Alcuglobal education

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Alcuglobal education

  1. 1. 21st CENTURY EDUCATION:DEVELOPING GLOBAL MINDS Prof. Cecilia B. Manikan
  2. 2. FIVE MINDS FOR THE FUTURE (Gardner, 2008) The Ethical Mind (Universal Values) The Respectful Mind (Inclusive/Unitive) The Creating Mind (Innovation) The Synthesizing Mind (Systemic) The Disciplined Mind (Domain Mastery)
  3. 3. Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy Creating Evaluating Analyzing Applying Understanding Remembering
  4. 4. 21st CENTURY MODEL OF GLOBAL & INNOVATIVE MIND: STEVE JOBS SCIENCE /TECHNOLOGY + ART (INTUITION/IMAGINATION) Logical Visual Factual Holistic Critical Intuitive Technical Innovative Analytical Imaginative Structured Interpersonal Sequential Kinesthetic Organized Emotional Detailed Sensory Planned Feeling EXPERIMENTATION + USER-FRIENDLY
  5. 5. 21st century trends GLOBALIZATION Use and Impact of Technology Formation of Global Values Internationalization of EducationNEW POSITIONING FOR SCHOOLS Curriculum Design, Methods, Materials, Learning Spaces, Systems/Processes
  6. 6. Change Elements that Impact Education Changing world requires lifestyle changes (worldviews, markets, communication) New Knowledge and New Functional requirements in the workplace
  7. 7. I. IMPACT OF TECHNOLOGY Technology is changing the Educational scenario! How do we bridge the digital divide?
  8. 8. Growth in non-traditional markets Education can be availed outside the walls of traditional campuses
  9. 9. Consider how the following affect your school delivery system: Information is everywhere for everyone Knowledge is just a mouse click away
  10. 10. Connectivity Education should prepare students as citizens of a global community
  11. 11. Technology will continue to revolutionize education… how well are you meeting its demands?
  12. 12. 21st Century Educational Leadership Model Curriculum Leaning Evaluation Experiences and Materials Design and Philosophy Development V-M-O Training/Cap Instructional ability Supervision Building Human Resource Skills & Competencies, Values & Attitudes
  13. 13. FOR EDUCATION TO BE TRULY RELEVANT AND EFFECTIVE, SCHOOLSYSTEMS MUST CONTEND WITH THE FOLLOWING: TECHNOLOGYINTERNATIONALIZATION OF EDUCATIONINCREASING LOCAL, REGIONAL, AND INTERNATIONALCOMPETITIONHOW BEST TO PREPARE STUDENTS FOR GLOBALCITIZENSHIP AND NEW REQUIREMENTS OF A GLOBALIZEDWORKPLACE
  14. 14. TRANSFORMATIVE INNOVATIONS ARE REQUIRED IN THE FOLLOWING:  Curriculum/ Curriculum Design  Methods and Learning Materials  Learning Spaces  Systems and Processes
  15. 15. III. EDUCATIONAL REPOSITIONING THE HONGKONG MODEL NATIONAL VISION “GLOBAL LEADERSHIP IN THE REGION” Question: What is the role of Hongkong’s educational system in making it a major player in global competitiveness?
  16. 16. Hongkong’s Integrated EDUCATIONAL POSITIONING HK University of Science and Technology HK Teachers’ Academy HK Chinese Polytechnic University of University HKSTRONG, BASIC EDUCATION IN MATH, SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ARTS
  17. 17. HOW DO WE DEVELOP GLOBAL MINDS? The Ethical Mind (Universal Values) The Respectful Mind (Inclusive/Unitive) The Creating Mind (Innovation) The Synthesizing Mind (Systemic) The Disciplined Mind (Domain Mastery)
  18. 18. EFFECTIVE INTERVENTIONS Whole-Brain Approach to Teaching and LearningIntegration of arts in the curriculumIntegration of global values in schoolsystemsEducational collaboration/transnationaleducation (TNE)
  19. 19. WHOLE-BRAIN FACULTYCAPABILITIY BUILDING SELF-MASTERY THROUGHWHOLE-BRAIN DEVELOPMENT
  20. 20. RATIONALE Education envisions an integrated, highly functioning individual capable of managing self, others, and the world in varied, changing situations of life. Total person development requires self-mastery in the basic functions of navigating life through whole-brain thinking, learning, and doing. For education to achieve this goal, teachers need to develop the self-mastery skills and whole-brain understanding and capability that we seek students to acquire and develop.
  21. 21. Course DescriptionThis training program equips teachers with knowledge andtools towards transformative whole-brain learning and thedevelopment of the 7 self-mastery skills of highlyfunctioning individuals.The 5-day module is an experiential journey into thedifferent parts and functions of the brain and therequirements that would promote: Learning to Think Learning to Do Learning to Feel Learning to Communicate Learning to Intuit Learning to Lead Learning to Be
  22. 22. The HBDI developed by Hermann yielded a brain dominance profile Logical Visual Factual Holistic Critical Intuitive Technical Innovative Analytical Conceptual Quantitative Imaginative Conservative Interpersonal Structure Kinesthetic Sequential Emotional Organized Spiritual Detailed Sensory Planned Feeling
  23. 23. Whole-Brain Objectives7 Self-Mastery Skills APPLICATION: IQ• Learning To Think  ACADEMICS IQ2• Learning to Do  SPIRITUAL EQ FORMATION• Learning to Feel AQ  SOCIAL• Learning to Communicate SQ RESPONSIBILITY• Learning to Intuit• Learning to Lead• Learning to Be
  24. 24. THE 7 SELF-MASTERY SKILLS & 5Q’s WITHIN THE QUADRANTS A D Analytical Holistic LEARNING TO LEARNING TO THINK (logically) THINK (creatively) LEARNING TO LEARNING TO COMMUNICATE LEARNING INTUIT TO LEAD IQ AQ & SQ IQ2 LEARNING TO BE LEARNING TO DO LEARNING TO FEEL B CSequential Emotional EQ
  25. 25. WHOLE-BRAINAPPROACH APPLIED TO BASIC EDUCATION
  26. 26. Grade 3 - Basic Concepts of Fractions and Decimals End States THINK DO FEEL COMMUNI INTUIT LEAD BE CATEMorally Understand A humbleUpright that each Perform Embrace Express Reflect how Recognize part of(UNITAS) one is a one’s role and value the idea each one giftedness in the fraction of as part of diversity as that one completes everyone whole God’s God’s means to cannot be the whole but a gift creation. family wholeness whole to Each one is and unity without everyone part of the God and whole neighborAcademical- Master Apply basic Appreciate Express Able to Encourage Precisely excellent concepts concepts of the ideas as estimate others to and(VERITAS) of fractions fractions importance they relate simple participate in accurate and and of accuracy to wholes quantitative math games learner decimals decimals in as and values based involving real life expressed fractions on fractions & fractions and situations in fractions decimals decimals and decimalsSocially Under- Perform Promote Express Regard a Promote Youngresponsible standing one’s task love and the need community unity through person(CARITAS) one’s role as member respect of for working where cooperation for in the of family, neighbors and everyone and others community school, and helping feels a sense collaboration community one of another belongingnes s
  27. 27. Whole-Brain Goals of CATHOLIC EDUCATION A D Analytical Holistic CHRIST- CENTERED ACADMICALLY ACADEMIC EXCELLENT CHRISTIAN MASTERY SOCIALLY FORMATION RESPONSIBLE B CSequential SERVICE Emotional TO LOCAL CHURCH & COMMUNITY
  28. 28. I. SUBJECT AREA/PER LEVEL RUBRICS FOR THE 7 MASTERY SKILLS APPLIED TO:  Academic excellence  Spiritual/Moral Formation  Social ResponsivenessII. PASSING RATE IN NATIONAL ACADEMIC TESTS AND STANDARDSIII. APOSTOLATE WORK AND OTHER COMMUNITY SERVICES
  29. 29. KEY RESULT AREAS FOR WHOLE-BRAIN BASIC EDUCATION For Learners:1) Higher Performance and Achievement (School-based, Regional, and National Tests)2) Admission of graduates to top tertiary schools3) Intra-school awards, honors, and recognition4) Meaningful social service and environmental consciousness5) Christ-centered,global outlook6) Creative, Innovative, Life-long learners
  30. 30. KEY RESULT AREAS FOR WHOLE-BRAIN BASIC EDUCATION For Academic & Non-Academic Staff1) Low turn-over rate2) Highly motivated, loyal, and dedicated3) High level of professional competencies4) Creative, innovative, progressive thinkers
  31. 31. KEY RESULT AREAS FOR WHOLE-BRAIN BASIC EDUCATIONFOR THE SCHOOL Good reputation Increase in enrolment Greater support from parents and community Awards, Citations, and Recognition
  32. 32. Research Findings onSUPERIOR TEACHING
  33. 33. ABSTRACT EMERGENT MAJOR CORE “ BEYOND CATEGORIES CATEGORIES: CATEGORY: TEACHING: (SETS A, B, C) Purpose Becoming an The Theory of Practice Outstanding Personhood Academic Becoming an Outstanding Academic (O.A.) Developmental Patterns Outstanding (Qualities and Dimensions of & Influences of Great Teachers & Great Teaching) Outstanding Academics Academic in Philippine TertiarySET A EducationTEACHERSSET BSTUDENTSSET CMASTER TEACHERS
  34. 34. SET A Coding Results -TEACHERS’ CONCEPTIONS OFTHE QUALITIES & DIMENSIONS DEVELOPING POTENTIALOF AN OUTSTANDING ACADEMIC •Recognizes and nurtures talents •Symbolizes hope for better future •Inculcate Professional Values and Character •Teacher as model and agent of transformation LEARNER-CENTEREDNESS HAVING EFFECTIVE, CREATIVE, INNOVA •Love and concern for learners TIVE METHODS •Motivating students towards high achievement •Mastery of Different •Reaching out and making Teaching/ Learning Styles OUTSTANDING meaningful connection ACADEMIC •Motivates and elevates •Innovative and Adaptive students’ capacity for learning methods • PROFESSIONALLY PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES COMPETENT •Presence •Subject Mastery and •Commitment and Functional Expertise Professionalism •Practitoner-Orientation •Humanistic Qualities •Subject Relevance & •Character and Integrity Theoretical Application •Life-long Learning Skills •Emotional Intelligence • Humor
  35. 35. SET B ResultsSTUDENTS’ CONCEPTIONS OF GREAT DEVELOPING POTENTIALTEACHING/GREAT TEACHERS •Teaching as Spirituality •Nurturer of talents •Development of values and ELEVATION OF THINKING character Having •Influence in Career Choice •Teaching as Science EFFECTIVE, CREATIVE, IN &Development •Hones analytical and critical •Drives student performance thinking NOVATIVE METHODS • Teaching as Art & achievement •Develops reflective, critical •Creates own tools and and transformative thinking methods for better student •Sets high standards and understanding expectations •Nurtures student creativity •Mastery of the Art of and encourages originality Questioning GREAT TEACHERS PERSONAL Having PASSION ATTRIBUTES & ABILITY TO INSPIRE •Compelling Personality •Emotional Arousal & high • Sense of humor student engagement •Originality and uniqueness •Innate love for subject matter •Drives student performance and achievement •Cause for Emulation Having EXCELLENT •Depth & Originality of Ideas COMMUINICATION SKILLS •Effective use of language to connect and sustain interest •Effective use of language to ensure comprehension & understandability •Dramatization of concepts and ideas •Use of native language & culture in Shared with Teachers instruction
  36. 36. SET C Coding Results -Master Teachers Conceptions of Beingan Outstanding Academic HAVING A PERSONAL PHILOSOPHY OF LEARNING •Purpose, Role, and Meaning MAKING SUBJECT MATTER Awareness PROMOTING A CULTURE ALIVE & INTERESTING OF EXCELLENCE •Development of Potential (Taking responsibility and •Passion/Ability to inspire •Teaching as SCIENCE accountability for student learning) •Creative, Innovative •Total Mind Development Methods and Approaches •Rigorous Standards & •Transformative Evaluation teaching/learning processes •Development of lifelong •Diagnostic Thinking & •learning skills Effective Communication •Practitioner-Orientation Skills •Coaching and Mentoring •Knowledge and Mastery of •Valuing Pedagogical Styles and individuality, uniqueness, and Methods OUTSTANDING originality ACADEMIC • Teacher as Life-long learner PROFESSIONAL LEARNER- CENTEREDNESS VALUES & CHARACTER • Empathy for students • Professional commitment and discipline •Knowing, Understanding, Conn ecting, and Adapting to •Ethical Behavior; students’ learning needs Honesty, Justice & Fairness Shared with Students Shared with Teachers
  37. 37. Diagram Contrasting Categories between Teachers and Students TEACHERS • Developing STUDENTS Potential •Passion & Ability •Professional to Inspire Competence • Having Effective, •Excellent Communication •Learner- Creative and Skills Centeredness Innovative Methods •Elevates Thinking •Personal Attributes (Positive Presence, •Personal Attributes Professional, Dedicated, • Personal Compelling Personality, Committed, Humanistic High Attributes Originality/Uniqueness, Depth ) EQ, Lifelong learner) (Presence &Humor)
  38. 38. Comparative Presentation of Master Teachers and Teachers’ Categories (Maximization of Similarities and Differences) MASTER TEACHERS TEACHERS • Philosophy of Learning -Development (Taking accountability & of Potential responsibility for student •Professional learning) Competence - Learner- Centeredness • Making Subject Matter Alive and Interesting •Personal Values - Effective, Creative, (Passion/Inspiration) (Humanistic, Positive Innovative Methods (with Practitioner • Promoting a Culture of Presence, Sense of Orientation) Excellence Humor, High EQ) - Values • Professional Values & (Commitment and Depth of Character Discipline) - Honest, Fair, Ethical - Original, Insightful, Witty
  39. 39. . Comparison of Categories between Master Teacher and Students (Maximization of Similarities & Differences) MASTER TEACHERS •Development of Potential STUDENTS •Making Subject •Personal •Philosophy of Matter Alive and Attributes Learning Interesting: (Compelling, •Effective, Creative, Depth of •Learner- Innovative Methods Character, Centeredness •Passion Uniqueness, •Ability to Inspire Originality, •Professional Humor, Good Values •Excellent looks) (Honest, Communication Skills Fair, Ethical, •Promoting a Culture Committed, of Disciplined) Excellence (Teaching Thinking)
  40. 40. Figure 9. APPLYING THE *GLASERIAN DYNAMICS OF GROUP COMPARISONTO PRODUCE LEVELS, CONTINUA, DEGREES, & RELATIONSHIPS OFEFFECTIVE TEACHING LEVEL 1 - BASIC GOOD TEACHING (DIFFERENTIAL CATEGORIES OF TEACHERS +COMMUNICATION SKILLS BY STUDENTS) *Maximizing differences = Conceptual Gaps Learning Gaps LEVEL II – INTERMEDIATE CATEGORICAL UNIFORMITIES IN SETS A, B, C *Maximizing Similarities = Conceptual Uniformities Differential Categories for Superior Teaching LEVE III – MASTER TEACHING (DIFFERENTIAL CATEGORIES OF MASTER TEACHERS + SUBSUMED CATEGORIES OF STUDENTS) *Minimizing Differences = Standards for Superior Add’l category for Teaching superior teaching
  41. 41. Figure 10 . Categories of Teaching at Various Levels of Proficiency LEVEL III – MASTER TEACHING LEVEL II INTEMEDIATE •Personal Philosophy of Learning (Taking LEVEL I responsibility & accountability BASIC GOOD TEACHING for student learning; Upholding •Development of student rights & interests) Potential •Subject Mastery/ • Promoting a Culture of Professional •Learner- Excellence Competence Centeredness •Making Subject Matter • Diagnostic •Effective, Creative, Alive and Interesting Thinking & Good Innovative Methods (Passion/Inspiration, Communication (with Practitioner- Excellent Communication) Skills Orientation) •Values & Character •Personal • Professional (Ethical Behavior, Protecting student rights & interest, Wit, Qualities Values Originality, Depth of Character) (Humanistic, Commitment and Positive Presence, Discipline Sense of Humor) CONTINUUM OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT AS DICTATED BY THE CATEGORIES OF NEXT HIGHER LEVEL
  42. 42. DEVELOPMENTAL PATTERNS &INFLUENCES OF MASTER TEACHERSVERIFICATION SURVEY ON THE DEVELOPMENT OFCATEGORIES FOR SUPERIOR TEACHING
  43. 43. Table 7. SURVEY RESULTS – DEVELOPMENTAL PATTERNS & INFLUENCES OF MASTERSSummary of Categories, Sub-Categories, and Memos on the Development of Qualities for GreatTeaching CATEGORIES SUB-CATEGORIES MEMOSA. Career Level Some teachers become outstanding through - Highest academic degree in the in-depth field specialization, establishing1) Continuous Training and field academic authority and leadership in their Development - Continuing Education and particular fields.2) Innovation and Creation of Professional Training Great teachers are life-long learners who New Knowledge - Research and Publication continually develop the capacities of the self3) Academic Leadership and - Innovation and contribute new knowledge through Community Service - Honing Pedagogical skills research and educational innovation. - Career Pathing in the Academe Great teaching can be learned from experienced teachers and through continuous professional training and self- improvement in the craft.A. Pre -Teaching Influences (Childhood to Young - Children’s Classics As children, great teachers love learning, are Adulthood) - Encyclopedia avid readers, and have strong interest in the1) Natural Interest and Love - Stories humanities. Creative & Resourceful. for Learning - Literary Contests School training in oral communication2) Early training and - Dramatic Arts through language clubs and dramatic arts development in Language - Academic Achievement develop confidence and facility of language.3) Creative giftedness - Campus Politics Academic and campus leadership contribute4) Honing of Thinking Skills in shaping the dynamic personalities of5) Campus and Academic future great teachers. Leadership
  44. 44. Figure 11. Developmental Patterns & Influences of Outstanding Academics I. Childhood Patterns III. Career Level and Influences II. Adolescence and - Natural Interest and Young Adulthood Love for Learning -Continuous Training and Development (Avid Reading, Natural -Honing of Thinking Curiosity, Storytelling, I Skills -Innovation and nterest in Natural Creation of New -Development of Science) Knowledge Communication Skills - Early development - Academic - Campus and of Language Skills Leadership and Academic Leadership Community Service -Creative Giftedness
  45. 45. Selective codingSorting of Memos and Putting it all Together
  46. 46. Figure 12. SELECTIVE CODING PROCESS Emergent Categories Major Categories • Development of PotentialSORTING OF ACCOMPANYING • Personal Philosophy ofMEMOS: Learning (Responsibility &1.Teaching as a sacred Accountability for Studentmission to cultivate full Learninghuman potential. • Promoting a culture of1.Teaching as Science (body Excellenceand system of • Making subject matter aliveknowledge), Art (Creative, innovative methods and interesting& approaches), & • Learner-centerednessSpirituality(meaningful, transformativeinner processes). • Professional/personal1.Teacher as Attributes, Valuesinteresting, inspiring role Competencemodel, mentor, and facilitatorof great learning. (Committed, Disciplined, Ethical Interesting, Witty, Compelling)
  47. 47. Figure 13. Framework for the Process of Becoming an Outstanding Academicanchored on Purpose, Process, and Personhood Cultivating a deep sense of PURPOSE •Human Advancement to Full Potential • Personal Philosophy of Learning •Taking responsibility and accountability for student learning ROLE MENTOR MODEL Evolving a Engagement in Effective, High sense of OUTSTANDING Meaningful, Professional PERSONHOOD ACADEMIC Teaching PRACTICE • Professional Values/ • Teaching as Science, Art, Competence and Spirituality • Committed, Disciplined, GREAT •Learner-Centeredness • Ethical TEACHER •Creating a Culture of Excellence •Interesting & Compelling •Making subject matter alive and interesting
  48. 48. Figure 14. DEVELOPING THE STORYLINE of EMERGENT THEORY “BEYOND TEACHING” BECOMING AN OUTSTANDING ACADEMIC (CORE CATEGORY) Major Category Major Category Major Category EVOLVING A HIGH CULTIVATING A DEEP ENGAGEMENT IN EFFECTIVE, SENSE OF SENSE OF PURPOSE MEANINGFUL, PERSONHOOD PROFESSIONAL TEACHING “THE MENTOR” PRACTICE “THE ROLE MODEL” “THE GREAT TEACHER“ • Human Advancement to • Professional Values/ •Teaching as Science, Art, Competence and Spirituality Full Potential • Committed & Disciplined •Learner-Centeredness • Personal Philosophy of • Honest, Just, Fair, Ethical •Creating a Culture of Learning • Taking Responsibility & •Interesting & Compelling Excellence •Making Subject Matter Accountability for Student Alive and Interesting LearningDEVELOPMENTAL PATTERNS & INFLUENCES OF OUTSTANDING TEACHERS
  49. 49. FORMULATING THE THE EMERGENT THEORY“Beyond  Beyond teaching, becoming an outstanding academic is responding to a sense of higherTeaching” purpose that cultivates habits of heart and mind that define Personhood and drive the educative Process to the highest degree of effectiveness and proficiency.  Beyond teaching, becoming an outstanding academic is developing students to become their very best selves through mentoring, modeling, and employing the best pedagogical methods in the interdisciplinary fields of Science, Art, and Spirituality to ensure learning effectiveness towards expansion of the mind and the elevation of heart and soul.
  50. 50. (Con’t.)“Beyond  Becoming an outstanding academic suggests a developmental process way before one becomes aTeaching” teacher in the early cultivation of a child’s imaginational, intellectual, and language capacities and the development of inner sensibilities through the arts and the humanities.  In young adulthood, it suggests further personality development and confidence building through extra- curricular activities, academic achievement and campus leadership.  At the career level, outstanding academics are characterized by innovation and creation of new knowledge and devote time in furthering the industry through educational leadership and community service.
  51. 51. Excerpts from interview of a Master Teacher that embody the propositions of Purpose, Personhood, and Practice in the emergent theory “Beyond Teaching:Incident #86. “After intensive training inside our studio and on "living sets", theyreready and excited to join the professional work force of the motionpicture industries. Theyve been taught to be collaborative; tonegotiate rather than compromise; to discern the sheep from thewolves; to protect each other from exploiters and temptations ofgreed and ambition; to make a difference for the good; to point thecamera where their hearts beat; and to respect and love theiraudiences. Even better, theyre eager to share with their audiences, notjust what theyve learned, but, more importantly, what theyveexperienced, both good and "bad". For me, its been a humbling privilegeto be a part of their development as storytellers onscreen. We are oneanothers teachers and students for life!”
  52. 52. Implications for Philippine Higher Education The findings of the study offer fresh insights into the development of the following aspects of education: 1) Curricular review and reforms in teacher education. 1) Professional in-service training at various levels of teaching proficiency. 1) Admissions criteria for entry level teachers. 1) Evaluation standards for assessing teacher performance and teaching quality
  53. 53. INTEGRATING ARTS IN THE CURRICULUM
  54. 54.  How do we develop suchminds? How do schools preparestudents for the globalworkplace?
  55. 55. ART IS A WHOLE-BRAIN PROCESS CREATIVE IDEA Logical Visual Factual Holistic Critical Intuitive Technical Innovative A Analytical Conceptual D Quantitative Imaginative Conservative Interpersonal B Structured Kinesthetic C Sequential Emotional Organized Spiritual Detailed Sensory Planned Feeling CREATIVE EXPRESSION
  56. 56. ART AS TOOL FOR LEARNING Knowledge Objectives 1) Learn and develop appreciation for creative and effective problem solving techniques 2) Appreciation of art as effective vehicle for abstraction / distillation of values and principles that can be applied to various aspects of life
  57. 57. ART AS TOOL FOR LEARNING DEVELOPMENT OF SKILLS & COMPETENCIES 1) development of multi-sensory learning 2) harness elements of effective problem solving through the development of: (INNER •SENSITIVITY REFLECTION, EXPANDED AWARENESS, HEIGHTENED • EMPATHY ALERTNESS • CONNECTEDNESS READY INTEGRATION OF SIMULTANEOUS INPUTS • COMPASSION ABSTRACTION OF VALUES ANDPRINCIPLES)
  58. 58. ART AS TOOL FOR LEARNING DEVELOPMENT OF VALUES & ATTITUDES development and appreciation of universal core values through self-mastery and connectedness with the deeper self, others and the world
  59. 59. TOTAL EXPERIENCE CONCEPT VERBAL, VISUAL / SPATIAL, MOVEMENT, MUSICAL / RHYTHMIC(POETRY) (PAINTING) (DANCE) (MUSIC) TO READILY INTEGRATE SIMULTANEOUS INPUTS AND CREATE TOTAL EFFECT HOLISTIC & RELATIONAL
  60. 60. Educational Research Findings: ART IS A PRIMARY COMPONENT OF SUPERIOR TEACHING! EDUCATIONAL VALUES IMPACT OF ARTS ON STUDENT LEARNING & DEVELOPMENT: Informative Educative  INTUITIVE INSIGHT  REFLECTIVE JUDGMENT CREATIVE VALUES CREATIVE IMAGINATION Methods Approaches AESTHETIC SENSIBILITIESDEVELOPMENTAL VALUESCreative, Innovative, Integrative, Transformative
  61. 61. LEARNING VALUES DERIVED FROM ART CREATIVE/INNOVATIVE THINKING Logical Visual LOGIC Factual Holistic POSSIBILITIESCRITICAL Critical InnovativeTHINKING Technical INTEGRATION/ ConceptualGENRE, FORM, Intuitive TOTAL PICTURESTYLE, A Analytical D ImaginativeSTRUCTURE Quantitative B Interpersonal Conservative C Structured Kinesthetic Sequential Emotional Organized Spiritual FACTS/ Detailed Sensory PEOPLE DETAILS Planned Feeling SENSITIVITY/ DISCIPLINE/ INNER TECHNIQUE REFLECTION, INNER TRAINING AWARENESS ORIGINALITY STYLE/ CONNECTIVITY INTERPRETATION COLLABORATION, GR
  62. 62. WHERE’S THE FIT?(UNDERSTANDING THE SPIRIT & NEEDS OF THE TIME) + (SUPERIOR TEACHING) +(ARTS IN THE CURRICULUM) = 21ST CENTURY GLOBAL TEACHING AND LEARNING The Ethical Mind (Universal Values) The Respectful Mind (Inclusive/Unitive) The Creating Mind (Innovation) The Synthesizing Mind (Systemic) The Disciplined Mind (Domain Mastery)
  63. 63. “A teacher affects eternity;he can never tell where hisinfluence stops.” ~Henry Adams

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