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Gingras

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Gingras

  1. 1. Creating the Future of News Questions to Consider Richard Gingras gingras@google.com April 20, 2012
  2. 2. Disruption in Media Not the first. Not the last.
  3. 3. Disruption in Media   Shi$s  in  distribu-on  shape     the  business  model       The  40  “golden”  years  of   newspaper  profitability  was   triggered  by  an  earlier  media   disrup;on:  television.     Open  distribu;on  of  the   Internet  eradicated  print   distribu;on  leverage   1949 1959 Newspapers TV
  4. 4. Brand & Scope Defining products in a marketplace of niches
  5. 5. Brand  &  Scope     Content  economy  is  less  about   demographics;  more  about  context   and  relevance     Disaggregated,  open,  and  filled  with   niche  players     Cross-­‐subsidiza;on  was  important  for   newspapers.  Now  it’s  more  difficult     Consider  the  cost/revenue  economics   at  the  segment  level  
  6. 6. Brand  &  Scope   In  a  marketplace  rich  with   niche  players,  does  an  all-­‐ things-­‐to-­‐all-­‐people  “portal”   product  make  sense?  Might  it   beSer  be  thought  of  as  a   stable  of  focused  brands?   Q:
  7. 7. Audience Flows & Site Design Optimizing for multiple entry points
  8. 8. Audience Flows & Site Design Story Page 75% Home Page 25%
  9. 9. Audience  Flows  &  Site  Design   How  do  changes  in  audience   flows  impact  site  design,  or   indeed  trigger  the  rethinking   the  very  defini;on  of  a   website?   Q:
  10. 10. Content Architecture Capacity is unlimited. Creating content is expensive. Use it all.
  11. 11. Content  Architecture     Not  about  edi;ons.  Not  about  ephemeral   streams  of  ar;cles     It  can  be  a  real-­‐;me,  living  resource       The  story  page  is  the  most  valuable  real  estate!   Ephemeral anthrax attack article Persistent anthrax attack resource
  12. 12. Content  Architecture   Should  we  not  explore  and   adopt  new  approaches  that   maintain  the  full  expression   of  a  reporter’s  efforts  in  one   place  behind  a  persistent   URL?   Q:
  13. 13. Style & Form “Every new medium begins as a container for the old”
  14. 14.   The  right  form  for  the  right   medium  –  long,  short,  other     The  evolu;on  of  the  social   network  post     Effec;ve  user  of  embedded  links   and  footnotes     Properly  tuning  for  search     Leveraging  rich  media  when  it   makes  sense  
  15. 15. Style  and  Form   In  a  culture  of  bullet  points,   updates,  and  posts,  are  there   approaches  to  conveying  in-­‐ depth  journalism  that  move   beyond  the  current   templates?   Q:
  16. 16. Computational Journalism Big data. Smart data. Knowledge.
  17. 17.   Computer  programming  to  mul;ply  the   value  of  a  reporter’s  efforts     Inves;ga;ve     reports  wriSen     with  Fusion  tables     and  query  strings     A  logical  part  of     the  resource  mix  
  18. 18. Computa;onal  Journalism   Can  computa;onal  journalism   be  used  not  only  to  help  with   stories  but  eventually  become   persistent,  automated   inves;ga;ve  reports?     Q:
  19. 19. Reporter’s Tools Getting the most out of a most precious asset
  20. 20. Reporter’s  Tools   Since  the  medium  can   accommodate  the  full   expression  of  a  reporter’s   work,  is  there  not  huge  value   in  developing  tools  to   op;mize  a  reporter’s  efforts?   Q: 2.0
  21. 21. Organizational Roles The right approach for the right medium at the right time
  22. 22. Organiza;onal  Roles  &  Workflow   The  role  of  a  reporter  when   tools,  ;ming  and  procedures   are  different     The  role  of  an  editor  in  an   edi;on-­‐less  environment  with   mul;ple  forums  to  engage     The  use  of  different  resources   from  computa;onal   journalists  to  the  trusted   crowd  
  23. 23. Organiza;onal  Roles  &  Workflow   Given  current  and  future   advances  in  how  news  is   gathered,  organized  and   presented,  does  that  not   require  a  complete  “digital   first”  rethinking  of  editorial   roles  and  workflow?      .  .  .   Q:
  24. 24. Organiza;onal  Roles  &  Workflow   .  .  .    Are  there  new  approaches   that  let  news  organiza;ons   leverage  the  assistance  of  the   trusted  crowd?  .  .  .   Q:
  25. 25. Organiza;onal  Roles  &  Workflow   .  .  .    Might  we  benefit  from   systems  that  allow  small  news   orgs  to  collaborate  and  work   together?   Q:
  26. 26. Culture of Innovation It is not a luxury. It can’t be intermittent.1 It must be part of an organization’s DNA.2 1. Cycle of change is too rapid 2. No, it’s not a Chief Innovation Officer!
  27. 27. Culture  of  Innova;on   How  do  we  staff  news   organiza;ons  with  the  right   resources  and  the  right   mindset  to  imbue  constant   innova;on  into  the  culture’s   DNA  and  into  the  role  of  every   par;cipant?   Q:
  28. 28. A Different World Quality journalism is more important than ever
  29. 29. A  Different  World     The  Internet  can  offer  support  any   opinion,  belief,  or  fear  and  give  it   greater  volume     We  can  no  longer  say,  “trust  us   because  you  should  trust  us.”     We  need  new  methods,  new  forms,   new  tools  
  30. 30. A  Different  World   Can  journalism’s  future  be   stronger  and  beSer  than  its   past?   Doesn’t  it  have  to  be?  Isn’t   that  why  we  are  here?   Q:

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