Decision Making for the (Seemingly) Decided           Jeff Malone and Kerry Kincanon        University Exploratory Studies...
Session Agenda and Learning Outcomes• Motivation for session• Learn about exploration strategies and resources• Consider a...
How We Decide…“There is no universal solution to theproblem of decision-making. The realworld is just too complex. As ares...
Our Context: Exploratory StudentsVirginia Gordon’s Types of Exploring Students*• Information seeking – those with a need t...
Our Context: Person-Environment Fit• John Holland’s  Theory of  Vocational Type*• There are types of  people and types of ...
Our Context: A Transformational, Meaning-Making Model1. Advisors can help students negotiate the disorientingdilemma of be...
Our Context: A Transformational, Meaning-Making Model4. Advisors can help students explore situations where they cantry on...
Our Context: A Decision Making Model                 Assess yourself                                         Explore acade...
A Decision Making Toolbox“…it’s okay not to have an answer, but it’s not okay to stop looking for one.”  -Po Bronson, What...
A (seemingly) decided student: Seeds of doubt•   The student: Maria•   The story•   The dilemma•   Advisee-Advisor strateg...
A (seemingly) decided student: A new wrinkleCaleb is a second-year student majoring in Biochemistry with       • Thean eye...
A (seemingly) decided student: Good fit, but which option?Maddie is finishing her first year within a General Engineering ...
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Decision making for the (seemingly) decided

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Jeff Malone and Kerry Kincanon, advisors for the University Exploratory Studies Program at Oregon State University, share exploration strategies and discuss how they might be applied to decision-making dilemmas experienced by declared majors

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Decision making for the (seemingly) decided

  1. 1. Decision Making for the (Seemingly) Decided Jeff Malone and Kerry Kincanon University Exploratory Studies Program Oregon State University Jeff.Malone@oregonstate.edu Kerry.Kincanon@oregonstate.edu
  2. 2. Session Agenda and Learning Outcomes• Motivation for session• Learn about exploration strategies and resources• Consider applicability of strategies and resources to a variety of advising situations• Unpack the potential negotiations with doubt, nuance, and choice that advisees experience relative to their academic path
  3. 3. How We Decide…“There is no universal solution to theproblem of decision-making. The realworld is just too complex. As aresult, natural selection endowed us with abrain that is enthusiastically pluralistic.Sometimes we need to reason through ouroptions and carefully analyzepossibilities. And sometimes we need tolisten to our emotions.” Jonah Lehrer, HowWe Decide (p. xvi)
  4. 4. Our Context: Exploratory StudentsVirginia Gordon’s Types of Exploring Students*• Information seeking – those with a need to learn more about themselves, majors, and/or careers.• Dependent decision makers – those still learning how to make their own decisions• Vocationally/Academically immature – those who have little or no context for understanding careers and/or majors• Vocationally fixated –those focused on the relationship between college and career• Indecisive – those fearful of making the wrong choice• Apathetic – those who don’t care to make a decision• High achieving –those who are good in several areas often have trouble narrowing their focus• “Forced” explorers – those for whom academic performance or some other factor or revelation has negated their initial choice (Business, Engineering, Pre- professional programs, etc.) *Gordon, V. N.(1997). Advising undecided/exploratory students. In M. Hoveland, E. Anderson, W. McGuire, D. Crockett, & J. Kaufmann (Eds.), Academic Advising for Student Success and Retention (pp. 201-205). Iowa City, IA: Noel Levitz
  5. 5. Our Context: Person-Environment Fit• John Holland’s Theory of Vocational Type*• There are types of people and types of environments – people who seek environment congruent with their type are more likely to be satisfied and successful• “Are you? Can you? Do you like to?”*Holland, J.L. (1966). The psychology of vocational choice. Waltham; MA :Blaisdell
  6. 6. Our Context: A Transformational, Meaning-Making Model1. Advisors can help students negotiate the disorientingdilemma of being undecided about a major.2. Advisors can help students examine what theirundecidedness means in terms of their identity and experiences,inside and outside of the classroom, and assess assumptions,predispositions, or anxieties they might have which may enhanceor inhibit change.3. Advisors can help students explore available and pertinentinformation that may influence their decision and position themto take on a new role and/or identity.Kincanon, K. (2009). Translating the Transformative: Applying Transformational and Self-Authorship Pedagogy toAdvising Undecided/Exploring Students. Retrieved -insert todays date- from the NACADA Clearinghouse of AcademicAdvising Resources Web site:http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Clearinghouse/AdvisingIssues/Transformative-Theory.htm
  7. 7. Our Context: A Transformational, Meaning-Making Model4. Advisors can help students explore situations where they cantry on new roles and build confidence as they move toward theirdecision.5. Advisors can help students reflect on their learning andsynthesize information into a concrete decision about major.6. Advisors can help students to transition into their new roleand can continue to serve as a resource for students as theyencounter other possible transformations.Kincanon, K. (2009). Translating the Transformative: Applying Transformational and Self-Authorship Pedagogy toAdvising Undecided/Exploring Students. Retrieved -insert todays date- from the NACADA Clearinghouse of AcademicAdvising Resources Web site:http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Clearinghouse/AdvisingIssues/Transformative-Theory.htm
  8. 8. Our Context: A Decision Making Model Assess yourself Explore academic & career options Decide and act8March 18, 2012
  9. 9. A Decision Making Toolbox“…it’s okay not to have an answer, but it’s not okay to stop looking for one.” -Po Bronson, What Should I Do With My Life (p. 29)• “Experience matters”• “Human Resources”• “Related Links”
  10. 10. A (seemingly) decided student: Seeds of doubt• The student: Maria• The story• The dilemma• Advisee-Advisor strategy• Student action• Reflection and decision
  11. 11. A (seemingly) decided student: A new wrinkleCaleb is a second-year student majoring in Biochemistry with • Thean eye toward working in a health profession. He comes from Dilemmaa family of health care practitioners and complete extensiveinformational interviews and job shadows in high school. He • Possibleeven has strong lead on a preceptorship in the upcoming Advisee-summer. He has done well academically across the board and Advisorhas the looks of a strong candidate for professional school. To Strategymeet a general education requirement, he has opted to takean Introduction to Health Care Systems class, also a commonstarter class for Public Health majors. You are his Biochem • Idealadvisor, and when he comes to see you, he raves about how studentmuch he loves the class. He notes that he feels guilty because actionhe finds this class more appealing than his science classes thisterm.
  12. 12. A (seemingly) decided student: Good fit, but which option?Maddie is finishing her first year within a General Engineering • Themajor. She is fascinated with processes and how things work. DilemmaIn high school she demonstrated excellent quantitative andanalytic abilities. Her school counselors, high school • Possibleinstructors, and family members all suggested she consider Advisee-attending a school with a strong Engineering program. Maddie Advisorhas successfully negotiated the required first year curriculum Strategyso far and carries a 3.70 GPA into her third quarter. She hasenrolled in and enjoyed two general engineering orientationcourses as well as actively participated in her school’s • IdealEngineering Awareness Week. You are her General StudentEngineering advisor. She comes to you because she is having Actiontrouble locking down the specific Engineering discipline shewants to pursue, which is a requirement for her by the start ofher second year. Her family is proud of her achievements, butthey are eager for her to decide on a path within Engineering.
  13. 13. Questions?

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