Investigative reporting by Joanne Lisosky

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Investigative reporting by Joanne Lisosky

  1. 1. Imagine the Possibilities<br />Investigative Reporting <br />Day One<br />
  2. 2. Definition: Investigative Reporting<br />All reporting contains elements of investigating<br />Also called: in-depth, enterprising, explanatory journalism<br />Often shines a light on corruption<br />Requires significant time and effort<br />Incorporates rigorous research techniques<br />Needs many primary and secondary source interviews<br />Questions how things are and how things should be…<br />Imagines the possibilities… journalism can contribute to positive change <br />
  3. 3. THREE-DAY WORKSHOP<br />DAY ONE: DEVELOPING THE STORY <br />DAY TWO: GATHERING INFORMATION AND WRITING THE STORY<br />DAY THREE: PRESENTING THE STORY<br />
  4. 4. WHO HAS DESIGNED AND DEVELOPED INVESTIGATIVE STORIES?<br />What was the story?<br />What were you biggest challenges?<br />What were you greatest successes?<br />Suggestions for colleagues…<br />
  5. 5. Investigative Reporting asks:<br />How is the system supposed to work?<br />Why doesn’t it work this way now?<br />Who benefits from the system NOT working?<br />Who is hurt when the systems doesn’t work?<br />What can be done to fix this system?<br />
  6. 6. Generating ideas…<br />Find a story focus:<br />Uncovering story must be feasible<br />Must be easy to explain<br /> one-minute speech/25 words<br />Story idea contains questions answered by PEOPLE and DATA<br />But must be character and NOT data driven<br />
  7. 7. EXAMPLES: What people and data did they use?<br />AZERBAIJAN (2008)<br />http://www.icfj.org/OurWork/EasternEuropeCentralAsia/AZAJA/tabid/500/Default.aspx<br />USA<br />Investigative Reporters and Editors<br />http://www.ire.org/extraextra/<br />Center for Investigative Reporting<br />http://centerforinvestigativereporting.org/articles/whencancopsgainaccesstomypersonalinfoonfacebook<br />
  8. 8. Generating ideas…<br />Investigating government <br />Investigating the courts <br />Investigating police<br />Investigating education<br />Investigating businesses<br />Investigating religious and non-profits (NGOs) Investigating financial institutions<br />Investigating health care<br />Investigating utility companies<br />Investigating transportation<br />Investigating environmental issues<br />Investigating real estate<br />Investigating journalism practices/media law<br />
  9. 9. Fundamental questions…<br />Money—who has it, who doesn’t and why<br />Relationships—officials/non-officials, supervisors/subordinates<br />Physical and psychological issues and abuses<br />Licensing—who can and who can’t<br />Changes and trends in the community<br />Mistakes or errors made by organizations that have been covered up<br />
  10. 10. Investigative Reporting is MORE<br />Not just what’s happening—but why<br />Not just who’s corrupt—but how<br />Not just rumors—but facts<br />Not just the negative aspects of the story—but how to fix it!<br />
  11. 11. What are the stories that are crying to be investigated?<br />How do you determine what needs to be investigated?<br />Identify 5 stories<br />Write one-minute speech and 25 words explaining each story<br />What are you investigating?<br />Map the power structure of the primary area your are investigating. Ie. What is the power structure (Names and position) of the education system in this country.<br />
  12. 12. May be multi-dimensional and not linear…<br />
  13. 13. Tomorrow<br />Digging in on your primary investigative story…<br />

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