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Perseus
In Greek
Mythology
Symbol: Medusa's head
Consort: Andromeda
Parents: Zeus and Danaë
Children: Perses, Heleus,
Alcaeus, Sthenelus,
Electryon, ...
There once was a king
named Acrisius, who
had a beautiful
daughter
named Danae. The
Oracle
of Apollo told Acrisius t
hat t...
The tower had no
doors, except for one
very small
window. Danae was
very sad, until one
day, a bright golden
light came th...
When king Acrisius heard
the baby , he cast his
daughter and grandson into
a wooden chest and set
them into the wild sea t...
Perseus grew up into a
fine young man under the
care of the kind fisherman
Dictys. In the meanwhile,
King Polydectes began...
He challenged Perseus to
dare a difficult task, to
kill the fearsome Gorgon
Medusa and bring back
her head. Gorgon
Medousa...
The Gorgons were
three monsters in Greek
mythology, daughters of
Echidna and Typhon, the
mother and father of
all monsters...
In his despair, a tall woman
and a young man with winged
sandals appeared and
introduced themselves as
goddess Athena and
...
When he cut Medusa’s
head off, from the drops
of her blood suddenly
appeared two offspring:
Pegasus, a winged
horse, and C...
Perseus,
Andromeda
and
Cetus
In Ethiopia
Andromeda
The desperate king
consulted the Oracle of
Apollo, who announced
that no respite would
be found until the king
s...
Perseus was returning
from having slain
the Gorgon Medusa.
After he happened
upon the chained
Andromeda, he
approached Cet...
Perseus and Andromeda had
seven sons: Perses, Alcaeus,
Heleus, Mestor, Sthenelus,
Electryon, and Cynurus as
well as two da...
In some accounts,
the Greeks
imagined that
when Perseus,
Andromeda and
Cassiopeia died
their images
were put into the
nigh...
Perseus, Medusa, Andromeda and Cetus
Perseus, Medusa, Andromeda and Cetus
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Perseus, Medusa, Andromeda and Cetus

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Greek mythology

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Perseus, Medusa, Andromeda and Cetus

  1. 1. Perseus
  2. 2. In Greek Mythology
  3. 3. Symbol: Medusa's head Consort: Andromeda Parents: Zeus and Danaë Children: Perses, Heleus, Alcaeus, Sthenelus, Electryon, Mestor, Cynurus, Gorgophone, Autochthe Siblings: Ares, Athena, Apollo, Artemis, Aphrodite, Dionysus, Hebe, Hermes, Heracles, Helen of Troy, Hephaestus, Minos, The Muses, The Graces
  4. 4. There once was a king named Acrisius, who had a beautiful daughter named Danae. The Oracle of Apollo told Acrisius t hat there would come a day when Danae's son would kill him; so he locked Danae in a bronze tower so that she would never marry or have children. Acrisius Danae Delphi, the oracle
  5. 5. The tower had no doors, except for one very small window. Danae was very sad, until one day, a bright golden light came through the small window; a man appeared holding a thunderbolt in his hand and although Danae knew he was a god, she didn't know which one.
  6. 6. When king Acrisius heard the baby , he cast his daughter and grandson into a wooden chest and set them into the wild sea to get drowned. However, Zeus saw Danae and asked Poseidon to calm the sea water. Indeed, the sea calmed down and after a few days, Danae and son landed on the island of Serifos. There Dictys, a fisherman and brother of the island's king, found them and took them to his home, where they would be safe.
  7. 7. Perseus grew up into a fine young man under the care of the kind fisherman Dictys. In the meanwhile, King Polydectes began to be inflamed by passion for Danae, who was still a charming lady. Danae, however, did not wish this marriage. Polydectes thought that the presence of Perseus was an obstacle for Danae and that is why she didn’t wish to get married. He set up a plan to get rid of the man. King Polydectes
  8. 8. He challenged Perseus to dare a difficult task, to kill the fearsome Gorgon Medusa and bring back her head. Gorgon Medousa was a terrible monster with snakes in her head and she could turn into stone everyone that looked her face. By killing Medousa, Perseus would prove his braveness, as fits to the son of Zeus.
  9. 9. The Gorgons were three monsters in Greek mythology, daughters of Echidna and Typhon, the mother and father of all monsters respectively. Their names were Stheno, Euryale, and the most famous of them, Medusa. Although the first two were immortal, Medusa was not.
  10. 10. In his despair, a tall woman and a young man with winged sandals appeared and introduced themselves as goddess Athena and god Hermes. Hermes said that they were all siblings as Perseus was in fact the son of Zeus, so they would help him in his quest; so Hermes offered him his winged sandals and the sickle that was used by Cronus to castrate Uranus; while Athena gave him her shield, so that Perseus would not have to look straight into Medusa's eyes.
  11. 11. When he cut Medusa’s head off, from the drops of her blood suddenly appeared two offspring: Pegasus, a winged horse, and Chrysaor, a giant or a winged boar. It’s believed that those two were Medusa’s children with Poseidon.
  12. 12. Perseus, Andromeda and Cetus
  13. 13. In Ethiopia
  14. 14. Andromeda The desperate king consulted the Oracle of Apollo, who announced that no respite would be found until the king sacrificed his daughter, Andromeda, to the monster. Stripped naked, she was chained to a rock on the coast. Andromeda
  15. 15. Perseus was returning from having slain the Gorgon Medusa. After he happened upon the chained Andromeda, he approached Cetus while invisible (for he was wearing Hades's helm), and killed the sea monster.
  16. 16. Perseus and Andromeda had seven sons: Perses, Alcaeus, Heleus, Mestor, Sthenelus, Electryon, and Cynurus as well as two daughters, Autochthe and Gorgophone. Their descendants ruled Mycenae from Electryon down to Eurystheus, after whom Atreus attained the kingdom, and would also include the great hero Heracles. According to this mythology, Perseus is the ancestor of the Persians.
  17. 17. In some accounts, the Greeks imagined that when Perseus, Andromeda and Cassiopeia died their images were put into the night sky as constellations or groups of stars.

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