Branding 102

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Seminar at Carnegie Mellon Masters of Entertainment Industry Management Program 11/8/13

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Branding 102

  1. 1. WHAT  IS  A  BRAND?  
  2. 2. IT’S  A  CONCEPT  THAT  GOES  ALL  THE  WAY   BACK  TO  2000  BCE    
  3. 3. AND  TO  OUR  OWN  ANCIENT  HISTORY  
  4. 4. WHAT  IT’S  NOT     IS  A     LOGO!  
  5. 5. Ceci n’est pas une brand. (This  is  not  a  brand)
  6. 6. THESE  ARE  NOT  BRANDS  EITHER  
  7. 7. A  LOGO  IS  A  “SIGN”   WHICH  MEANS  THAT  IT     STANDS     FOR  SOMETHING  
  8. 8. A  LOGO  OR  LOGOTYPE     IS  “DESIGN  SPEAK”  FOR  A  TRADEMARK  MADE   FROM  A  CUSTOM-­‐LETTERED  WORD   AND  CAN  BE  A  SYMBOL,   MONOGRAM,   EMBLEM   OR     OTHER  GRAPHIC  DEVICE    
  9. 9. A  BRAND  USED  TO  BE     AN  ASSET     OWNED  BY  A  COMPANY      
  10. 10. TODAY,  IT’S  AN  EMOTIONAL     IMPRESSION   OR     IDEA   THAT  SURROUNDS  A     UNIQUE  IDENTITY     FROM     SOAP  TO  CELEBRITY  
  11. 11. A  BRAND  IS  NOT  A  PRODUCT  
  12. 12. IT’S  A  PERSON’S  GUT  FEELING  ABOUT  A   PRODUCT,  SERVICE  OR  COMPANY  
  13. 13. A  BRAND  IS  A  KIND  OF  PLATONIC  IDEAL—A  CONCEPT  SHARED  BY   SOCIETY  TO  IDENTIFY  A  SPECIFIC  CLASS  OF  THINGS  
  14. 14. THE  WORD  “BRAND”  ORIGINALLY  COMES     FROM  THE  MIDDLE  ENGLISH  TERM     MEANING     “TORCH”  
  15. 15. BRAND  DEFINED?   LIKE  ITS  NAMESAKE,     A  BRAND  CAN  EITHER     LIGHT     THE  WAY     FOR  CUSTOMERS  TO  SOLVE  A  PROBLEM  OR   SHINE     A  HIGHLIGHT  ON  VALUE  
  16. 16. OR     …it  can  be  exSnguished  by  a  lack  of  oxygen    
  17. 17. BRAND  HAS  BEEN  DEFINED  IN  MANY  WAYS   As  a  promise  that  consumers  believe  in   An  image  in  the  consumer’s  mind   An  essence  that  has  social  &  cultural  relevance   An  iden7ty  that  can  evoke  an  emoSonal   response   •  A  defini7on  of  what  a  product  stands  for   •  A  sign  or  “mark”  that  has  meaning   •  A  design  that  encourages  trust   •  •  •  • 
  18. 18.   IN  THIS  “AGE  OF  PERSUASION’  A  BRAND  IS   COMPLEX  AND  CAN  BE:   AN  IMAGE   A  BADGE   OR   A  WORD  IN  THE  MIND      
  19. 19. THE  EVOLUTION  OF  CURRENCY   MIRRORS   è   è   THE  EVOLUTION  OF     TRUST   è  
  20. 20. ...AND  TRUST  IS  THE  BEDROCK  OF  MODERN   BRANDING  
  21. 21. A  BRAND  HAS   EQUITY  
  22. 22. It  can  be  safely  said  that  Coca-­‐Cola’s  total  market   value  is  more  an  emo$onal  quanSty,  than  a   physical  one.       Hard  assets  like  bocling  plants,  trucks,  raw   materials,  and  buildings  are  not  as  important  to   Coke—or  Wall  Street,  for  that  macer—as  the   consumer  goodwill  that  exists  around  the  world   toward  the  brand.                    Bedbury  2002  
  23. 23. Coke’s  Market  Cap  including   brand  value:  $120  Billion   Without  the  brand,  Coke’s  Glass   Would  be  Half  Empty   Coke’s  Market  Cap  Not  including   Brand  Value:  $50  Billion  
  24. 24. BRAND  DIFFERENTIATION   How  is  it   accomplished?                      
  25. 25.  By  acaching  a  powerful  IDEA  to  a   brand  
  26. 26. THE  BRAND  STORY     The  brand  narra;ve     should  serve  to     personalize  it.    
  27. 27. My  image  is  a  statement  of  the  symbols  of  the   harsh,  impersonal  products  and  brash   materialisSc  objects  on  which  America  is  built   today.  It  is  a  projecSon  of  everything  that  can  be   bought  and  sold,  the  pracScal  impermanent   symbols  that  sustain  us.                      Andy  Warhol  
  28. 28. ADVERTISING  DEFINED  From  the  La;n,     “To  Turn  Toward”    
  29. 29.    ……is     •   ONE  SUBSET  OF  MARKETING   •   THE  ACT  OF  BRINGING  A  PRODUCT  OR                    SERVICE  TO  THE  PUBLIC’S  ATTENTION   •  AND  OFTEN  USING  PAID  ANNOUNCEMENTS   OR              COMMERCIALS    
  30. 30. We  receive  a  bombardment  of   3000-­‐5000  media  messages  daily  
  31. 31. MARKETING  DEFINED   From  the  La;n,  “TO  BUY”,     markeSng  refers  to  all  or  part  of  the  PROCESS   of:   èCONCEIVING  èPROMOTING   èDISTRIBUTING   èSELLING  A  PRODUCT                        OR  SERVICE  
  32. 32. THE  TRANSFORMED  MEDIA  AND     MARKETING  LANDSCAPE  
  33. 33. THE  4  KEY  TRANSFORMERS  
  34. 34. »   INTERACTIVITY   »     PERSONALIZATION   »     IMMEDIACY   »     COMMUNITY  
  35. 35. INTERACTIVITY   •  Audience  members,  consumers,  clients,   prospecSve  customers  are  all  now  called   “users”     •  The  expected  experience  is  no  longer  the   lean-­‐back  one  of  the  television  living  room,   but  lean-­‐forward  of  PC,  tablet  &  mobile   •  Users  expect  to  have  a  say  &  the  ability  to   interact  with  &  manipulate  her  or  his  personal   media  environment  
  36. 36. PERSONALIZATION   •  From  MySpace  to  iPhone  to  Facebook  &  LinkedIn   Profiles,  digital  media  is  now  super-­‐charged  with   the  capability  of  incorporaSng  the  INDIVIDUAL  &   the  PERSONAL     •  From  branding  &  iconography  to  collaboraSve   filtering,  CHOICE  &  having  OPTIONS  are  the  way   of  the  digital  world     •  This  feature  has  brought  the  issue  of  personal   PRIVACY  to  the  forefront  of  public  &  media  policy    
  37. 37. IMMEDIACY   •  The  web  offers  INSTANT  GRATIFICATION  that  can  be   addicSve  from  enhanced,  INSTANTANEOUS  shopping   experiences  like  Amazon’s  “one-­‐click”  buy  bucon  to   streaming  media  of  sites  like  Nemlix.com  and  Hulu.com     •  YouTube  streaming  now  accounts  for  one  fourth  of  the   Web’s  daily  traffic  has  made  NET  NEUTRALITY  another   major  issue  confronSng  law  makers  and  media  giants   •  Twicer  is  now  a  major  source  of  breaking  news  with   2500  TWEETS  PER  SECOND  ½  BILLION  TWEETS  A  DAY   •  GPS  and  GEOLOCATION  services  have  transformed  the   mobile  phone  into  a  community  device  &  data   goldmine  
  38. 38. COMMUNITY   •  The  SPECIALIZATION  of  human  experience  is  now   capable  of  being  web  channeled  into  affiniSes  of   every  special  interest  imaginable   •  Through  the  power  of  NETWORKING,  like-­‐minded   individuals  can  find  each  other  by  just  a  click-­‐ through  in  a  search  window,  a  “friend”  or  a   “follow”   •  These  COMMUNITIES  also  relate  to  business   interests  &  can  be  linked  together  via  corporate   or  brand  “networks”  &  can  be  leveraged  for   ongoing  distribuSon  of  content,  offers,  press   releases,  etc.    
  39. 39. TWO  KEY  MEDIA  TRENDS   ✔ THE  SHIFT  IN  MEDIA  DISTRIBUTION     ✔ THE  COMING  GENERATIONAL  SHIFT  
  40. 40. THE  DISTRIBUTION  SHIFT   •  Peer-­‐to-­‐peer  &  social  network  sharing  to  crowd   sourcing  &  user  generated  content,  distribuSon  once   in  the  hands  of  media  companies  is  now  run  by  “user   distributors”   •   The  trend  is  toward  distributed  authority  of  the  flat   organizaSonal  model  where  decision-­‐making  authority   is  at  the  edge  &  an  example  of  corporate  reacSon  to   this  new  empowerment  of  the  individual   •  Even  savvy  companies  like  Amazon,  Pizza  Hut,  BP  have   been  caught  up  in  the  grassfire  of  negaSve  blogging   campaigns  &  have  evolved  the  corporate  blog  as  pre-­‐ emp;ve  brand  strategy    
  41. 41. GENERATIONAL  SHIFT   •  ConvenSonal  wisdom  says  the  dominant  forces   that  will  transform  media  &  markeSng  will  come   from  the  introducSon  of  new  technologies  &   changes  in  the  means  of  distribu;on   •  The  most  powerful  transformaSve  agent  of   change  will  be  a  coming  genera;onal  shiQ     •  Now  evident  in  the  advent  of  mulS-­‐tasking,  social   media  &  mobile  adopSon,  the  dominance  of   short-­‐form  video  formats  
  42. 42. What  is  social?  
  43. 43. IF  YOU  GOOGLE  “SOCIAL”     2  BILLION  RESULTS  
  44. 44. WHAT  IS  “SOCIALE”?       Borrowed  from  the  LaSn  via  Middle  French       and  routed  in  the  Mother  Tongue  it  originally     meant  “united  or  living  with  others”     or  “companion”  
  45. 45. “TO  FOLLOW”…   The  LaSn  root  of  social  is  sequi  which  means  “to   follow.”     So,  here  in  a  nutshell  is  where  the  Twicer  transiSve   verb,  “to  follow”,  finds  its  first  use.   If  we  search  sSll  further,  we  come  upon  its  link  to   the  Old  Icelandic  seggr  meaning  “companion  or   man”…     and  ulSmately  to  the  mother  tongue  load  in   Sanskrit  where,  as  sakha,  it  simply  means  “friend”  
  46. 46. IN  THE  FUTURE  WE  WILL  ALL  HAVE     15+  “FRIENDS”   Andy  Warhol  did  not  say  that.   But  here,  we  arrive  at  root  origin  of  the   Facebook  transiSve  verb,  “to  friend”,  closing  the   loop  of  a  word  that  we  use  everyday  to  describe   the  expanding  communicaSon  ripples  that  bind,   link,  and  otherwise  connect  us  with  a  click…  
  47. 47. MARKETING  BACKGROUND  
  48. 48. CONSUMER  DRIVEN  MARKETING   Content  is  sSll  king  and  the  driving  force  behind   markeSng  tools.     But,  today’s  dominant  model  adds  consumer  power  to   tradiSonal  markeSng  creaSng:     Ø   LOWER  COST  FOR  OUTREACH   Ø   MORE  AUTHENTICITY   Ø   MORE  EFFICIENCIES   Ø   ONGOING  CUSTOMER  RELATIONSHIP                  VS.  BRAND  “PUSH”     Or  as  David  Ogilvy  once  said:     “The  consumer  isn’t  a  moron.  She  is  your  wife.”  
  49. 49. DIGITAL  MARKETING  BENEFITS   •  Digital  Channels  generate  Informa$on  that  can   be  used  for  more  dynamic  brand  management   •  Digital  Immediacy  enables  companies  to  be  more   responsive  to  consumers  &  the  marketplace   •  Viral  aspect  of  New  Media  allows  reaching   audiences  faster  &  more  efficiently   •  Virality  means  digital  reach  not  necessarily   correlated  with  ad  spend  
  50. 50. OTHER  DIGITAL  MARKETING   BENEFITS   •  Compelling  Content  allows  marketers  to  Interact   with  far  more  customers  than  can  be  afforded  by   tradiSonal  media     •  Digital  Channels  allow  Direct  Dialogue  &   conversaSon  with  Customers   •  Yields  more  &  becer  tuned  Informa$on  about   consumers  needs  and  preferences     •  Customer  Engagement  is  more  powerful  when   they  are  parScipants  with  the  brand     •  Analy$cs  &  Op$miza$on  reduce  latency,   inefficiencies  in  markeSng  programs  
  51. 51. WORD  OF  MOUTH  MARKETING   WOM  used  to  be  “person-­‐to-­‐person”.     Now,  it’s  community-­‐driven  and  requires  markeSng  tacScs   that:     •  Make  friends  among  the  talkers   •  Finds  out  what  they’re  talking  about   •  Gives  them  topics  to  talk  more  about   •  USlize  the  best  tools  to  convey  the  message     •  Listen  to,  then  allow  the  brand  to  join  in  the  conversaSon   •  Track  what  customers  are  saying  about  the  company     •  Are  responsive  &  provide  constant,  expanding  value   •  Are  REAL  
  52. 52. TRADITIONAL  PURCHASE  STAGES   • TV,  RADIO   • OUT-­‐OF-­‐DOOR   • DIRECT  MAIL   • BROCHURE   • PRODUCT  TEST   • COMPARISON   • IN-­‐STORE  PURCHASE   • REWARD  POINTS    
  53. 53. NETWORKED  PURCHASE  STAGES   • SEARCH     • PRODUCT  BUZZ     • BLOGS   • ONLINE  RESEARCH     • PEER  REVIEWS   • YOUTUBE  VIDEO   • MASHUPS    
  54. 54. THE  NEW  PURCHASE  FUNNEL   • ADVOCACY   • LOYALTY   • ACTION   • PREFERENCE   • CONSIDERATION   • AWARENESS   • VALUE    
  55. 55. THE  BRAND  PLATFORM   •  Chief  strategic  objecSve  is  to  build  an  integrated  brand  plamorm   that  combines  tradi;onal  PR  and  outreach  with  best  of  breed   digital  markeSng  tacScs.     •  The  plamorm  integrates  key  corporate  funcSons  and  processes   using  technology  to  idenSfy  and  aggregate  in  one  place  all   interacSons  with  customers,  prospects,  and  media  outlets.     •  The  goal  of  the  plamorm  is  to  find  out  who  is  talking  about  the   company  or  topics  close  to  it,  and  get  informaSon  to  people  in  the   company  to  take  appropriate  acSon.   •  The  addiSon  of  a  social  media  plamorm  as  part  of  the  overall  brand   plamorm  is  a  relaSvely  recent  addiSon  to  corporate  technology   infrastructure.      
  56. 56. TWITTER  VISUALIZED  
  57. 57. THE  BIRDS  AND  THE  BEES  DO  IT  
  58. 58. IDENTIFY  OPTIMAL  CHANNELS  
  59. 59. BUILDING  THE  “NETWORK”     ObjecSve  is  to  develop  cross  plamorm  communicaSons  and   markeSng  “pipeline”  that  can  be  uSlized  on  an  ongoing  basis   (as  opposed  to  tradiSonal  ad  hoc/event-­‐oriented  PR   approach):     •  IDENTIFY  INDUSTRY/TRADE  INFLUENCERS  (uSlizing  Visible   Technologies,  Radian6,  Buzzlogic  type  applicaSons)   •  IDENTIFY  KEY  AFFINITY  GROUPS   •  CONNECT  THROUGH  SOCIAL  MEDIA  CHANNELS   •  CONTRIBUTE  COMMENTARY  TO  CONVERSATION   •  CONTRIBUTE  VALUABLE  CONTENT   •  INTEGRATE  DIGITAL  MEDIA  WITH  REAL  WORLD  EVENTS,   PR,  MARKETING  EFFORTS  
  60. 60. VIDEO  SEEDING  
  61. 61. BRAND  REPUTATION  MANAGEMENT   Monitor  search  engines  and  social  media  for   negaSve  brand  menSons  and  respond:   PROACTIVE  GOALS:     •  CreaSve  posiSve  content  in  search  engines,  social   media  &  related  channels  to  keep  posiSve  brand   content  creaSon  as  an  ongoing  effort   REACTIVE  GOALS:     •  Monitor  for  negaSve  menSons   •  IdenSfy  &  report  negaSve  content  &  Creators   •  Respond,  comment/counter  comment  
  62. 62. “THE  FUTURE  IS  THE  FUTURE  IS  THE  PRESENT.”      MARSHALL  MCLUHAN  
  63. 63. WHAT  GETS  MEASURED,  GETS  DONE.                    Old  Business  Saying  
  64. 64. Just  because  you  can  measure  it  doesn’t  mean  it   macers.                  Oliver  Blanchard                  Measuring  Social  ROI  
  65. 65. MEASUREMENT   What  are  criScal  deliverables?     Key  Performance  Indicators:     •  Growth  Rate  of  New  Customers   •  Growth  Rate  by  Month   •  Growth  of  InsStuSonal  Investment   •  Seasonal  Growth   •  Effect  of  Media  Choices  on  Monthly  Growth  Rate   •  Impact  of  Messaging     •  Impact  of  Original  Content  on  Growth  
  66. 66. “LINCOLN” CAMPAIGN GROWTH" 30000$ 12$ Not$Ranked$ 25000$ 10$ 9$ 20000$ 8$ 15000$ 6$ 5$ 5$ 5$ 5$ 4$ 10000$ 4$ 3$ 5000$ 3$ 2$ 2$ 3$ 2$ $Pages$Indexed$(Cum)$ $Messages$Sent$(Cum)$ 1$ 1$ $iTunes$Rank$ 0$ 10 4A pr $ 12 4A pr $ 14 4A pr $ 16 4A pr $ 18 4A pr $ 20 4A pr $ 22 4A pr $ 64 Ap r$ 84 Ap r$ 24 Ap r$ 44 Ap r$ ar $ ar $ 31 4M ar $ 29 4M 27 4M 25 4M ar $ 0$ iTunes ranking compared to broadcast spots and pages indexed!
  67. 67. ANALYTICS            Key  analyScs:   • Data  Captured   • Email  Addresses   • Mobile  Phone  #’s     • Snailmail  Addresses   • Sales  Leads   • Brand  Awareness  
  68. 68. THERE  ARE  1349  CAMERAS  ON  THE  MARKET.       HOW  DO  YOU  DECIDE  WHICH  ONE  TO  BUY?  
  69. 69. FREUD  ON  MAD  AVE  
  70. 70. SAY  “HELLO”  TO   NEUROMARKETING  
  71. 71. THE  FUTURE  IN  SHORT  IS  fMRI  
  72. 72. YOU  ARE  THE  DATA  
  73. 73. HAVE  A  NICE  DAY!  
  74. 74. Acknowledgements     Marty  Neumeier   Marshall  McLuhan   Patrick  Renvoise  &  Christophe  Morin   Paddy  Spinks  &  Nick  Turner   Elizabeth  Gebhardt   Relishmix.com   Buzcast.com   Mediablitzz   Keith  Boesky        

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