games will also improve the fan experience for students and community members, and elevate the competition environ- ment for Pirate athletes. However, Glada Munt, associate vice president and director of intercol- legiate athletics, notes that the new lights will be used judiciously to stay in line with Southwestern’s energy conservation and green initiatives. “This addition will take the (soccer) program to an even higher level as the night venue will be a significant boost to recruiting and to student and fan attendance,” said Coach Gregory. “It has been a dream for quite a while to play under the lights, and now ‘hitting the switch’ will be a reality.” An additional gift from a former Southwestern athlete provided funds to run a fiber optic cable to the field. This will allow the University to broad- cast the games live online. Arrrr! PIRATEDATA 17WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu 2,520rolls of tape the athletic training staff uses throughout the year. 1,080gallons of Gatorade consumed annually. 1,750baseballs the Pirates use in one season. $224average cost of a team meal (including coaches, trainers and managers) for the men’s lacrosse team. 3holes-in-one during competition under Coach Dan Ruyle (Kristen Davenport ’09; Ben Thompson ’05; Robert Kneisley ’06) Go to www.southwesternpirates.com for scores, stats and additional information about Pirate Athletics. WANT MORE?
  • 19. academicsinfocus “Through art, we discover the economic condi- tion, the political messages, and the religious traditions of the day.” Including Howe, Southwestern’s Art History Program includes four full-time faculty members— two from Harvard University, one from Yale University and one from the University of Chicago. “We are intentional about building diversity into the curriculum. We want our students to be able to reflect and think critically as they interact with research,” says Kimberly Smith, associate professor of art history, specializing in modern (European) art. Though the department is small, it is 50-50 Western and non-Western in the fields the faculty cover. This is very unusual in any department; thus, the program is well equipped to prepare students for international careers in the world in which this generation of students will live. All four faculty work internationally and are fluent in the language and culture of the countries in which they work: Smith in Germany/Austria, Patrick Hajovsky in Central and South America, Allison Miller in China, and Howe in Italy, where he leads a large archaeological and arts manage- ment project near Pompeii.* “We all feel responsible to give students a global introduction to art history,” adds Hajovsky, associ- ate professor of art history, whose focus is Latin American art and who is currently researching and writing a book on Montezuma, within an Aztec context. Miller, assistant professor of art history, is the newest member of the department. She says, “Art history is an anchor for studying history in “Prior to innovation, one needs a huge depth of knowledge.” —Thomas Noble Howe he study of art history at Southwestern exposes students to high-quality historical and expe- riential learning, all framed by the perspective of a broader liberal arts education. The art history major consists of six broad areas of study—East Asian, Latin American, pre- modern (classical and medieval), early modern (renaissance and baroque), modern and design history—and is a scholarly discipline that enables students to develop visual literacy and critically assess the complex meanings of material culture within diverse settings. Thomas Howe, professor of art and art history and holder of the Herman Brown Chair, says that art history in particular is a rigorous and demanding degree program at Southwestern. “Our students become visually literate, learn to speak rationally about the irrational and to back up their assertions with research and evidence.” He adds, “We teach that art can and often should be considered using a broad, contextual approach.” By studying art objects in relation to contemporaneous political and historical events, students may learn about the philosophy, religion, history, politics, class structure and more of the time period. By studying the aesthetics, one learns that objects, works, images and architecture are tied in intricate ways to the culture. Howe explains,  Assistant Professor of Art History Allison Miller leads students in the examination of an East Asian handscroll facsimile. photos by Shelley Dormont ’11 19WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu The rigorous and demanding Art History major at Southwestern
  • 20. academicsinfocus environment.” For those who choose a career path other than in the arts, experience shows that they still carry their love of and knowledge about art with them. TODAY’S WORLD Howe goes on to discuss the future of research in a small, liberal arts school like Southwestern, explaining, “In the ‘Flat World’ of Thomas Friedman**, technology allows both faculty and students to work at an ambitious international level, which I foresee leading to an evolution of researchers heading to smaller colleges … espe- cially those who enjoy teaching at the undergradu- ate level as we do.” Working nationally and internationally allows faculty to help students with networking opportu- nities both in the U.S. and abroad. Many art history students—about one half to three fourths—study abroad as part of their Southwestern Experience. In summer 2010, now senior Georgia LoSchiavo and Katherine Maples ’10 traveled to Italy with Howe to work on an ancient garden. More than 2,000 years old and possibly the largest well-preserved formal garden ever found, the garden was located in the ancient Roman city of Stabiae that was buried with the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79. Howe has been leading excavations at Stabiae since 1999. general … art makes history come alive!” Fluent in Mandarin Chinese, Japanese and Latin, Miller’s specialty is East Asian art. She says she enjoys observing her students as they discover that East Asian art is “more than Mulan.” The art history major offers excellent prepara- tion for any field requiring critical thinking, broad cultural knowledge, and research and writing skills. In addition to preparing students for Master of Arts and Ph.D. programs in art history, it is an appropriate major for work in other areas of the visual arts or in other academic disciplines like history or philosophy. Howe says, “Art history is also great preparation for fields such as law, business or medicine.” Senior art history major Kelly Johnson adds, “Studying art history provides the opportunity to learn a little bit about everything. Because art engages with culture throughout history in so many different ways, the discipline has the poten- tial to tap into theory, science, politics, identity, religion, technology and on and on.” Because the current generation of students will most likely change careers three or four times, Howe says, “One of the most important things about a liberal arts education is that it allows you to change direction, taking your previous training into your next … no one will be better prepared than a student who is educated in a liberal arts  Professor of Art History Thomas Howe says it is important for faculty to care for students while giving them more and more independence. 20 Southwestern Magazine
  • 21. academicsinfocus Here in the U.S., one of the most successful off-campus opportunities for Southwestern students, according to Howe, has been the New York Arts Program, a full-semester, full-credit program, which introduces students to the world of established art and media professionals and organizations in New York City. Southwestern participants have been accepted to internships with such prestigious organizations as Sotheby’s, the Metropolitan Museum, Carnegie Hall and Rockefeller Center, where they begin network- ing for their future careers. Johnson, for example, participated in the program and interned at the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum and the Whitney Museum of American Art. She says of the experience, “my education definitely prepared me for the working art world.” A number of Southwestern art history majors have found positions in the area of cultural management, for which they are well-prepared, thanks to their ability to learn a foreign language, their understanding of culture and history, and their ability to write and communicate well and to recognize important issues. One such alumnus, Albert Bui ’06, went on to earn a Master of Industrial Design degree at the Rhode Island School of Design. He has since worked for DMX, an environmental branding company in Austin, and for Berlin Cameron United, a creative advertising agency in New York. He currently freelances as a branding strategist for small, start-up companies. Other alumni have found positions such as assis- tant to the creative director for Vogue magazine; chief registrar and manager of collections for West Point Museum, tenure-track professor at Susquehanna University, and post-doctoral fellow for the Center for World Heritage Research at the University of Florida. FACULTY ROLE Howe explains that the art world is a difficult one to break into. “We (the Southwestern art history faculty) are gatekeepers to that world. It may seem harsh at times, but it is our job to prepare our students for that intense but privi- leged world. We care for our students, but feel strongly that it is important to give them more and more independence and ‘push them out of the nest’ so they are ready for that world.” Alumni like Bui agree that they were very well prepared at Southwestern. “The transition from Southwestern to graduate work was almost seam- less,” Bui says. “My writing abilities were quite strong compared to my peers and I was able to flush out large passages of critical text with confi- dence.” Even as a student, Johnson also agrees. She says, “I’m considering pursuing a career as a museum curator, but wherever I end up after graduation, I can use my critical thinking and writing skills developed (at Southwestern) in any job situation.” Bui adds that he owes much of his design editing eye to Howe, as well as Professor of Art Patrick Veerkamp. “Thanks to them, my ability to read emotional symbolism from visual and physical form is priceless and I incorporate this skill into every moment of my design work.” He advises current students to “Be fearless! Keep your eyes open and trust your point of view … observations of the world—especially human— will come in handy and you’ll get paid for it!” * With an international reputation as an architectural historian (ancient and modern), architectural design teacher, archaeologist (Greek and Roman), art historian (Greek, Roman, post-Modern) and cultural properties manager of “archaeological parks,” Howe has, for the past decade, been coordinator general of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation near Pompeii, Italy, serving as chief coordinator of archaeology and architectural planning. (Visit http://www.stabiae.com/fountation_site/usa/ index.html for more information.) ** Thomas Friedman was Southwestern’s 2012 Shilling Lecturer. (See Page 29 or visit www.southwestern.edu/about/shilling for more information.) “Art history is an anchor for studying history in general … art makes history come alive!” 21WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu
  • 22. Each year, a committee of Southwestern alumni collects recommendations from the SU community and selects a number of their peers to receive annual Alumni Awards. The Association of Southwestern University Alumni hosts an awards presentation during Homecoming and Reunion Weekend. Colleagues, friends and family members contribute to the citations that are read to the recipients during the presentation. portraits by Lance Holt alumni awards Southwestern 2011 22 Southwestern Magazine
  • 23. For her dedication to those in need, for her commitment to personal values that serve to help others, and for her ability to restore the term “politician” to its best definition—one who serves the public—The Association of Southwestern University Alumni proudly presented Joan with the 2011 Distinguished Humanitarian Award. Joan Bray ’67 Distinguished Humanitarian Award The Distinguished Humanitarian Award is presented to alumni who have made a global impact on the human race by their actions while exemplifying Southwestern University’s Core Purpose, which encourages “contribut- ing to the well-being of humanity.” “Most everything Joan Bray does has the well- being of humanity at its core,” say her friends and colleagues. A champion in the effort to elect more women to public office, Joan established herself as a formidable player in the Missouri State House of Representatives. Subsequently elected to the Missouri State Senate, she continued her advocacy for those in need on a local, statewide and even national level. Joan is known for practicing what she preaches and “walking the talk,” particularly in the area of public transportation. So dedicated to the cause, a fellow senator gave her the nickname “Iron Wheels.” With a reputation as a no-nonsense, fiscally conservative Democrat, Joan is known for her willingness to represent her values in a some- times hostile political environment, unafraid to defy the majority if need be. As an outspoken legislator, she dedicated her life’s work to human rights and equality. The words humble, warm and caring have been used to describe Joan’s character, as well as driven, high-energy and laser-focused. Many colleagues have a strong respect for Joan’s views, even when they are in opposition to their own. She is admired for her tireless years of advocacy, diplomacy and leadership, as well as for her gift of seeing both the big picture and the details of an issue, and her ability to confront brutal facts with compassion and honesty. Joan’s commitment to the truth and respect for all has enabled her to work with colleagues across the aisle to accomplish her priorities. Colleagues consider her to be helpful, reliable and someone who can be counted on to represent her constitu- ents to the best of her ability. Widely regarded as a competent, principled and effective Senator, Joan has been a role model and mentor to many. “Joan’s commitment to the truth and respect for all has enabled her to work with colleagues across the aisle to accomplish her priorities.” 23WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu WANT MORE? For more information about The Association of Southwestern University Alumni, visit www.sualumni.net
  • 24. he became Medical Director of Angelo Clinic Association and then Medical Director of Shannon Health System. Dan genuinely cares about others and always focuses on helping patients have healthy, happy, productive lives. Over the years, he began assum- ing leadership roles and, because he also cares about issues facing the community and the country, chose to pursue a business degree from the University of North Carolina. He became Chief Medical Officer and then CEO of Shannon Health System prior to his appointment to the THA. In the five years since taking the helm at the THA, Dan has influenced state and federal health care policy, developed a strong public educa- tion program regarding the need for health care reform, established a hospital physician executives program, and served on the American Hospital Association Regional Policy Board. With a long-standing connection to Southwestern—his uncle, Durwood Fleming, was Southwestern’s 12th president—Dan has recently become Vice Chair of the newly formed Science Center Advisory Council and a member of the University’s Board of Visitors. Energetic, optimistic, compassionate, creative, diligent and trustworthy, Dan is known to be a leader and an inspiration to others, includ- ing his wife, Alice Schorre Stultz ’72, whom he met at Southwestern, his three children, John, James and Lisa Stultz-Bleakley ’98, and his five grandchildren. For his interest in others both profession- ally and personally, for his willingness to take responsibility for his actions while considering the views of others, and for being a great example of the Southwestern Experience, The Association of Southwestern University Alumni presented Dan with the 2011 Distinguished Professional Award. Dan Stultz ’72 Distinguished Professional Award The Distinguished Professional Award is presented to Southwestern alumni who have performed exceptional civic and/or professional services in a given geographic area or field of endeavor. Recipients represent the highest standards and exemplify the University’s Core Values. As a practicing physician for 28 years and now the President and CEO of the 475-member Texas Hospital Association (THA), Dr. Dan Stultz is a life- long learner and a shining example of the liberal arts experience. Friends agree that he is the “whole package” both personally and professionally, and that his Southwestern Experience as an athlete and pre-med student was integral to preparing him for success in both medicine and business. After graduating from Southwestern, Dan went on to The University of Texas Medical School in Houston and completed his residency at the University of Kentucky. His career in internal medicine began in 1978 in San Angelo, where “Energetic, optimistic, compassionate, creative, diligent and trustworthy, Dan is known to be a leader and an inspiration to others.” 24 Southwestern Magazine
  • 25. Marjorie Stripling Schultz ’70 Distinguished Southwestern Service Award The Distinguished Southwestern Service Award is presented to an alumna/us who serves the University over a long period of time; serves his or her community, state and nation, and is a leader in his or her chosen profession, business or vocation. As one of four sisters who attended Southwestern, as well as the wife of an alumnus —Al Schultz ’71—it is not surprising that Southwestern has had an enduring presence in the life of Marjorie Stripling Shultz. But, she has also had an enduring presence and influence in the life of Southwestern. Over the years, Marjorie has “Been Southwestern” as a member of the Development Committee and the Campaign Cabinet, as well as an Alumni Board Officer and a member of the Board of Trustees. In addition, her service to Southwestern has included being a member of both the Brown Society and the 1840 Society. A partner in the Houston law firm that bears her name, Marjorie is board certified in estate planning and probate law, and is the long-standing Chair of the Planned Giving Council. She and Al have shown their support and love of Southwestern by funding several annual scholarships. She has also worked for the past decade as pro bono counsel for the University’s Office of Planned Giving to help advance Southwestern’s mission. Always thoughtful and interested in the people with whom she speaks, Marjorie has provided professional services of the highest caliber and has shared her wisdom and talents with the alumni and friends interested in naming the University as a beneficiary in their estate plans. President Jake B. Schrum ’68 says, “As an expert estate attorney, Marjorie has continuously been willing to share her professional experience with alumni and friends of Southwestern, helping the University become the beneficiary of significant commitments. In the simplest terms, Marjorie facilitates our ability to provide the Southwestern Experience to future generations.” Respected for her legal prowess and invalu- able counsel to the University as a whole and to individual donors, Marjorie is also appreciated for her straightforwardness and generosity, which goes beyond simply writing a check, to support- ing a cause or an organization about which she cares deeply. It is for her commitment to those with whom she works, for her extraordinary energy and forth- rightness in all areas, as well as for her devotion and service to the University, that The Association of Southwestern University Alumni proudly presented Marjorie with the 2011 Distinguished Southwestern Service Award. “Always thoughtful and interested in the people with whom she speaks, Marjorie provides professional services of the highest caliber.” 25WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu
  • 26. Friends and colleagues say that Sylvia’s intelli- gence, energy, vibrancy, charisma, grace and poise are continuously growing and thriving … and that there is nothing she can’t achieve. In fact, in the 10 years since graduating from Southwestern, Sylvia has already had an active career in the areas of sales, communications, research, marketing, project management, instructional design, public affairs, fundraising and grassroots advocacy. As a student, Sylvia worked tirelessly to promote the common good of the student body and always stood up for what was right. She and her class- mates also helped revive the “spirit” of the late J. Samuel Barcus, Class of 1890, who served as Southwestern’s first alumnus president from 1924–1928. Thanks to Sylvia, Barcus now has the opportunity to make late night visits to the library and guest appearances at SING! Continuing her service to Southwestern as an alumna, Sylvia has been an Annual Giving Board Member, a member of both her 5- and 10-Year Reunion Planning Committees, and the Communications Chair of the Greater Georgetown Association of Southwestern Alumni. Because of her work ethic and positive atti- tude, Sylvia stands out in a crowd. With a sense of fairness and constant thirst for the truth, Sylvia is never one to say “Don’t confuse me with the facts.” Prior to her current professional position as Technical Trainer with Harte-Hanks, she was the Coalitions Director for the Texans for Kay Bailey Hutchison organization. Senator Hutchison has said, “Sylvia’s time at Southwestern has had a profound influence on shaping the committed, dedicated person she is today.” For her strength and conviction, for her enthusi- astic and positive attitude, and for always thinking of others first, The Association of Southwestern University Alumni presented Sylvia with the 2011 Distinguished Young Alumna Award. Sylvia Mayer, ’01 Distinguished Young Alumna Award The Distinguished Young Alumna Award is presented to Southwestern University students who have gradu- ated in the last 10 years and whose achievements in the civic and/or professional realm set a standard of excellence. Recipients represent Southwestern’s finest young alumni and the University’s commitment to a values-centered curriculum and development of the whole person. When Sylvia Mayer enters a room, every one knows it! Described as a beacon of light, Sylvia has long worked to support others and encourage them to have a positive outlook, and is known for being motivated not by accolades or awards, but solely by what she stands for. “As a student, Sylvia worked tirelessly to promote the common good of the student body and always stood up for what was right.” 26 Southwestern Magazine
  • 27. Pamela Gregory Rossman, ’72 Ms. Homecoming Award The Mr./Ms. Homecoming Award is an honor bestowed upon a member of the Southwestern University faculty as a token of the affection and respect of former students. The award carries special meaning to the recipient, as it symbolizes the strength of the University: the strong, personal relationships between students and faculty, clearly indicating that alumni recall with apprecia- tion the contributions of the recipient to the students’ education and development. In her 28 years of service to Southwestern, Pam Rossman has taught piano, accompanied the University Chorale, and has been the Chapel Organist and its Music Coordinator. Pam’s colleagues say that she helps make their jobs “pure joy.” Described as kind, generous, gifted and caring, friends and fellow alumni agree that Pam’s undying support of Southwestern, along with her quiet confidence and integrity, make her a wonderful example of teachers who make a difference. While a student at Southwestern, Pam met and later married Mike Rossman ’73, Southwestern’s director of admission. Mike describes Pam as loving, committed, spiritual and passionate about music and says that she carries the mark of Southwestern teachers like Drusilla Huffmaster Anderson and others who came before her. Pam has always understood the power of music to impact people. Using her love of classical music to express her spirituality, Pam plays the organ in a way that has brought many people both to tears and to levels of great joy, all with a sense of reverence. She is also able to identify and call forth students whose musical gifts, used in a public way, contribute to the lifting of others’ spirits. Pam’s belief that good music is worth the effort it takes to perform is proven by her rigorous prac- tice routine. But she’s not all music all the time. She also enjoys drinking her coffee and water- ing her flowers in the morning—when the water levels at Lake Georgetown allow it—as well as her three crazy dachshunds, who allow Pam and Mike to share their home. For her commitment to uplifting the Southwestern community and to making a differ- ence in the lives of so many people in such a profound and memorable and musical way, The Association of Southwestern University Alumni presented Pam with its highest honor bestowed upon faculty, the 2011 Ms. Homecoming Award. “Described as kind, generous, gifted and caring, friends and fellow alumni agree that Pam is a wonderful example of teachers who make a difference.” 27WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu
  • 28. The 34th annual Brown Symposium, Back to the Foodture: Sustainable Strategies to Reverse a Global Crisis, was held on Southwestern’s campus Feb. 27–28, 2012. Developed by Laura Hobgood-Oster, profes- sor of religion, the Symposium’s topic was food—a celebration of food culture. “Bountiful food is celebration, creative food is art, particular foods mark cultures, lack of food is deadly. Food is so central to who and what we are that we, too often, take it for granted. But many humans are not afforded this luxury,” she says. “Now, we find ourselves at the brink of a poten- tial crisis. A growing human population coupled with food production practices that are potentially devastating for the environment, other animals and human health (factory farming, monoculture, intensive agriculture) threaten life in many forms —both human life and entire ecosystems.” This year’s Brown Symposium considered food from many angles and pondered ways we can rethink our relationship with this most basic, beautiful and complex of needs. Featured speakers included: Richard Wilk, Indiana University; Winona LaDuke, Honor the Earth; Amie Breeze Harper, University of California, Davis; Wayne Pacelle, Humane Society of the United States; and Jo Luck, Heifer Project International. Hobgood-Oster explains that Symposium partic- ipants learned that there are differences in food culture around the world. The food culture in the U.S. is “unsustainable and unhealthy, and now we’re exporting this culture.” She says this is not something to fear, but to be aware of. “We need to sustain appropriate food cultures and, unfor- tunately, agriculture is the enemy of biodiversity.” Participants also learned about new ways of producing all kinds of food which are better for humans, animals and the environment, and that the healthiest diets in the world (Mediterranean, SE Asian) don’t consist of all the same foods, but include a wide variety of local foods. As part of the Symposium, Patrick Veerkamp, professor of art, co-curated an art exhibit titled “Culinary Cultures: A Ceramics Perspective.” In addition, Bruce Cain and David Asbury, associate and assistant professors of music respectfully, performed a concert titled “River of Words,” featuring a special piece commissioned for the Symposium. There was also a farmer’s market and a canned food drive. Hobgood-Oster encouraged partici- pants to read the labels and be thoughtful about the foods they donated. The Brown Symposium is presented by Southwestern University on an annual basis. Open to the public without charge, the Symposium is funded through an endowment established by The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston for professorships at the University. Brown Symposium Goes Back to the Foodture Illustration by Nick Ramos 28 Southwestern Magazine behind the lectern
  • 29. Dave Eggers, author of six books and the founder of and editor for McSweeney’s, an inde- pendent publishing house based in San Francisco, was the 2011 visiting author in The Writer’s Voice Series sponsored by the A. Frank Smith, Jr. Library Center. Eggers’ best-selling book, A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius, was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction. His 2006 novel, What is the What, won the 2009 Prix Médicis for best foreign work of fiction and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Award for Fiction. His most recent work, Zeitoun, is a nonfiction account of a Syrian-American immigrant and his extraor- dinary experience during Hurricane Katrina. Eggers spoke on November 1 to students, faculty, staff and the public in a full-to-capacity Alma Thomas Theater. In reaction, sophomore Jacob Brown said, “Eggers is a perfect fit for Southwestern. He not only stands for lifelong learning in his range of interests … but he’s also dedicated to civic duty—changing the world for the better.” Discussing his writing as well as his passion for helping others, Eggers specifically shared his expe- rience with 826 Valencia, a nonprofit writing and More than 2,000 gathered to hear the 2012 Shilling Lecture speaker, Thomas Friedman, foreign affairs columnist for The New York Times. Friedman has won three Pulitzer Prizes, and according to Foreign Policy magazine, “Friedman doesn’t just report on events; he helps shape them.” Vanity Fair called him “the country’s best newspaper columnist,” and he has been named one of “America’s Best Leaders” by U.S. News & World Report. Friedman’s most recent book, That Used to Be Us: How America Fell Behind in the World We Invented and How We Can Come Back is about the major challenges facing the U.S., the reason the country is not addressing those challenges effectively, and the policies America needs to adopt to ensure prosperity at home and strength abroad in the 21st century. His book Hot, Flat and Crowded: Why We Need a Green Revolution — and How It Can Renew America, was a #1 New York Times bestseller, and his previous bestseller, The World is Flat, has sold more than four million copies. Other bestselling books by Friedman include Longitudes and Attitudes: The World in the Age of Terrorism, The Lexus and the Olive Tree and From Beirut to Jerusalem, which serves as a basic text on the Middle East in colleges and universities nationwide and won the National Book Award. The Roy and Margaret Shilling Lecture Series, endowed in 1999 by The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, to honor Southwestern’s 13th president, Roy B. Shilling Jr., and his wife, Margaret, brings to campus internationally prominent speakers on topics relating to ethics, public service and public policy. The 2012 lecture was sponsored in part by Sodexo. Emi Anderson, Class of 2013, said “As a political science major, having Thomas Friedman come to speak was one of the most exciting things that could happen. Whether you agree with his viewpoints or not, being engaged in the ... discussion is a valuable experience.” That Used to Be Us... The Shilling Lecture welcomed New York Times foreign affairs columnist and Pulitzer Prize winner Thomas Friedman Eggers Promotes Storytelling, Giving Back tutoring center for youth in the Mission District of San Francisco, which he co-founded in 2002 with Nínive Calegari. Local communities have since opened sister 826 centers in Chicago, Los Angeles, Brooklyn, Ann Arbor, Seattle, Washington, D.C. and Boston. For his work, Eggers received the 2007 Heinz Award in the Arts and Humanities, was named in 2010 to Poets and Writers magazine’s list of the “Fifty Most Inspiring Authors in the World,” and was one of the winners of the 31st annual American Book Awards, given for literary works that cover “the entire spectrum of America’s diverse literary community.” 29WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu
  • 30. This is a story of the American dream and the dark currents that threaten to drown it in a mili- tarized and extra-legal America after 9/11. Zeitoun illuminates the experience of the 2005 flood that followed Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans in a way that takes us far from the scenes of devastation in the Lower Ninth Ward and chaos in the convention center. In this book, we see the flood through the eyes of a successful small- business owner, Abdulrahman Zeitoun, a Syrian immigrant paddling through the city in his canoe trying to help his neighbors while his American- born wife, Kathy, and their children worry about him from safe havens inland. They worry even more when he seems to disappear without a trace as he finds himself incarcerated with no access to lawyers, courts or phones. That anyone had such experiences—not to mention that tens of thousands of poor people were simply abandoned to the storm and flood—is deeply unnerving to those of us who want to believe that our country is decisively different from say, authoritarian Syria. At first, Dave Eggers’ tale of Zeitoun in the flood seems like a grand adventure. When the storm waters first recede, then begin to rise rapidly around his house (bringing the realization that some levees must have failed), Zeitoun takes charge of his situation, camping out on the roof of his garage and feeding neighbors’ dogs. As he begins to paddle around his neighborhood in his canoe, his quiet approach enables him to hear the distress cries of trapped neighbors and rescue them, even as military parties speed by in fan boats, hearing nothing and stopping for nothing. But then this romantic tale takes a darkly tragic turn. Zeitoun, a Syrian friend, a tenant and another Zeitoun by Dave Eggers // New York: Vintage Books, 2009 review by Thomas McClendon, Professor of History man are roughly arrested (for no reason they can discern) at one of his rental properties. They soon find themselves incarcerated in cages erected on the bare asphalt in a hastily converted bus station: Camp Greyhound. The look of the place reminded Zeitoun of nothing so much as pictures he had seen of Guantanamo Bay. While guards, some of them veterans of Iraq or Afghanistan, accuse Zeitoun and his fellow immigrant of being “Al Qaeda,” and taunt them with pork-based MRE meals, no formal charges are brought, and they are not allowed to make a phone call or to see a lawyer. Their transfer, a few days later, to a Louisiana prison brings the expectation that a more orderly process will emerge, but in fact the nightmare continues. A chance encounter with a missionary, who phones Kathy at Zeitoun’s request, leads eventually to Zeitoun’s release, after more than three weeks of incarceration. Zeitoun focuses our attention on two very important American stories. One is the story of Hurricane Katrina’s flood, a product of govern- ment neglect of critical infrastructure and failure to rescue citizens left stranded in the city as a result or their poverty or infirmity. The other is a story of the dark forces that have undermined the rule of law in America since 9/11. It tells us a great deal indeed about what has gone wrong with America. Eggers and the Zeitouns have since established the Zeitoun Foundation “to aid in the rebuilding of New Orleans and to promote respect for human rights in the United States and around the world.” I urge you to read this book and to contribute to the foundation. 30 Southwestern Magazine engaging find
  • 31. Be Southwestern! 31WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu Dear Southwestern University Alumni, As my term as president of The Association of Southwestern University Alumni draws to a close, I encourage you to view your relationship with The Association and Southwestern as reciprocal. If you will, the value of that relationship will increase. Take advantage of what The Association has to offer you personally and professionally. You not only have a great education on which to build your life, you have an extraordinary network of alumni to draw on for friendships, career connections, advice, intel- lectual inquiry and conversation. In turn, you can help other alumni, Southwestern students and your alma mater by “Being Southwestern” wherever you are. Here are five areas on which I urge you to focus: I. Alumni Leadership Development and Recognition • Help identify potential leaders. • Mentor young alumni. • Share the accomplishments of alumni you know. II. Relational Connections • Plan informal gatherings of SU alumni. • Get involved with a local association, your class reunion or an alumni connection group. III. Professional Networking • Identify potential employers and promote job openings. • Consider sponsoring a Southwestern internship at your workplace. IV. Visibility and Recruitment • Refer prospective students to Southwestern. V. Support Southwestern • Give a portion of your time, talents and financial support to Southwestern. Southwestern is truly a lifelong experience. I have been serving Southwestern in various capacities since I graduated. I have given and I have received through this relationship. It is satisfying when you can help shape the future of an institution that helped shape you, and rewarding to develop fulfilling personal and professional relationships. It has been an honor to serve as your president. Be Southwestern. Steve A. Raben ’63 President, The Association of Southwestern University Alumni Association of Southwestern University Alumni The Alumni Association Mission To be a community that fosters a lifelong Southwestern Experience by: spanning generations and geographies, connecting ideas and individuals, inspiring learning and service, inviting diverse perspectives and strengthening loyalties so that The Association becomes vital in the lives of alumni and their University. Alumni Council 2009–2011 Steve Raben ’63 President Blake Stanford ’81 President-Elect Nisa Sharma ’92 Class Relations Chair The Rev. Dr. Paul Barton ’83 Nominations and Awards Chair Sarah Walthall Norris ’68 Homecoming and Reunions Chair Maxie Duran Hardin ’73 Local Associations Chair Katherine Merrill Andre ’99 Alumni Connection Groups Chair The Rev. Milton Jordan ’62 Assembly Program Chair Yesenia Garcia ’03 Assembly Program Chair-Elect Lisa Dreishmire ’91 Alumni Communications Chair Ken Holley ’71 Lifelong Learning Chair John Dapper ’91 At-Large Member Theodore Caryl ’76 At-Large Member John Curry ’70 Trustee Representative Zoe Martin ’12 Student Representative
  • 32. During Student and Parent Orientation in August, Southwestern welcomed 22 legacy students among the 2011 first-year and transfer class. They are pictured here with their relative who is a Southwestern alumna/us. If you have a relative, friend or other student whom you think would be a great addition to the Southwestern family, please complete the Refer a Student form at: http://www.southwestern.edu/referastudent. 32 Southwestern Magazine alumni news 7STOPS2007 graduates Dustin Coates, Meagan Elliott and Josh Franco recently founded an online magazine called 7STOPS. Each month, they publish seven long-form, fiction and non-fiction articles which are variations on a theme and include perspectives from all over the world. Several Southwestern alumni have already contributed. Elliot says, “7STOPS is essentially our liberal arts education in magazine form.” To read the latest issue or to find out how to submit an article, visit: www.7stopsmag.com Homecoming and Reunion weekend 2011AT A GLANCE Number of alumni attendees (topping last year’s record of 1,085) Total number of attendees (again, breaking last year’s record high of 1,514) Class Reunions Homecoming Cup Champion 2011 was the inaugural year for the Homecoming Cup, sponsored by Student Foundation, in which student organizations/groups enter to participate in the Homecoming Parade, Capture the Cup and SING!, accumulating points for each event. The organization/ group with the most points by the end of the weekend wins the Homecoming Cup. SING! Winner Best float in the Homecoming Parade Capture the Cup Winner 1,099 1,537THIRTEEN DELTADELTADELTA ZETA TAU ALPHA PI KAPPA ALPHA DELTA DELTA DELTA
  • 33. 33WINTER 2012 www.southwestern.edu Over the past five years, Southwestern has more than doubled the amount of need-based financial aid it offers to students ($6.5 million). Unfortunately, the demonstrated financial need of Southwestern students and their families has increased by $10 million. We hope you are able to help Southwestern close the gap between student need and what the University can provide. The return on an investment in a Southwestern student can be exponential. Every Gift Matters. Please visit www.southwestern.edu/giving to learn more about students like Student Body President Brady Kent, and support Southwestern scholarships.
  • 34. The Original Social Network // The following Class Notes were submitted Jan. 8, 2011 through Aug. 31, 2011. Share your accom- plishments, achievements and life milestones with friends and classmates! Submit your Class Note by visiting www.sualumni.net. Select “Connect” from the main menu, then “Class Notes.” You may also e-mail your Class Note to alumni@southwestern.edu. 1948 Robert Coleman, Wilmore, Ky., celebrated his 60th wedding anniversary to Marietta with his family in the summer of 2010. Robert retired from the Billy Graham Seminary, but continues teaching as an adjunct professor at Asbury Theological Seminary and was a visiting professor at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. He has written more than 20 books, many of which have been translated into multiple languages. Still involved in preaching and pastor schools, he served as dean of pastor schools for the Billy Graham Seminary which has schools all over the world. 1961 Mary Louise Meyers Gulley, Houston, was installed in May 2011 as the Regent of the George Washington Chapter (Galveston) of the Daughters of the American Revolution for the 2011-2013 term. The George Washington Chapter was formed June 17, 1895, as the first D.A.R. chapter in Texas. 1967 JonMorrison,Socorro, N.M., runs the Old Prospect’s Bakery. In addition to baking and selling artisan sour- dough and yeast breads, he sells cinnamon rolls at 1976 Laurence Musgrove, San Angelo, has written a book titled Handmade Thinking: A Picture Book on Reading and Drawing. He is a professor and head of the department of English and modern languages at Angelo State University. 1980 Kathleen MacLean Ragsdale, Weir, is the Environmental and Conservation Services Director for the City of Georgetown, and was named the 2010 Manager of the Year for the city. 1981 Vicki Pierce Stroeher, Huntington, W.Va., is an associate professor of music at Marshall University. She is an expert on 20th century English composer Benjamin Britten (1913-1976). She was invited to present her paper “’Without Any Tune’: The Role of the Discursive Shift in Britten’s Interpretation of Poetry” at the Literary Britten Conference in Sept. 2011 at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom. During the same month, Vicki and two colleagues made transcriptions and conducted research toward a volume of correspondence his local farmer’s market using a recipe from the old Southwestern Student Union Building from the 1960s. He says, “Smelling them bake brings me back to the old SUB and Southwestern.” Ken Peters, Georgetown, has retired as pastor of New Braunfels Presbyterian Church after 25 years of ministry. Prior to becoming a clergyman, Ken taught history at Texas A&M University for seven years. He and his wife, Marilyn, have recently relocated to Georgetown. 1975 Randy Mitchmore, Houston, has been elected Chairman of the Board of Trustees for the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry’s Charitable Foundation. The foundation’s main program is to help (at no cost) survivors of domestic violence who have had their smile damaged from abuse. Leading a nationwide network of volunteer dentists and laboratories, Give Back a Smile has a vision of “Restore a Smile, Restore a Life.” For more information, visit: http://www.aacd.com/index. php?module=cms&page=610 Reunion Years 34 Southwestern Magazine class notes Dr. Timothy Boone ’77, Houston, was elected the president of the American Board of Urology to serve a term from January 2011 through December 2012. His role as president is to oversee the process of certification and recertifi- cation to practice urology in America, protecting the best interests of the public. Since 2000, Boone has been Chief of Urology at Methodist Hospital and is a senior member of the Texas Methodist Hospital Research Institute (TMHRI), where he is conducting multiple clinical trials dealing with urology problems— from new drugs to devices. His main focus is on neurologic disorders affecting the bladder-like spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis. Boone also maintains a clinical professor appointment at Baylor College of Medicine, where he teaches urology residents, and participates on a weekly basis in a basic science labora- tory that he started at Baylor more than 10 years ago. A biology major at Southwestern, Boone says that Southwestern helped prepare him for his current professional position through one-on-one instruction, especially in physiology. Setting his sights on medicine at Southwestern, Boone was an early M.D./Ph.D. student at The University of Texas at Houston. He says, “I preferred the lab and research projects so graduate studies appealed to me more than medical school classes.” Boone is glad to be able now to “give back” to Southwestern students by helping coordinate and foster interaction between Southwestern and TMHRI for research and education. (See Page 10 for more information on Southwestern’s collaboration with TMHRI.) He believes that new science center at Southwestern is a “must” for recruiting and educating students who have a lot of choices and are very discerning. He says it will also help keep good faculty. “A university is only as good as its faculty who are engaged in teaching and are up to date in their field.” Boone and his wife, Angela, have four children. Their daughters, Christie and Blair, live in North Texas, where Christie is finishing a physics degree and Blair has her student teaching experience remaining before she starts in elementary education. Their son, Bolton, is a first-year student at Baylor, and son, Connor, is a sophomore in high school. Still closely connected to the University, Boone’s uncle was Southwestern’s 12th president, Durwood Fleming, and his cousin is Dan Stultz ’72. (See page 24.)