Filters Of Perception Introduction

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Discovery your own teaching and learning styles

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Filters Of Perception Introduction

  1. 1. Filters of Perception EDU 5101 Introduction to teacher learning perceptions.
  2. 2. Filters of Perception <ul><li>Cognitive Styles </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Field Dependent </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Field Independent </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Representational Systems </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Visual </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Kinesthetic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Auditory </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Educational Belief Systems </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cognitive Process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Self-Actualization </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Technologism </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Academic Rationalism </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social Reconstructionism </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Cognitive Styles <ul><li>Field Dependent </li></ul><ul><li>Field Independent </li></ul>Which one are you?
  4. 4. Assessing Cognitive Styles <ul><li>Like to work in groups, to do things with others </li></ul><ul><li>Like to help others achieve; enjoy being part of a group or team. </li></ul><ul><li>Am influenced by what other people thin-their expressions of confidence or doubt </li></ul><ul><li>Like to know what is expected of me before I do a job or work on a project – before I get involved. </li></ul><ul><li>Tend to remember wholes, like faces and overall impressions, rather than part, like names and specific details </li></ul><ul><li>Rely on my intuition to solve problems and make decisions. </li></ul><ul><li>Openly express affection and positive feelings for others. </li></ul><ul><li>Like to be shown how to do something before I try it; feel better if I have a model to follow. </li></ul><ul><li>Need concrete illustrations to make meaning out of what I am experiencing; learn best when what I am trying to learn is related to my personal likes and experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Like to work alone; prefer to do things by myself. </li></ul><ul><li>Like to compete and gain individual recognition for achievement. </li></ul><ul><li>Do my own thing regardless of what other people think. </li></ul><ul><li>Like to set my own goals and standards for my work or my activities. </li></ul><ul><li>Easily remember details and parts of an experience I have with people or things, like names and specific faces. </li></ul><ul><li>Rely on logic and rational analysis to solve problems and make decisions. </li></ul><ul><li>Am not demonstrative; do not openly express my affection for others. </li></ul><ul><li>Like to try new things on my own without help; like to figure things out for myself. </li></ul><ul><li>Like to deal with abstractions; can find meaning in information and ideas that are unfamiliar or not directly related to my personal life. </li></ul>2 1 0 1 2 Total ____ Total____
  5. 5. Field Dependent vs. Field Independent Individuals <ul><li>Enjoy working with others </li></ul><ul><li>Take in the overall scheme </li></ul><ul><li>Are collaborative, have mentor relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Work from intuition and gut reactions </li></ul><ul><li>Can have difficulty with individual parts. </li></ul><ul><li>Like and need concrete experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Like metaphor, analogy, relationships </li></ul><ul><li>See things holistically. </li></ul><ul><li>Like to work alone, get the job done. </li></ul><ul><li>Are task oriented, formal </li></ul><ul><li>Perceive analytically, see parts to whole </li></ul><ul><li>Like to figure things out for themselves </li></ul><ul><li>Learn through books </li></ul><ul><li>Have a logical, rational, impersonal orientation </li></ul><ul><li>Like theoretical & abstract ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Are good at sequence & details </li></ul>
  6. 6. Modality Strength Checklist Attack problems physically; impulsive Talk problems out, try solutions verbally, whispers Deliberate; plan in advance; organize thoughts by writing them Problem-solving Not attentive to visual, auditory presentation so seem distractible. Easily distracted by sounds Usually unaware of sounds, distracted by visual disorder or movement. Distractibility Imagery not important; those that do occur are paired with movement. Whispers, thinks in sounds, details less important Vivid imagination; think in pictures, visualize in detail Imagery Remember best what was done, not what was seen or talked about. Remember names, forget faces, remember by auditory repetition Remember faces, forget names; write things down, take notes Memory Good initially, deteriorate when space becomes smaller; push harder on writing instrument. Have more trouble learning in beginning stages; tend to write lightly, say strokes when writing. Tend to be good, especially when young; spacing and size are good; appearance is important Handwriting Often a poor speller; write words to see if they “feel” right. Use a phonetic approach; has auditory attack skills Recognize words by sight; rely on configuration of words Spelling Likes stories where action occurs early, fidgets when reading; handle books, not an avid reader. Enjoys dialogue, plays, avoids long descriptions, unaware of illustrations; moves lips or whispers Like description, sometimes stops reading to stare into space & imagine scene; intense concentration Reading Learn by doing or direct involvement Learn by self or verbal instructions from others Learn by watching & demonstration Learning Style Kinesthetic Auditory Visual
  7. 7. Total points in each column (combined points must equal 14) Response to music by physical movement; prefer sculpture; touch statues & paintings; Favor music; find less appeal in visual art, but able to discuss it; miss significant detail but appreciate the work as a whole Not particularly responsive to music; prefer the visual arts; tend not to voice appreciation of art any kind but can be deeply affected by visual displays; focuses on details Response to the Arts Neat but soon becomes wrinkled through activity Matching clothes not so important; can explain choices of clothes Neat; meticulous, like order; may choose not to change appearance General Gestures when speaking; don not listen well; stand close when speaking or listening; use words like get, take, etc… Enjoy listening but cannot wait to talk; descriptions are long but repetitive; likes hearing self and others talk; use words like listen, hear, Quiet; do not talk at length; become impatient when long listening is required; use words such as see, look, etc… Communication Jump for joy; hung, tug & pull when happy, stamp, jump, & pound when mad. Watch body tone for emotion Shout with joy or anger, blow up verbally but calm down quickly, express emotion verbally and in tone Somewhat repressed; stare when angry; cry easily/beam when happy, read face easily Emotionality Try things out; touch feel, manipulate Talk about situation, pros & cons, what to do Look around; examine structure Response to New Stimulus Fidget; find reasons to move; hold up hand Home; talk to self or others Stare; doodle; find something to watch Response to Periods of Inactivity Kinesthetic Auditory Visual Total points in each column (combined points must equal 14) Response to music by physical movement; prefer sculpture; touch statues & paintings; Favor music; find less appeal in visual art, but able to discuss it; miss significant detail but appreciate the work as a whole Not particularly responsive to music; prefer the visual arts; tend not to voice appreciation of art any kind but can be deeply affected by visual displays; focuses on details Response to the Arts Neat but soon becomes wrinkled through activity Matching clothes not so important; can explain choices of clothes Neat; meticulous, like order; may choose not to change appearance General Gestures when speaking; don not listen well; stand close when speaking or listening; use words like get, take, etc… Enjoy listening but cannot wait to talk; descriptions are long but repetitive; likes hearing self and others talk; use words like listen, hear, Quiet; do not talk at length; become impatient when long listening is required; use words such as see, look, etc… Communication Jump for joy; hung, tug & pull when happy, stamp, jump, & pound when mad. Watch body tone for emotion Shout with joy or anger, blow up verbally but calm down quickly, express emotion verbally and in tone Somewhat repressed; stare when angry; cry easily/beam when happy, read face easily Emotionality Try things out; touch feel, manipulate Talk about situation, pros & cons, what to do Look around; examine structure Response to New Stimulus Fidget; find reasons to move; hold up hand Home; talk to self or others Stare; doodle; find something to watch Response to Periods of Inactivity Kinesthetic Auditory Visual
  8. 8. Visual vs. Auditory vs. Kinesthetic <ul><li>VISUAL </li></ul><ul><li>see foreshadow </li></ul><ul><li>Look red/blue/purple </li></ul><ul><li>observe </li></ul><ul><li>watch </li></ul><ul><li>clear </li></ul><ul><li>viewpoint </li></ul><ul><li>perspective </li></ul><ul><li>point of view </li></ul><ul><li>visualize </li></ul><ul><li>eyeball </li></ul><ul><li>hazy </li></ul><ul><li>fuzzy </li></ul><ul><li>murky </li></ul><ul><li>vivid </li></ul><ul><li>light </li></ul><ul><li>transparent </li></ul><ul><li>lighten up </li></ul><ul><li>picture </li></ul><ul><li>reflect </li></ul><ul><li>focus </li></ul><ul><li>image </li></ul><ul><li>mirror </li></ul><ul><li>Insight </li></ul><ul><li>looking something up </li></ul>AUDITORY hear so to speak listen speak tell myself verbalize talk say told clear as a bell tune in resonate tone harmonize volume loud dissonant pitch high pitched low key squeaky singsong ring my chimes unheard of well said KINESTHETIC feel pain in the neck grasp itchy handle foot the bill energetic soft touch in touch gut feeling firm foundation on the level relaxed tense weighty murky heavy come to grips lightweight raise an issue grasp the situation let go sleep on it hurt touchy irrational pushy
  9. 9. Educational Belief Systems <ul><li>Cognitive Process </li></ul><ul><li>Self-Actualization </li></ul><ul><li>Technologism </li></ul><ul><li>Academic Rationalism </li></ul><ul><li>Social Reconstructionism </li></ul>
  10. 10. Belief Systems Characteristics <ul><li>Rank your main purposes of education as follows from 1 – 5: </li></ul><ul><li>__ 1. Develop student’s ability to think clearly, use intellectual reasoning to solve problems, and make rational decisions. </li></ul><ul><li>__ 2. Nurture the individual child’s unique potential to allow full development of his or her creativity and sensitivity, and encourage personal integrity, love of learning, and self-fulfillment. </li></ul><ul><li>__3. Diagnose the learner’s needs and abilities, and design instructional strategies that develop skills and competencies in a step-by-step, sequential manner. </li></ul><ul><li>__4. Transmit to young people the basic knowledge, skills, traditions, academic concepts, and values necessary to interpret, participate in, and further the heritage and traditions of our country. </li></ul><ul><li>__5. Created an intense awareness of the critical social and environmental issues, and develop a consciousness of responsibility and reform to ensure the survival of society. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Belief Systems Characteristics Newspapers, current events, school problems Basic tests, classical literature Learning activity packages, modules, computers Multiple, varied,student- created, individualized Problem focuses, data sources, discrepant events Organization Of Materials Molding Imitative Stimulus-response Skinnerian, behavioral conditioning Humanistic/ holistic/ gestalt Cognitivist Education Psychology Social being- member of the group Container/vessel to be filled/sponge to absorb Information processor, input- Throughput-output Within each individual are potentials to be nourished Problem-solver, mind over mater, all learning in brain View of Learner Problems of society now & in the future Truth, classics, structure of disciplines, traditional values Measurable learning, task analysis Individual needs, interests, abilities Scientific method, problem-solving, thinking as basic Sources of Goals Social Reconstruc- tionism Academic Rationalism Technologism Self Actualization Cognitive Processor
  12. 12. Belief Systems Characteristics 21 st Century, student rights, survival, consumer education, peace, environment Conceptual themes, traditional values, classics, rigor, humanities, basics, 3rs, scholarly Task analysis, MBO, computer assisted learning, teacher-proof competencies, accountability Peak experience, nurturance, whole child, affective, individual Cognitive processes, cognition, thinking skills, intellectual development Vocabulary Ferguson, Cremin Toffler, Shane Friere, Whitehead, Illich, Capra, Goodall Bestor, Adler, Hirsch, Bennett, Finn, Ravitch Skinner, Pavlov, Thorndike, Hull, Mager, Popham, Hunter, Papert Maslow, Combs, Rogers, Buzan, Leonard, Simon, Edwards, Chopra Montessori, Brucer. Piaget, Bloom, Feuerstein, deBono, Perkins Leaders in the Field Social concern &cooperation, empathy Content mastery, achievement testing, summative Entry level-mastery level, pre-&post-testing, gain scores Self-evaluation, demonstration of increased autonomy Observation of performance in problem situations Methods of Evaluation Simulations, role-playing, values awareness Lecturing, note-taking, memorization Diagnosis-prescription, management systems, task analysis Self-directing learning centers, individualized Inquiry, critical thinking, problem solving Teaching Strategy Social Reconstruc- tionism Academic Rationalism Technologism Self Actualization Cognitive Processor
  13. 13. <ul><li>Costa, Arthur L. and Garmston, Robert J. (2002) Cognitive Coaching Christopher-Gordon Publishers, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>Payne, Ruby K., Ph. D, (1998) Learning Structures aha! Process, Inc. </li></ul>References

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