SlideShare a Scribd company logo

gravity report

report on gravity

gravity report

1 of 17
Download to read offline
REPORT ON GRAVITY
HISTORY OF GRAVITY:
The understanding and exploration of gravity have a long history that dates back to ancient
civilizations. Here is a brief overview of the historical developments in our understanding of
gravity.
SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION AND NEWTON:
 The modern understanding of gravity began to take
shape during the scientific revolution in the 16th and
17th centuries. Galileo Galilei conducted experiments on falling objects and
demonstrated that all objects, regardless of their mass, fall towards the Earth at the
same rate (discounting the effects of air resistance).
 Sir Isaac Newton, in the late 17th century, developed his laws of motion and the law
of universal gravitation. Newton's law of universal gravitation stated that every
particle in the universe attracts every other particle with a
force that is directly proportional to their masses and
inversely proportional to the square of the distance
between them.
 Newton's laws of motion and his law of universal
gravitation provided a comprehensive framework for understanding and calculating
the motion of objects under the influence of gravity. This laid the foundation for
classical mechanics and revolutionized the field of physics.
REFINEMENTS AND ADVANCEMENTS:
 In the 19th century, advancements in astronomy and celestial mechanics led to more
precise measurements of planetary motion. Johann Kepler's laws of planetary motion,
combined with Newton's laws of motion and gravitation, provided a deeper
understanding of the dynamics of celestial bodies.
 Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity,
published in 1915, revolutionized our understanding
of gravity. General relativity describes gravity as
the curvature of space-time caused by mass and
energy. It provided a new framework for
understanding gravity's behavior in extreme
conditions, such as near black holes or during the
expansion of the universe.
 Since Einstein, the study of gravity has continued to evolve through theoretical
advancements and experimental observations. Modern theories, such as quantum
gravity, attempt to reconcile general relativity with quantum mechanics to provide a
unified theory of gravity at the smallest scales.
The understanding of gravity has evolved significantly throughout history, from ancient
philosophical speculations to the precise mathematical descriptions of Newton and the
revolutionary insights of Einstein. The ongoing research and exploration in the field continue
to deepen our understanding of gravity's fundamental nature and its role in the workings of
the universe.
GRAVITY:
Gravity is a fundamental force of nature that governs the attraction between objects with
mass or energy. It is responsible for holding planets in orbit around stars, moons in orbit
around planets, and objects on Earth's surface.
The standard value for "small g" on the surface of the Earth is
approximately 9.8 meters per second squared (m/s²). This
means that when an object is in free fall near the Earth's
surface, it accelerates at a rate of approximately 9.8 m/s²
towards the center of the Earth due to the force of gravity.
It's important to note that "small g" is an acceleration and
should not be confused with "big G," which represents the
gravitational constant in the law of universal gravitation (as mentioned in the previous
response).
VALUE OF GRAVITY:
The value of gravity refers to the acceleration due to gravity, which is a constant value that
determines the strength of the gravitational force between two objects. On Earth, the average
value of the acceleration due to gravity is approximately 9.8
meters per second squared (m/s²).
This means that when an object near the surface of the Earth
is in free fall, it accelerates at a rate of 9.8 m/s² towards the
center of the Earth. This acceleration is often represented by
the symbol "g" and is commonly rounded to 9.8 m/s² for
simplicity in calculations.
DEPENDING:
It's important to note that the value of gravity can vary depending on the location and altitude
on Earth's surface. For example, at higher altitudes, the value of gravity is slightly lower due
to the increased distance from the center of the Earth. Additionally, gravity can vary on
different celestial bodies based on their mass and size.
In scientific calculations and formulas involving gravity, the precise value of the acceleration
due to gravity (g) is used, which can be measured more accurately through experimentation
and calculations.
RELATION OF GRAVITY WITH WEIGHT:
Gravity and weight are closely related concepts. Weight is the force exerted on an object due
to gravity. It is the measure of the gravitational force acting on an object's mass.
The weight of an object can be calculated using the formula:
Weight = mass * acceleration due to gravity
In this formula, the mass of the object is multiplied by the acceleration due to gravity to
determine the force of gravity acting on the object, which is its
weight. The acceleration due to gravity is represented by the
symbol "g" and has an average value of approximately 9.8 m/s²
on Earth's surface.
EXAMPLE:
So, if you have the mass of an object, you can determine its weight by multiplying the mass
by the acceleration due to gravity. For example, if an object has a mass of 10 kilograms on
Earth, its weight would be:
Weight = 10 kg * 9.8 m/s² = 98 Newton
Therefore, the weight of the object would be 98 newton.
It's important to note that weight is a force and is measured in newton (N), whereas mass is a
measure of the amount of matter in an object and is typically measured in kilograms (kg).
Weight can vary depending on the strength of gravity at a particular location or on different
celestial bodies, whereas mass remains constant regardless of the gravitational field.
LAW OF GRAVITATIONAL FORCE:
According to Isaac Newton's law of universal gravitation, the force of gravity between two
objects is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to
the square of the distance between them. Mathematically, it can be expressed as:
Where:
- F is the force of gravity between the two objects.
- G is the gravitational constant (approximately 6.67430 × 10^-11 N (m/kg) ^2).
- m1 and m2 are the masses of the two objects.
- R is the distance between the centers of the two objects.
Gravity is responsible for keeping celestial bodies in their respective orbits and also
determines the weight of objects on Earth's surface. It is a fundamental force that plays a
crucial role in shaping the structure and behavior of the universe.
GRAVITATIONAL FIELD STRENGTH
The gravitational field strength, denoted by "g" or "g-field," represents the magnitude of the
gravitational field at a specific point. It is defined as the force experienced per unit mass by
an object placed at that point. The gravitational field
strength is given by:
g = F / m
Where:
 g is the gravitational field strength.
 F is the gravitational force experienced by the mass.
 m is the mass of the object experiencing the gravitational field.
The direction of the gravitational field is always towards the center of the mass creating the
field. In other words, it points in the direction of the gravitational force that an object would
experience if placed at that point.
In summary, gravitational force describes the attraction between masses, while the
gravitational field represents the influence of gravity in space. The gravitational field
determines the force experienced by objects with mass within that field.
GRAVITATIONAL POTENTIAL:
The concept of gravitational potential is closely related to the concept of gravitational field
strength. The field strength (g) at a point is the rate of change of gravitational potential with
distance:
This relationship helps determine the gravitational force experienced by an object at a given
point, as the force is proportional to the field strength.
In summary, gravitational potential is a measure of the potential energy per unit mass
associated with an object in a gravitational field. It quantifies the work done to bring an
object from infinity to a specific location and is an essential concept in understanding the
behavior of objects in the presence of gravity.
EINSTEIN’S VIEW ON GRAVITY
Albert Einstein revolutionized our understanding of gravity with his theory of general
relativity, which he proposed in 1915.
Einstein's view of gravity significantly differed
from the classical Newtonian understanding.
According to Einstein's general theory of
relativity, gravity is not simply a force acting at a distance, as described by Newton's law of
universal gravitation. Instead, Einstein proposed that gravity arises due to the curvature of
space time caused by the presence of mass and energy.

Recommended

Gravitation, free fall, variation in 'g' and keplers law lecture wise
Gravitation, free fall, variation in 'g' and keplers law lecture wiseGravitation, free fall, variation in 'g' and keplers law lecture wise
Gravitation, free fall, variation in 'g' and keplers law lecture wiseRohan Jain
 
Hukum Newton Gravitasi
Hukum Newton GravitasiHukum Newton Gravitasi
Hukum Newton GravitasiAlfido Zakaria
 
Gravity and orbits
Gravity and orbitsGravity and orbits
Gravity and orbitsmlanau5
 
3gravitation-181206145827 (1).pdf
3gravitation-181206145827 (1).pdf3gravitation-181206145827 (1).pdf
3gravitation-181206145827 (1).pdfMOHDHAMZAKHAN6
 

More Related Content

Similar to gravity report (20)

Ch-10 GRAVITATION.pptx
Ch-10 GRAVITATION.pptxCh-10 GRAVITATION.pptx
Ch-10 GRAVITATION.pptx
 
3gravitation-181206145827-converted.pptx
3gravitation-181206145827-converted.pptx3gravitation-181206145827-converted.pptx
3gravitation-181206145827-converted.pptx
 
Universal Gravitation PPP
Universal Gravitation PPPUniversal Gravitation PPP
Universal Gravitation PPP
 
Gravitaion notes.pdf
Gravitaion notes.pdfGravitaion notes.pdf
Gravitaion notes.pdf
 
Gravitation theory
Gravitation theoryGravitation theory
Gravitation theory
 
Chap 10
Chap 10Chap 10
Chap 10
 
Iesc110
Iesc110Iesc110
Iesc110
 
Gravitation.pptx
Gravitation.pptxGravitation.pptx
Gravitation.pptx
 
gravity.ppt
gravity.pptgravity.ppt
gravity.ppt
 
Gravity
GravityGravity
Gravity
 
Gravity
GravityGravity
Gravity
 
universal gravitation
universal gravitationuniversal gravitation
universal gravitation
 
Gravitation class 9
Gravitation class 9Gravitation class 9
Gravitation class 9
 
GRAVITATION FULL CHAPTER.pptx
GRAVITATION FULL CHAPTER.pptxGRAVITATION FULL CHAPTER.pptx
GRAVITATION FULL CHAPTER.pptx
 
Relativity english
Relativity englishRelativity english
Relativity english
 
Relativity english
Relativity englishRelativity english
Relativity english
 
Gravitation ppt.pdf
Gravitation ppt.pdfGravitation ppt.pdf
Gravitation ppt.pdf
 
Newtons-Law-of-Universal-Gravitation.pdf
Newtons-Law-of-Universal-Gravitation.pdfNewtons-Law-of-Universal-Gravitation.pdf
Newtons-Law-of-Universal-Gravitation.pdf
 
Phy PPT.pptx
Phy PPT.pptxPhy PPT.pptx
Phy PPT.pptx
 
Ch 13 universal gravitation1
Ch 13 universal gravitation1Ch 13 universal gravitation1
Ch 13 universal gravitation1
 

Recently uploaded

BRINDHA G AD21012 SELF INTRODUCTION.pdf
BRINDHA G  AD21012 SELF INTRODUCTION.pdfBRINDHA G  AD21012 SELF INTRODUCTION.pdf
BRINDHA G AD21012 SELF INTRODUCTION.pdfbrindhaaids12
 
Eversendai - HSE Performance Management Systems-R1.pptx
Eversendai - HSE Performance Management Systems-R1.pptxEversendai - HSE Performance Management Systems-R1.pptx
Eversendai - HSE Performance Management Systems-R1.pptxADILRASHID54
 
Metrology Measurements and All units PPT
Metrology Measurements and  All units PPTMetrology Measurements and  All units PPT
Metrology Measurements and All units PPTdinesh babu
 
sahana sri D AD21046 SELF INTRODUCTION.pdf
sahana sri D AD21046 SELF INTRODUCTION.pdfsahana sri D AD21046 SELF INTRODUCTION.pdf
sahana sri D AD21046 SELF INTRODUCTION.pdfsahanaaids46
 
SATHVIKA A AD21049 SELF INTRODUCTION.pdf
SATHVIKA A AD21049 SELF INTRODUCTION.pdfSATHVIKA A AD21049 SELF INTRODUCTION.pdf
SATHVIKA A AD21049 SELF INTRODUCTION.pdfSathvikaAlagar
 
ROBOT PERCEPTION FOR AGRICULTURE AND GOOD PRODUCTION1.1.pdf
ROBOT PERCEPTION FOR AGRICULTURE AND GOOD PRODUCTION1.1.pdfROBOT PERCEPTION FOR AGRICULTURE AND GOOD PRODUCTION1.1.pdf
ROBOT PERCEPTION FOR AGRICULTURE AND GOOD PRODUCTION1.1.pdfRudraPratapSingh871925
 
Earthquake Precursor Detection: Technological challenges and opportunities
Earthquake Precursor Detection:  Technological challenges and opportunitiesEarthquake Precursor Detection:  Technological challenges and opportunities
Earthquake Precursor Detection: Technological challenges and opportunitiesManojKumar5547
 
Eshpetco I LUKOIL Training Certificate I 2017
Eshpetco I LUKOIL Training Certificate I 2017Eshpetco I LUKOIL Training Certificate I 2017
Eshpetco I LUKOIL Training Certificate I 2017Abdelrahman Al-Gammal
 
BCS302-Module 3 -DDCO-Computer structure-VTU 2022 scheme-BCS302.pdf
BCS302-Module 3 -DDCO-Computer structure-VTU 2022 scheme-BCS302.pdfBCS302-Module 3 -DDCO-Computer structure-VTU 2022 scheme-BCS302.pdf
BCS302-Module 3 -DDCO-Computer structure-VTU 2022 scheme-BCS302.pdfciyamala kushbu
 
Petrogulf Misr I PICO International Training Certificate I 2016
Petrogulf Misr I PICO International Training Certificate I 2016Petrogulf Misr I PICO International Training Certificate I 2016
Petrogulf Misr I PICO International Training Certificate I 2016Abdelrahman Al-Gammal
 
STATE EXAMS 4000 ONE LINERS TOTHEPOINTBYDHYANPAL.pdf
STATE EXAMS 4000 ONE LINERS TOTHEPOINTBYDHYANPAL.pdfSTATE EXAMS 4000 ONE LINERS TOTHEPOINTBYDHYANPAL.pdf
STATE EXAMS 4000 ONE LINERS TOTHEPOINTBYDHYANPAL.pdfpraveenkumar620098
 
Python Workshop Day - 03.pptx
Python Workshop Day - 03.pptxPython Workshop Day - 03.pptx
Python Workshop Day - 03.pptxShivanshSeth6
 
GWU_DRONE AND AI HOW DRONE AND AI RELATED
GWU_DRONE AND AI HOW DRONE AND AI RELATEDGWU_DRONE AND AI HOW DRONE AND AI RELATED
GWU_DRONE AND AI HOW DRONE AND AI RELATEDimman gwu
 
20CE501PE – INDUSTRIAL WASTE MANAGEMENT.ppt
20CE501PE – INDUSTRIAL WASTE MANAGEMENT.ppt20CE501PE – INDUSTRIAL WASTE MANAGEMENT.ppt
20CE501PE – INDUSTRIAL WASTE MANAGEMENT.pptMohanumar S
 
Pharaonic Petroleum Company I BP Training Certificate I 2017
Pharaonic Petroleum Company I BP Training Certificate I 2017Pharaonic Petroleum Company I BP Training Certificate I 2017
Pharaonic Petroleum Company I BP Training Certificate I 2017Abdelrahman Al-Gammal
 
MODULE 2.pptx UNIT 1 BT AMD ME.pdf Engineering
MODULE 2.pptx UNIT 1 BT AMD ME.pdf EngineeringMODULE 2.pptx UNIT 1 BT AMD ME.pdf Engineering
MODULE 2.pptx UNIT 1 BT AMD ME.pdf Engineeringakholmes2104
 
Power point Burnt Inverted Earthen Pots Final 2018 01-3-18 Junaid.pptx
Power point  Burnt Inverted Earthen Pots Final 2018 01-3-18 Junaid.pptxPower point  Burnt Inverted Earthen Pots Final 2018 01-3-18 Junaid.pptx
Power point Burnt Inverted Earthen Pots Final 2018 01-3-18 Junaid.pptxhassanalizafar
 

Recently uploaded (20)

BRINDHA G AD21012 SELF INTRODUCTION.pdf
BRINDHA G  AD21012 SELF INTRODUCTION.pdfBRINDHA G  AD21012 SELF INTRODUCTION.pdf
BRINDHA G AD21012 SELF INTRODUCTION.pdf
 
Eversendai - HSE Performance Management Systems-R1.pptx
Eversendai - HSE Performance Management Systems-R1.pptxEversendai - HSE Performance Management Systems-R1.pptx
Eversendai - HSE Performance Management Systems-R1.pptx
 
Metrology Measurements and All units PPT
Metrology Measurements and  All units PPTMetrology Measurements and  All units PPT
Metrology Measurements and All units PPT
 
sahana sri D AD21046 SELF INTRODUCTION.pdf
sahana sri D AD21046 SELF INTRODUCTION.pdfsahana sri D AD21046 SELF INTRODUCTION.pdf
sahana sri D AD21046 SELF INTRODUCTION.pdf
 
SATHVIKA A AD21049 SELF INTRODUCTION.pdf
SATHVIKA A AD21049 SELF INTRODUCTION.pdfSATHVIKA A AD21049 SELF INTRODUCTION.pdf
SATHVIKA A AD21049 SELF INTRODUCTION.pdf
 
ROBOT PERCEPTION FOR AGRICULTURE AND GOOD PRODUCTION1.1.pdf
ROBOT PERCEPTION FOR AGRICULTURE AND GOOD PRODUCTION1.1.pdfROBOT PERCEPTION FOR AGRICULTURE AND GOOD PRODUCTION1.1.pdf
ROBOT PERCEPTION FOR AGRICULTURE AND GOOD PRODUCTION1.1.pdf
 
Earthquake Precursor Detection: Technological challenges and opportunities
Earthquake Precursor Detection:  Technological challenges and opportunitiesEarthquake Precursor Detection:  Technological challenges and opportunities
Earthquake Precursor Detection: Technological challenges and opportunities
 
Eshpetco I LUKOIL Training Certificate I 2017
Eshpetco I LUKOIL Training Certificate I 2017Eshpetco I LUKOIL Training Certificate I 2017
Eshpetco I LUKOIL Training Certificate I 2017
 
BCS302-Module 3 -DDCO-Computer structure-VTU 2022 scheme-BCS302.pdf
BCS302-Module 3 -DDCO-Computer structure-VTU 2022 scheme-BCS302.pdfBCS302-Module 3 -DDCO-Computer structure-VTU 2022 scheme-BCS302.pdf
BCS302-Module 3 -DDCO-Computer structure-VTU 2022 scheme-BCS302.pdf
 
Mobile Hacking Unit 1
Mobile Hacking Unit 1Mobile Hacking Unit 1
Mobile Hacking Unit 1
 
Petrogulf Misr I PICO International Training Certificate I 2016
Petrogulf Misr I PICO International Training Certificate I 2016Petrogulf Misr I PICO International Training Certificate I 2016
Petrogulf Misr I PICO International Training Certificate I 2016
 
STATE EXAMS 4000 ONE LINERS TOTHEPOINTBYDHYANPAL.pdf
STATE EXAMS 4000 ONE LINERS TOTHEPOINTBYDHYANPAL.pdfSTATE EXAMS 4000 ONE LINERS TOTHEPOINTBYDHYANPAL.pdf
STATE EXAMS 4000 ONE LINERS TOTHEPOINTBYDHYANPAL.pdf
 
Python Workshop Day - 03.pptx
Python Workshop Day - 03.pptxPython Workshop Day - 03.pptx
Python Workshop Day - 03.pptx
 
GWU_DRONE AND AI HOW DRONE AND AI RELATED
GWU_DRONE AND AI HOW DRONE AND AI RELATEDGWU_DRONE AND AI HOW DRONE AND AI RELATED
GWU_DRONE AND AI HOW DRONE AND AI RELATED
 
20CE501PE – INDUSTRIAL WASTE MANAGEMENT.ppt
20CE501PE – INDUSTRIAL WASTE MANAGEMENT.ppt20CE501PE – INDUSTRIAL WASTE MANAGEMENT.ppt
20CE501PE – INDUSTRIAL WASTE MANAGEMENT.ppt
 
Pharaonic Petroleum Company I BP Training Certificate I 2017
Pharaonic Petroleum Company I BP Training Certificate I 2017Pharaonic Petroleum Company I BP Training Certificate I 2017
Pharaonic Petroleum Company I BP Training Certificate I 2017
 
MODULE 2.pptx UNIT 1 BT AMD ME.pdf Engineering
MODULE 2.pptx UNIT 1 BT AMD ME.pdf EngineeringMODULE 2.pptx UNIT 1 BT AMD ME.pdf Engineering
MODULE 2.pptx UNIT 1 BT AMD ME.pdf Engineering
 
Solar PPT.pdf
Solar PPT.pdfSolar PPT.pdf
Solar PPT.pdf
 
Power System - Types of Power Plants overview
Power System - Types of Power Plants  overviewPower System - Types of Power Plants  overview
Power System - Types of Power Plants overview
 
Power point Burnt Inverted Earthen Pots Final 2018 01-3-18 Junaid.pptx
Power point  Burnt Inverted Earthen Pots Final 2018 01-3-18 Junaid.pptxPower point  Burnt Inverted Earthen Pots Final 2018 01-3-18 Junaid.pptx
Power point Burnt Inverted Earthen Pots Final 2018 01-3-18 Junaid.pptx
 

gravity report

  • 1. REPORT ON GRAVITY HISTORY OF GRAVITY: The understanding and exploration of gravity have a long history that dates back to ancient civilizations. Here is a brief overview of the historical developments in our understanding of gravity. SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION AND NEWTON:  The modern understanding of gravity began to take shape during the scientific revolution in the 16th and 17th centuries. Galileo Galilei conducted experiments on falling objects and demonstrated that all objects, regardless of their mass, fall towards the Earth at the same rate (discounting the effects of air resistance).  Sir Isaac Newton, in the late 17th century, developed his laws of motion and the law of universal gravitation. Newton's law of universal gravitation stated that every particle in the universe attracts every other particle with a force that is directly proportional to their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.  Newton's laws of motion and his law of universal gravitation provided a comprehensive framework for understanding and calculating the motion of objects under the influence of gravity. This laid the foundation for classical mechanics and revolutionized the field of physics. REFINEMENTS AND ADVANCEMENTS:  In the 19th century, advancements in astronomy and celestial mechanics led to more precise measurements of planetary motion. Johann Kepler's laws of planetary motion, combined with Newton's laws of motion and gravitation, provided a deeper understanding of the dynamics of celestial bodies.
  • 2.  Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity, published in 1915, revolutionized our understanding of gravity. General relativity describes gravity as the curvature of space-time caused by mass and energy. It provided a new framework for understanding gravity's behavior in extreme conditions, such as near black holes or during the expansion of the universe.  Since Einstein, the study of gravity has continued to evolve through theoretical advancements and experimental observations. Modern theories, such as quantum gravity, attempt to reconcile general relativity with quantum mechanics to provide a unified theory of gravity at the smallest scales. The understanding of gravity has evolved significantly throughout history, from ancient philosophical speculations to the precise mathematical descriptions of Newton and the revolutionary insights of Einstein. The ongoing research and exploration in the field continue to deepen our understanding of gravity's fundamental nature and its role in the workings of the universe. GRAVITY: Gravity is a fundamental force of nature that governs the attraction between objects with mass or energy. It is responsible for holding planets in orbit around stars, moons in orbit around planets, and objects on Earth's surface. The standard value for "small g" on the surface of the Earth is approximately 9.8 meters per second squared (m/s²). This means that when an object is in free fall near the Earth's surface, it accelerates at a rate of approximately 9.8 m/s² towards the center of the Earth due to the force of gravity. It's important to note that "small g" is an acceleration and should not be confused with "big G," which represents the
  • 3. gravitational constant in the law of universal gravitation (as mentioned in the previous response). VALUE OF GRAVITY: The value of gravity refers to the acceleration due to gravity, which is a constant value that determines the strength of the gravitational force between two objects. On Earth, the average value of the acceleration due to gravity is approximately 9.8 meters per second squared (m/s²). This means that when an object near the surface of the Earth is in free fall, it accelerates at a rate of 9.8 m/s² towards the center of the Earth. This acceleration is often represented by the symbol "g" and is commonly rounded to 9.8 m/s² for simplicity in calculations. DEPENDING: It's important to note that the value of gravity can vary depending on the location and altitude on Earth's surface. For example, at higher altitudes, the value of gravity is slightly lower due to the increased distance from the center of the Earth. Additionally, gravity can vary on different celestial bodies based on their mass and size. In scientific calculations and formulas involving gravity, the precise value of the acceleration due to gravity (g) is used, which can be measured more accurately through experimentation and calculations. RELATION OF GRAVITY WITH WEIGHT: Gravity and weight are closely related concepts. Weight is the force exerted on an object due to gravity. It is the measure of the gravitational force acting on an object's mass. The weight of an object can be calculated using the formula: Weight = mass * acceleration due to gravity
  • 4. In this formula, the mass of the object is multiplied by the acceleration due to gravity to determine the force of gravity acting on the object, which is its weight. The acceleration due to gravity is represented by the symbol "g" and has an average value of approximately 9.8 m/s² on Earth's surface. EXAMPLE: So, if you have the mass of an object, you can determine its weight by multiplying the mass by the acceleration due to gravity. For example, if an object has a mass of 10 kilograms on Earth, its weight would be: Weight = 10 kg * 9.8 m/s² = 98 Newton Therefore, the weight of the object would be 98 newton. It's important to note that weight is a force and is measured in newton (N), whereas mass is a measure of the amount of matter in an object and is typically measured in kilograms (kg). Weight can vary depending on the strength of gravity at a particular location or on different celestial bodies, whereas mass remains constant regardless of the gravitational field. LAW OF GRAVITATIONAL FORCE: According to Isaac Newton's law of universal gravitation, the force of gravity between two objects is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. Mathematically, it can be expressed as: Where: - F is the force of gravity between the two objects.
  • 5. - G is the gravitational constant (approximately 6.67430 × 10^-11 N (m/kg) ^2). - m1 and m2 are the masses of the two objects. - R is the distance between the centers of the two objects. Gravity is responsible for keeping celestial bodies in their respective orbits and also determines the weight of objects on Earth's surface. It is a fundamental force that plays a crucial role in shaping the structure and behavior of the universe. GRAVITATIONAL FIELD STRENGTH The gravitational field strength, denoted by "g" or "g-field," represents the magnitude of the gravitational field at a specific point. It is defined as the force experienced per unit mass by an object placed at that point. The gravitational field strength is given by: g = F / m Where:  g is the gravitational field strength.  F is the gravitational force experienced by the mass.  m is the mass of the object experiencing the gravitational field. The direction of the gravitational field is always towards the center of the mass creating the field. In other words, it points in the direction of the gravitational force that an object would experience if placed at that point. In summary, gravitational force describes the attraction between masses, while the gravitational field represents the influence of gravity in space. The gravitational field determines the force experienced by objects with mass within that field.
  • 6. GRAVITATIONAL POTENTIAL: The concept of gravitational potential is closely related to the concept of gravitational field strength. The field strength (g) at a point is the rate of change of gravitational potential with distance: This relationship helps determine the gravitational force experienced by an object at a given point, as the force is proportional to the field strength. In summary, gravitational potential is a measure of the potential energy per unit mass associated with an object in a gravitational field. It quantifies the work done to bring an object from infinity to a specific location and is an essential concept in understanding the behavior of objects in the presence of gravity. EINSTEIN’S VIEW ON GRAVITY Albert Einstein revolutionized our understanding of gravity with his theory of general relativity, which he proposed in 1915. Einstein's view of gravity significantly differed from the classical Newtonian understanding. According to Einstein's general theory of relativity, gravity is not simply a force acting at a distance, as described by Newton's law of universal gravitation. Instead, Einstein proposed that gravity arises due to the curvature of space time caused by the presence of mass and energy.
  • 7. Einstein's theory states that massive objects, such as planets or stars, warp the fabric of space time around them. This warping of space time creates what we perceive as gravity. Essentially, objects with mass and energy tell space time how to curve, and the curved space time tells objects how to move. GENERAL THEORY OF RELATIVITY Einstein's general theory of relativity, often referred to as simply general relativity, is a theory of gravity proposed by Albert Einstein in 1915. It provides a new understanding of gravity that goes beyond Newtonian physics and has been incredibly successful in explaining various gravitational phenomena and cosmological observations. KEY PRINCIPLES OF GENERAL RELATIVITY: Equivalence Principle: The equivalence principle states that there is no difference between the effects of gravity and the effects of acceleration. In other words, the force of gravity experienced by an object is equivalent to the force experienced when the object is accelerated in the absence of gravity. 1. Curvature of Space-time: General relativity introduces the concept that mass and energy curve or deform the fabric of space time. The presence of mass and energy causes space-time to be curved, and objects moving within this curved space time follow curved paths. 2. Geodesics and Gravity: In general relativity, the motion of objects is determined by following the geodesics (the shortest paths) in curved space time. Objects move along the most efficient paths through the curved space time, which results in the appearance of gravitational attraction.
  • 8. 3. Gravitational Time Dilation: General relativity predicts that time passes at different rates in regions with different gravitational fields. Clocks in stronger gravitational fields appear to run slower compared to clocks in weaker gravitational fields. 4. Bending of Light: According to general relativity, the presence of mass and energy can cause the curvature of space-time, leading to the bending of light as it passes through the gravitational field. This effect has been confirmed by experiments and observations, such as the bending of starlight near the Sun during a solar eclipse. APPLICATIONS AND CONFIRMATIONS: General relativity has provided successful explanations for a range of phenomena and has been confirmed by numerous experimental tests and astronomical observations, including:  The precession of Mercury's orbit: General relativity correctly accounts for the observed discrepancy in the orbit of Mercury compared to predictions based on Newtonian physics.  Gravitational lensing: The bending of light by massive objects, such as galaxies or clusters of galaxies, has been observed and confirmed in line with the predictions of general relativity.  Time dilation and gravitational redshift: Precise experiments have confirmed the effects of time dilation and gravitational redshift, demonstrating the impact of gravity on the flow of time and the frequency of light.  Gravitational waves: In 2015, the first direct detection of gravitational waves, ripples in space time caused by the motion of massive objects, was made, providing direct evidence for the existence of these waves as predicted by general relativity. Overall, Einstein's general relativity revolutionized our understanding of gravity and remains one of the most successful and widely accepted physical theories to date. It has far-reaching implications for our understanding of the universe, from the behavior of black holes to the expansion of the universe on a cosmological scale.
  • 9. GRAVITY AND LIGHT: Gravity and light are interconnected in several ways according to Einstein's theory of general relativity. 1. Gravitational Lensing: Gravity can bend the path of light as it travels through a gravitational field. Massive objects, such as stars or galaxies, can act as lenses, causing the light from more distant objects to bend as it passes by. This phenomenon is known as gravitational lensing. It has been observed and confirmed, and it provides a way to study distant objects and test the predictions of general relativity. 2. Time Dilation and Frequency Shift: According to general relativity, the flow of time is affected by gravitational fields. In regions of stronger gravity, time passes more slowly compared to regions of weaker gravity. This means that light traveling through a gravitational field experiences a change in its frequency. This effect is known as gravitational redshift or blue shift, depending on whether the light is moving away from or towards the gravitational source, respectively. 3. Black Holes: Black holes are extremely massive objects that have such strong gravitational fields that nothing, including light, can escape their gravitational pull within a certain boundary called the event horizon. The concept of black holes arises from the predictions of general relativity. Light that approaches the event horizon of a black hole will be pulled in and cannot escape, leading to the formation of a dark region. 4. Gravitational Waves: Gravitational waves are ripples in space-time caused by the acceleration of massive objects. They travel at the speed of light and carry energy away from the source. The detection of gravitational waves
  • 10. provides direct evidence of the existence of these waves and confirms Einstein's predictions. Gravitational waves have been detected from the mergers of black holes and neutron stars, demonstrating the coupling between gravity and the propagation of light. In summary, gravity can bend the path of light, affect its frequency and energy, create black holes where light cannot escape, and produce gravitational waves that travel at the speed of light. These phenomena highlight the deep connection between gravity and light as described by Einstein's theory of general relativity. RAINBOW GRAVITY THEORY Rainbow gravity theory is a speculative and alternative theory of gravity that proposes modifications to Einstein's general theory of relativity. It suggests that the effects of gravity on space-time may depend on the energy of particles or photons traveling through it, leading to a modification of the usual gravitational equations. The term "rainbow" in rainbow gravity theory refers to the concept that different particles with varying energies experience different gravitational effects, much like how different colors of light refract at different angles to form a rainbow. The theory was first proposed by theoretical physicist Giovanni Amelino-Camelia in 2013 as a possible approach to address certain issues in the framework of quantum gravity. Rainbow gravity theory incorporates elements from both quantum mechanics and general relativity, aiming to provide a more comprehensive understanding of gravity at both small and large scales.
  • 11. KEY IDEAS IN RAINBOW GRAVITY THEORY The energy-dependent modification of space-time curvature could potentially resolve some of the challenges faced by other theories, such as the incompatibility between quantum mechanics and general relativity at very high energy scales or the singularity problem at the center of black holes. However, it is important to note that rainbow gravity theory is still a highly speculative concept, and it has not yet gained widespread acceptance or experimental confirmation. It remains an area of active research and theoretical exploration within the field of quantum gravity and the quest for a unified theory of physics. Further research and experimental evidence will be needed to determine the validity and implications of rainbow gravity theory and its compatibility with existing observations and fundamental principles of physics. GRAVITY BETWEEN SPHERICAL BODIES Newton's law of gravitation describes the gravitational force between any two point masses. However, for extended spherical objects like the Earth, the Moon, and other planets, the law holds with an assumption that masses of spherical objects are concentrated at their respective centers. This assumption can be proved easily by showing that the expression for gravitational potential energy between a hollow sphere of mass (M) and a point mass (m) is the same as it would be for a pair of extended spherical solid objects.
  • 12. Consider a tiny ring of width Rdϕ and mass dM on the surface of a spherical hollow sphere at a distance s from the point mass as shown in Figure 1(a). The gravitational potential energy between the ring and the point mass (m) is expressed as: The ratio of the ring's mass to the entire shell's mass is equal to the ratio of the ring's area to the shell's area. Therefore, on simplification, the ring's mass can be expressed as: Now, the square of distance (s) can be expressed as the sum of squares of the triangle's other two sides, as seen in Figure 1(b). Simplifying further and taking differentials on either side, Considering the entire shell, s can vary between r − R and r + R, as seen in Figure 1(c). Therefore, substituting dM and s in the potential energy equation and integrating within the limits of r − R to r + R, the relation obtained is the potential energy between point masses m and M at a distance r. Therefore, the assumption is proven. Since force is a derivative of potential energy, the assumption holds for gravitational forces between two spherically solid objects like the Earth and the Moon. Therefore, Newton's law of gravitation can be used to determine the gravitational force between the Earth and the Moon, and the Earth and the Sun.
  • 13. QUANTUM GRAVITY (QG): Quantum gravity (QG) is a field of theoretical physics that seeks to describe gravity according to the principles of quantum mechanics. It deals with environments in which neither gravitational nor quantum effects can be ignored such as in the vicinity of black holes, such as neutron stars. Quantum mechanics describes the behavior of matter and energy on very small scales, such as atoms and subatomic particles, while general relativity describes the force of gravity and the behavior of matter and energy on large scales, such as stars, galaxies, and the universe as a whole. RELATION OF CLASSICAL PHYSICS: In classical physics, gravity is described as a continuous force that can be described by Einstein's field equations in general relativity. However, when attempting to incorporate the principles of quantum mechanics, several challenges arise. One of the main issues is that the equations of general relativity do not account for the behavior of gravity at extremely small distances or at the singularities that arise in black holes. Quantum gravity seeks to develop a theory that encompasses both quantum mechanics and general relativity, providing a consistent description of the gravitational force at all scales. It aims to explain how gravity arises from the quantum behavior of fundamental particles and fields, and how the curvature of space-time, described by general relativity, can be understood in a quantum framework. SPACE-TIME BACKGROUND DEPENDENCE: Background independence is considered desirable because it allows for a more fundamental and unified treatment of gravity and other interactions. It enables a description of the gravitational field itself as a quantum entity and allows for a consistent quantum description of the early universe and black hole singularities, where the classical notion of spacetime breaks down.
  • 14. Developing a background-independent theory of quantum gravity is an active area of research, and various approaches and formalisms are being explored to overcome the challenges posed by background dependence and achieve a deeper understanding of the fundamental nature of space time and gravity. PROBLEM OF TIME: A conceptual difficulty in combining quantum mechanics with general relativity arises from the contrasting role of time within these two frameworks. In quantum theories time acts as an independent background through which states evolve, with the Hamiltonian operator acting as the generator of infinitesimal translations of quantum states through time. In contrast, general relativity treats time as a dynamical variable which relates directly with matter and moreover requires the Hamiltonian constraint to vanish. Because this variability of time has been observed macroscopically, it removes any possibility of employing a fixed notion of time, similar to the conception of time in quantum theory, at the macroscopic level. LOOP QUANTUM GRAVITY: Loop quantum gravity (LQG) is a theoretical framework and approach to quantum gravity that aims to quantize the geometry of space time. In loop quantum gravity, space time is discretized into a network of elementary units called loops or spin networks. These loops are based on the mathematical framework of spin networks from the theory of quantum mechanics. The theory incorporates principles from both general relativity and quantum mechanics to describe the quantum behavior of these loops. WHEELER-DEWITT EQUATION: The dynamics of loop quantum gravity are described by the Hamiltonian constraint equation, known as the Wheeler-DeWitt equation in the canonical quantization of general relativity. However, in loop quantum gravity, the Wheeler-DeWitt equation is modified and reformulated to incorporate the discrete nature of space time.
  • 15. The Wheeler-DeWitt equation can be written as: Here, Ĥ is the Wheeler-DeWitt operator, which represents the Hamiltonian constraint. It is an operator that acts on a wave function of the universe, denoted by Ψ. The wave function Ψ describes the quantum state of the entire universe or the space-time geometry itself. The Wheeler-DeWitt equation essentially states that the total wave function of the universe must satisfy this constraint equation. It implies that the Hamiltonian of the system, which generates time evolution in classical physics, vanishes when acting on the wave function. STRING THEORY: String theory is a theoretical framework that combines quantum mechanics and general relativity to describe the fundamental building blocks of the universe as tiny, vibrating strings instead of point-like particles KEY FEATURES OF STRING THEORY: 1. Extended Objects: In contrast to point particles, which have no internal structure, string theory introduces one-dimensional strings. These strings can vibrate and undergo different modes of oscillation, giving rise to different particle properties such as mass, charge, and spin. The vibrational patterns of the strings determine the various types of particles observed in nature. 2. Extra Dimensions: String theory also requires the existence of additional spatial dimensions beyond the familiar three dimensions of space (length, width, and height) and the dimension of time. These extra dimensions are typically curled up" at very
  • 16. small scales, making them effectively unobservable at everyday energy scales. The inclusion of extra dimensions helps resolve certain mathematical and conceptual issues that arise in attempts to unify gravity with the other fundamental forces. 3. Consistency and Symmetry: String theory incorporates principles of quantum mechanics, such as wave-particle duality and uncertainty, as well as the principles of general relativity. It maintains consistency through a set of mathematical rules governing the interactions and behavior of the strings. Symmetry plays a crucial role in string theory, with various symmetries offering insights into the relationships between different particles and forces. 4. String Theory Landscape: String theory predicts a vast landscape of possible solutions or "vacua," each corresponding to a different set of physical properties, including particle masses and coupling constants. This concept of a landscape provides a potential explanation for the diverse phenomena observed in our universe. It is important to note that string theory is still an area of active research, and many aspects of the theory are yet to be fully understood. The theory exists in various formulations and versions, including Type I, Type IIA, Type IIB, heterotic, and M-theory, which are different limits or dual descriptions of a more fundamental theory. CONCEPTS IN STRING THEORY: 1. Nambu-Goto Action: The Nambu-Goto action describes the dynamics of a string in terms of its worldsheet, a two-dimensional surface swept out by the string as it moves through spacetime. The action is proportional to the area of the worldsheet and is given by: S = -T∫d²σ √(-h) Here, T is the string tension, d²σ represents the worldsheet area element, and h is the determinant of the worldsheet metric. 2. String Mode Expansion: The equations of motion in string theory involve the expansion of the string coordinates and fields into different modes of vibration. These
  • 17. modes represent the various vibrational states of the string, corresponding to different particles and interactions. The specific equations for the mode expansion depend on the type of string theory being considered (e.g., open strings or closed strings) and the specific background conditions. It's important to note that the full equations of string theory are highly complex and involve sophisticated mathematical techniques, such as conformal field theory, super symmetry, and extra dimensions. The equations mentioned above provide a glimpse into the mathematical framework of string theory, but a complete and unified formulation of the theory is still an active area of research.