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Avila

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ISOJ 2014

Published in: News & Politics
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Avila

  1. 1. Bienvenido a Miami y Más: Immigration Frames in English and Spanish Newspapers During the 2012 Florida Republican Primary A.J. “Alex” Avila PhD Candidate School of Journalism alexavila@utexas.edu • http://alexavila.wikispaces.com
  2. 2. Is Catering to Latino Voters a Joke? alexavila@utexas.edu • http://alexavila.wikispaces.com
  3. 3. Florida 2000 Election alexavila@utexas.edu • http://alexavila.wikispaces.com
  4. 4. Florida’s Changing Latino Demographics alexavila@utexas.edu • http://alexavila.wikispaces.com • 1960 – 1980 – Political Exodus from Cuba • 1980 – present – Economic Exodus • Politics dominated by early political exodus with a strong, anti-Castro, right wing slant
  5. 5. Florida’s Changing Latino Demographics alexavila@utexas.edu • http://alexavila.wikispaces.com • 1960 Florida had 2.2% of all mainland Puerto Ricans • 2000 Florida had 14.4% of all mainland Puerto Ricans • In 2003, Orlando became the 4th largest Puerto Rican city in the mainland (NY, Philadelphia, Chicago)
  6. 6. Florida’s Fluid Latino Vote alexavila@utexas.edu • http://alexavila.wikispaces.com • This new makeup of Florida’s Latino population was hard to predict politically • By 2012, the Cuban vote in Florida no longer defined the overall Hispanic vote
  7. 7. Florida Presidential Primary 2012 alexavila@utexas.edu • http://alexavila.wikispaces.com • Florida GOP moves its primary to Jan. 31 from March 6. • During the primary season, Florida is the fifth state after Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina. • South Carolina the first state with a major African-American voting population. • Florida the first state with a major Latino voting population.
  8. 8. Issues alexavila@utexas.edu • http://alexavila.wikispaces.com • Politically, S. Florida Cuban Americans leaned Republican – Age Gap • Cuban Exiles • Native Americans • Central Florida Puerto Ricans leaned Democrat • Newspaper’s tend to reflect the local mainstream • Ethnic papers reflect more alternative or minority views.
  9. 9. Why a Framing Study? alexavila@utexas.edu • http://alexavila.wikispaces.com • Words Matter! – Who says what, how? • Illegal or Undocumented? • Framing helps to understand the power dynamics behind who is shaping the media
  10. 10. Research Questions alexavila@utexas.edu • http://alexavila.wikispaces.com • RQ1: What are the identifiable immigration issue frames commonly used in news media? • RQ2: How do English-language news media use issue frames when discussing immigration? • RQ3: How do Spanish-language news media use issue frames when discussing immigration?
  11. 11. Immigration Frames Found alexavila@utexas.edu • http://alexavila.wikispaces.com Table 4. What Issue Frame is Identified by the Context? Miami Herald El Nuevo Herald Orlando Sentinel El Sentinel 1. Political Issue 19.3% 15.5% 20.0% 30.3% 2. Anti-immigrant 17.8% 27.3% 15.6% 3.0% 3. Policy & Enforcement 14.1% 8.2% 4.4% 12.1% 4. Illegal/Undocumented 11.1% 16.4% 28.9% 6.1% 5. Reform or Stance 21.5% 22.7% 20.0% 33.3% 6. Worker/Laborer 2.2% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 7. Community 5.9% 3.6% 4.4% 3.0% 8. Immigration Status 3.7% 0.9% 4.4% 0.0% 9. Political Advocacy 4.4% 5.5% 2.2% 12.1% Total # of Articles Articles w/ Coded Words Percent Total Coded Words 25 18 72% n=135 20 18 90% n=110 9 6 66.7% n=45 7 7 100% n=33 (RQ1 Answer – Identifiable Immigration Issue Frames)
  12. 12. t-Test English Newspaper Frames Miami Herald Orlando Sentinel 1. Political Issue 19.3% 20.0% 2. Anti-immigrant 17.8% 15.6% 3. Policy & Enforcement 14.1% 4.4% 4. Illegal/Undocumented 11.1% 28.9% 5. Reform or Stance 21.5% 20.0% 6. Worker/Laborer 2.2% 0.0% 7. Community 5.9% 4.4% 8. Immigration Status 3.7% 4.4% 9. Political Advocacy 4.4% 2.2% Total # of Articles Articles w/ Coded Words Percent Total Coded Words 25 18 72% n=135 9 6 66.7% n=45 • There was a significant difference in the scores for Miami Herald (M=15, SD=9.9) and Orlando Sentinel (M=5, SD=4.6); t(16)=2.7443, p=0.019. – With a significance level under the threshold (p<0.05) we reject the Null Hypothesis. alexavila@utexas.edu • http://alexavila.wikispaces.com
  13. 13. t-Test Spanish Newspaper Frames El Nuevo Herald El Sentinel 1. Political Issue 15.5% 30.3% 2. Anti-immigrant 27.3% 3.0% 3. Policy & Enforcement 8.2% 12.1% 4. Illegal/Undocumented 16.4% 6.1% 5. Reform or Stance 22.7% 33.3% 6. Worker/Laborer 0.0% 0.0% 7. Community 3.6% 3.0% 8. Immigration Status 0.9% 0.0% 9. Political Advocacy 5.5% 12.1% Total # of Articles Articles w/ Coded Words Percent Total Coded Words 20 18 90% n=110 7 7 100% n=33 • There was a significant difference in the scores for El Heraldo (M=12.2, SD= 10.8) and El Sentinel (M=3.7, SD=4.2); t(16)=2.224, p=0.049. – The low number of samples in Spanish Orlando, however, makes the reliability of this parametric test questionable. alexavila@utexas.edu • http://alexavila.wikispaces.com
  14. 14. t-Test English v. Spanish Miami Miami Herald El Nuevo Herald 1. Political Issue 19.3% 15.5% 2. Anti-immigrant 17.8% 27.3% 3. Policy & Enforcement 14.1% 8.2% 4. Illegal/Undocumented 11.1% 16.4% 5. Reform or Stance 21.5% 22.7% 6. Worker/Laborer 2.2% 0.0% 7. Community 5.9% 3.6% 8. Immigration Status 3.7% 0.9% 9. Political Advocacy 4.4% 5.5% Total # of Articles Articles w/ Coded Words Percent Total Coded Words 25 18 72% n=135 20 18 90% n=110 • There was not a statistically significant difference in the scores for the Miami Herald (M=15, SD= 9.9) and El Heraldo de Miami (M=12.2, SD=10.8); t(16)=2.1199, p=0.057. – There were differences but not statistically significant ones at of 0.05 threshold. alexavila@utexas.edu • http://alexavila.wikispaces.com
  15. 15. t-Test English v. Spanish Orlando Table 4. What Issue Frame is Identified by the Context? Orlando Sentinel El Sentinel 1. Political Issue 20.0% 30.3% 2. Anti-immigrant 15.6% 3.0% 3. Policy & Enforcement 4.4% 12.1% 4. Illegal/Undocumented 28.9% 6.1% 5. Reform or Stance 20.0% 33.3% 6. Worker/Laborer 0.0% 0.0% 7. Community 4.4% 3.0% 8. Immigration Status 4.4% 0.0% 9. Political Advocacy 2.2% 12.1% Total # of Articles Articles w/ Coded Words Percent Total Coded Words 9 6 66.7% n=45 7 7 100% n=33 (RQ1 Answer – Identifiable Immigration Issue Frames) • There was not a statistically significant difference in the results for the sister publications in Orlando. • The e Orlando Sentinel (M=5, SD= 4.6) and El Sentinel de Orlando (M=3.7, SD=4.2); t(16)=0.6468, p=0.053. – Small sample of Orlando Spanish articles may have skewed parametric calculations. – You don’t need a parametric test to see something is going on here. alexavila@utexas.edu • http://alexavila.wikispaces.com
  16. 16. What does this mean? alexavila@utexas.edu • http://alexavila.wikispaces.com • Obviously, different communities frame issues differently. • How the same news organization frames different Language communities remains a question.
  17. 17. alexavila@utexas.edu • http://alexavila.wikispaces.com A.J. “Alex” Avila PhD Candidate School of Journalism

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