Rcc new briefing 10 21-10

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Rcc new briefing 10 21-10

  1. 1. HEADLINES The Mystery of the Murdered Marine WOMEN AT ARMS A Peril in War Zones: Sexual Abuse by Fellow G.I.’s By STEVEN LEE MYERS Published: December 27, 2009 Futenma dispute strains ties with Japan Military Academy in compliance with sex assault prevention program Published: Monday, December 28, 2009
  2. 2. “Recruiter jailed in sex assault”
  3. 3. Pensacola News Journal “Eglin officer convicted of rape”
  4. 4. “Sex Assault Reports Rise in Military”
  5. 5. “US rape: The private war of women Soldiers”
  6. 6. “Marine Convicted of Rape in Philippines”
  7. 7. “For Female Soldiers, Sexual Assault Remains a Danger”
  8. 8. “Court sentences U.S. Soldier to four-year jail term for rape”
  9. 9. “Benning Soldiers charged with rape”
  10. 10. “Army reservist’s report of sexual assault under investigation”
  11. 11. “AFA cadets face charges of indecent assault, drugs”
  12. 12. “Women Soldiers Do Not Feel Protected by Pentagon”
  13. 13. “The aftermath of sex abuse in military”
  14. 14. “Soldier gets one year for aggravated assault”
  15. 15. KLVTV “Military Shame: Sexual Assault Reports Up 24 Percent”
  16. 16. “Rape Inquiry on Navy Ship”
  17. 17. HEADLINES The Mystery of the Murdered Marine WOMEN AT ARMS A Peril in War Zones: Sexual Abuse by Fellow G.I.’s By STEVEN LEE MYERS Published: December 27, 2009 Futenma dispute strains ties with Japan Military Academy in compliance with sex assault prevention program Published: Monday, December 28, 2009
  18. 18. RCC Training and Quality Assurance Conference Dr. Kaye Whitley Director
  19. 19. Objectives • Define “sexual assault” and “consent” within the Department of Defense • Articulate the different reporting options: Unrestricted and Restricted • Recognize the members of the Sexual Assault Response Team • Assess how to utilize resources to prevent sexual assault and support victims 19
  20. 20. Overview • Introduction • History, DoD Policy and Program • Reporting Options • Victim Support • Current Statistics • Prevention Efforts • Additional Resources 20
  21. 21. Who am I?
  22. 22. Why is this Briefing important to You? • Sexual Assault Disclosure • Policy • Victim care and support • RCCs – Integral part of the system • Case Example 22
  23. 23. Overview • Introduction • History, DoD Policy and Program • Reporting Options • Victim Support • Current Statistics • Prevention Efforts • Additional Resources 23
  24. 24. Milestones Sec. Rumsfeld Directs Review of JTF-SAPR Restricted Reporting DoDI 1St SAAC DoD-wide Strategic Treatment and Care Established Implemented Signed Convenes Plan & Oversight of SA Victims Framework Feb 04 Apr 04 Oct 04 Jan 05 Jun 05 Oct 05 Jun 06 Apr 07 Sep 08 Aug 09 DoDD JTF-SAPR Care for Victims of Comprehensive Signed Prevention Transitions into a Sexual Assault Task SA Policy Permanent Office Strategy Force Report Released Released PROBLEM ID POLICY DEVELOPMENT POLICY IMPLEMENTATION PREVENTION ACCOUNTABILITY 24
  25. 25. DoD Policy It is DoD policy to prevent sexual assault within the Department by establishing a culture of prevention, response, and accountability that enhances the safety and well-being of all DoD members. 25
  26. 26. SAPRO: Part of OSD Secretary of Defense Office of the Secretary of Defense Personnel and Readiness (RSI) SAPRO Department Department Department of the Navy of the Air Force of the Army Army Navy Air Force SHARP SAPR Program SAPR Program Program Marine Corps SAPR Program 26
  27. 27. “Sexual Assault” Training Definition Includes the following: • Rape, forcible sodomy (oral or anal sex), or other unwanted sexual contact that is aggravated, abusive or wrongful, or attempts to commit these acts • Can occur without regard to gender or spousal relationship or age of victim • Intentional sexual contact, characterized by use of force, threats, intimidation or abuse of authority or when the victim does not or cannot consent 27
  28. 28. Consent An expression or lack of consent through words or conduct means there is NO consent.
  29. 29. Consent • Does NOT occur when there is a lack of physical resistance or submission due to the accused’s use of force, threat of force, or placing another person in fear • Is NOT based on the manner of dress of the person involved with the accused • Is NOT based on a current or previous dating relationship by itself 29
  30. 30. Overview • Introduction • History, DoD Policy and Program • Reporting Options: Unrestricted and Restricted • Victim Support • Current Statistics • Prevention Efforts • Additional Resources 30
  31. 31. Unrestricted Report • Command and investigative services notified – Can lead to offender accountability • Allows the victim to receive: – Medical treatment • Sexual Assault Forensic Examination (SAFE) – Advocacy services – Counseling assistance – Legal services • Victims’ Rights – Mandated monthly status reports 31
  32. 32. Restricted Report • Does not trigger the investigative and/or legal process – To address potential physical security issues the senior commander is notified of the case, but not of individual details • Victims have access to medical care, counseling and Chaplain services • Offered Sexual Assault Forensic exam which is maintained for one year • Used 3,640 times since June 2005 – About 10% convert annually 32
  33. 33. Overview • Introduction • History, DoD Policy and Program • Reporting Options • Victim Support • Current Statistics • Prevention Efforts • Additional Resources 33
  34. 34. Sexual Assault Response Team • Sexual Assault Response Coordinators* • Victim Advocates* • Medical and Mental Health Providers* • Chaplains* * Can take Restricted Report • Unit Commanders • Investigators • Judge Advocates 34
  35. 35. Sexual Assault Response Coordinator • Center of gravity for the victim’s case • Coordinates response to victim – Military and civilian • Manages and trains victim advocates • Reports statistics • Serves as program’s link to Command Note: SARC Training • Can take a Restricted report 35
  36. 36. Victim Advocates • Approx. 40 hrs initial training (or more) • Civilian and/or military • Volunteer vs. appointed – In some services, this is a collateral duty • Direct victim support • Present whenever victim requests • Not an attorney or legal advisor • Can take a restricted report 36
  37. 37. Reserve Component Eligibility • Applies to National Guard and Reserve members who are sexually assaulted when performing active service and inactive duty training • Line of Duty (LOD): – Definition: Determines if a member of the Reserve component is eligible for medical care at government expense for an injury or illness – Consideration: Did the event occur or was aggravated while in an activated military duty status – Note: SARCs can approve LODs for sexual assault cases 37
  38. 38. Overview • Introduction • History, DoD Policy and Program • Reporting Options • Victim Support • Current Statistics • Prevention Efforts • Additional Resources 38
  39. 39. Annual Reports of Sexual Assault 3500 3230 2908 3000 2688 Number of Reports 2500 2516 2000 2265 2085 Total Reports to DoD 1500 Unrestricted Reports Reports Remaining Restricted 1000 714 603 643 500 0 FY07 FY08 FY09 Year Total Reports of Sexual Assault, FY07-FY09 39
  40. 40. FY09 Offenses Reported Non-Consensual Sodomy Attempts to 6% Commit Offenses Indecent Assault <1% 1% Wrongful Sexual Rape Contact 31% 22% Offenses reported in Unrestricted Reports opened in FY09. n = 2,516 Abusive Sexual Contact 7% Aggravated Aggravated Sexual Contact Sexual Assault 2% 31% 40
  41. 41. Least Common – Stranger Perpetrator • Bad guy! • Little or no relationship to victim • Uses a weapon • Evidence and/or injury to victim • Evidence at scene • Reported more quickly • Needs to be in jail! These statements are NOT true. They should not be generalized across all sexual assaults. 41
  42. 42. Most Common - Non-stranger Perpetrator • Might be a “good guy” • Relationship with victim • Injury to victim less likely • Evidence at scene less conclusive • Reported more slowly • “Nice guy having fun” 42
  43. 43. The Majority of Reports • 18 – 24 years old • Male on female • Junior Enlisted (E1 – E4) • Non-Stranger • Off duty • Alcohol *DoD Annual Report on Sexual Assault in the Military, 2008 *DMDC Gender Relations Survey, 2006 43
  44. 44. Goal: Close the Gap Survey Reporting (Prevalence) Prevention Reports of Sexual Assault Goal: Narrow Reporting Gap Reporting Reports to DoD Authorities 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 44
  45. 45. Unwanted Sexual Contact In 2006 AC Gender Relations Survey • 6.8% of women • 1.8% of men – Only 22% of those women and 21% of those men reported the matter to an authority In 2008 RC Gender Relations Survey • 3.5% of women • 0.9% of men – Only 26% of those women reported the matter to an authority or organization – Consistent with Active duty data 45
  46. 46. Reasons for Not Reporting • Felt uncomfortable making a report • Thought they would be labeled a troublemaker • Did not want anyone to know about the incident • Did not think anything would be done • Feared retaliation • Not important enough to report • Thought they would not be believed • Thought reporting would take too much time and effort • Did not report because they did not know how • Thought it may negatively impact their career (i.e. Security clearance) 46
  47. 47. Overview • Introduction • History, DoD Policy and Program • Reporting Options • Victim Support • Current Statistics • Prevention Efforts • Additional Resources 47
  48. 48. Rationale for Prevention • Undermines core values • Degrades mission readiness • Subverts strategic goodwill • Raises financial costs • Takes a human toll 48 48
  49. 49. The DoD Prevention Strategy • Key Features: – Spectrum of Prevention: Interventions at all levels of military society to influence knowledge, skills, and behaviors that support prevention – Core Intervention: Active Bystander Intervention • Teaching people how to – Recognize potential problems – Intervene Safely – Social Marketing Campaign • Reinforces all other interventions and training 49
  50. 50. *Davis, R., Parks, L., and Cohen, L. (2006) Sexual Violence and the Spectrum of Prevention: Towards a Community Solution. Enola, PA: The National Sexual Violence Resource Center. 50
  51. 51. Desired End State: Culture Change • How are we changing DoD culture? – Service Accession Focus: • Customs and Courtesies • Duty to Prevent and Encourage Reporting The Military will be the last place a predator or rapist wants to be. 51
  52. 52. Social Marketing Tactics • Posters • PSAs – TV – Radio – Armed Forces Networks – Base Theaters – Civilian • “MyDuty.mil/sapr.mil” • Leadership Support Imperative – Commander’s Guide sent out via command channels • Sexual Assault Response Coordinators • Print ads 52 52
  53. 53. 53 53
  54. 54. My Strength is For Defending. 56
  55. 55. Overview • Introduction • History, DoD Policy and Program • Victim Support • Reporting Options • Current Statistics • Prevention Efforts • Additional Resources 57
  56. 56. Supporting Web site: Victims 58
  57. 57. Supporting Radio Spots Supporting Web site: Policy 59
  58. 58. Way-Ahead Highlights • Program Planning – USD (P&R) Strategic Plan – DoD-wide Strat Plan and Oversight Framework • Program Improvements – Expanding the policy to DoD contractors who are U.S. citizens • Program Communication – Four new reports legislated by Congress • Reserve Component (RC) Specific – Will focus on RC for this year’s policy assistance visits – Upcoming review on RC 60
  59. 59. 1401 Wilson Blvd, Ste 402 Arlington, VA 22209 703-696-9422 sapro@wso.whs.mil 61
  60. 60. Objectives Review  Define “sexual assault” and “consent” within the Department of Defense  Articulate the different reporting options: Unrestricted and Restricted  Recognize the members of the Sexual Assault Response Team  Assess how to utilize resources to prevent sexual assault and support victims 62
  61. 61. RCC Training and Quality Assurance Conference Dr. Kaye Whitley Director

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