Aravind SrivatsanA PradeepAbhishek JainTransfer PricingInstitute of Cost & Works Accountants of India30 April 2009B S R & ...
2Key Takeaways & Unanswered issuesOverview of Transfer Pricing in IndiaEmerging TrendsWhat we would discuss today…Transfer...
3Introduction to Transfer PricingB S R & Co.
4• Transfer pricing refers to the pricing of cross-border transactions between two related entities• When two related enti...
5Legislation introduced with effect from April 1, 2001.Generally in line with the OECD guidelinesCompliance RequirementsSt...
6Overview of Transfer Pricing in IndiaEnd of Part I
7Overview of Transfer Pricing in India
8Applicability of Transfer Pricing Regulations• Any income arising from an international transaction shall be computed hav...
9ACBBoth A and B areassociatedenterprises of CD and E are also associatedenterprises of C since they havea common ultimate...
10DeemedAssociatedEnterprisesCommonexecutivedirector(s)Loans inexcess of51% of totalassetsGuaranteesin excess of10% of tot...
11•Transactions between two or more associated enterprises•Either or both of whom are non-residentsTransaction relates to:...
12Third parties transactions deemed to be international transaction -Sec 92B(2)Sec 92B(2)A’s Parent 3rd partyAPrior agreem...
13Arm’s Length Price (ALP)•Price applied or proposed to be applied in a transaction between personsother than associated e...
14• Most appropriate method shall be the method best suited to the facts andcircumstances of each particular international...
15• Most Direct Method for testing ALP and thePrices are Benchmarked• Requires strict comparability in products,contractua...
16• Compares the resale gross margin earned byassociated enterprise with the resale grossmargin earned by comparable indep...
17• Compares the mark up earned on direct andindirect costs incurred with that ofcomparable independent companies• Preferr...
18• To be applied in cases involving transfer of unique intangibles or in multipleinternational transactions that cannot b...
19• Examines net operating profit from transactions as a percentage of a certainbase (can use different bases i.e. costs, ...
20• Grouping of transaction - Relevant controlled transactions require to be aggregatedto test whether the controlled tran...
21Summary of MethodsNet ProfitMarginsProfit MarginsGPM (on costs)benchmarkedGPM (on sales)benchmarkedPrices arebenchmarked...
22•An Indian company (‘IndCo’), mainlyengaged in the refining and sale of coppermetal•IndCo purchases crude metal from bot...
23FOB basisCIF basisFOB basisOther TermsINR 28,500(applicable forentire year)INR 32,000(applicablefor entireyear)INR 29,50...
24UnrelatedSupplier A(Japan)RelatedSupplierForCo (AUS)IndCo (India)• The controlled and uncontrolled arrangementsare compa...
25RelatedSupplierForCo (AUS)IndCo (India)• The controlled and uncontrolled arrangementshave following differencesDifferenc...
26• Best Method: given the availability of required data, CUP is the most appropriatemethod• Rejection of CUP related to S...
27• Indian Auto ManufacturerFull fledged manufacturerR&D and IP with overseas parent• Limited international transaction - ...
28• Most Appropriate Method: given the availability of required data, the TNMM isthe best method• While applying the TNMM ...
29Case Study II - Application of the TNMMIndustry Analysis
30• Indian entity being the simpler entity is the tested party• Net Profit Margin (Net operating profits/sales) seems to b...
31Documentation Requirement & Form 3CEBB S R & Co.
32Documentation Requirements• Profile of industry• Profile of group• Profile of Indian entity• Profile of associatedenterp...
334152 3Transfer Pricing ProcessGatheringBackgroundInformationFinancialAnalysisAccountant’sReport6FunctionalAnalysisEconom...
34• Preparationof projectplan • Search strategy• Access to local& globaldatabase• Analysis ofinternalcomparables• Judiciou...
35Accountant’s report• Obtained by every person entering intoan international transaction• To be filed by the due date for...
36Stringent PenaltiesRs 100,000Failure to furnish accountant’sreport2% of the value of theinternationaltransactionFailure ...
37Transfer Pricing Audit Process & ExperienceB S R & Co.
38Transfer Pricing Audit ProcessFile tax return & Accountant’s Report (30th September)Reference to be made to TP Officer (...
39TP AssessmentSome important statistics (ESTIMATED)AY 2002-03Cases assessed = 1081Cases adjusted = 239Total adjustment = ...
40• Steep expansion of administration [No. ofTransfer Pricing Officers (TPOs) from 18 to 80]• Coordinated All-India Transf...
41• Consistent losses / low margins of theassessee attributable to inter-companytransactions• Significant changes in profi...
42•Use of multiple year data•Arithmetical mean and + / - 5percent range•Use of adjustments – Idle capacity,risk adjustment...
43TP AssessmentKey Points for success in Transfer Pricing audits in India• Proactive TP analysis• Detailed FAR analysis– A...
44Overview of Transfer Pricing in IndiaEnd of Part II
45Industry Challenges &Synopsis on Recent Judicial RulingsB S R & Co.
46Transfer Pricing Challenges – Manufacturing• Type of manufacturing (tollmanufacturer, contract manufacturer,licensed man...
47Transfer Pricing Challenges – Trading / Distribution• Most appropriate method - RPM Vs.TNMM• Use of GPM as a PLI - Absen...
48Transfer Pricing Challenges – IT / ITES• Captives are risk mitigated – Cannotincur operating losses• Value chain analysi...
49Skoda Auto India Private Limited
50Skoda Auto IndiaFacts of the Case• Incorporated on December 1999, started commercial production in November 2001;• FY 20...
51Skoda India’s objections• Comparables should be selected based on the functional comparability;• Skoda’s business model ...
52Department’s ArgumentsAO made assessment in conformity with the TPO’s order.CIT(A) dismissed all contentions of Skoda In...
53Tribunal’s ObservationsSkoda India’s contentions• Argued for usage of multiple year data (submitting data on the peculia...
54Tribunal’s Ruling• Internal CUP rejected as benchmark prices used are also controlled transactions.• Since the business ...
55UCB India Private Limited
56Facts of the CaseUCB S.A. BelgiumUCB IndiaIndiaOutside IndiaInternal CUPNot AvailableExternalCUPSaleofAPIAssessment 2002...
57Transfer Pricing Officer’s CUP workings2,09,75,500Total5,31,0005,31027,07532,385100 KgsMesna2,04,44,5001,319381*1,70015,...
58UCB’s ObjectionsSelection of TNMM• Robust FAR analysis done by UCB India &complied with all requirements as stipulated i...
59Department’s ArgumentsRejection of TNMM• UCB India failed to furnish documentation as required by Rule 10D. Hence, Onus ...
60Tribunal’s RulingRule 10D compliance• What needs to be seen is whether the assessee has substantially complied with the ...
61Philips Software Centre Private Limited
62Facts of the case• Business: Software development servicesto its associated enterprises.• Taxpayer enjoying Tax Holiday ...
63TP study carried out by the taxpayer cannot be disregarded unlessthere are serious deficiencies thereinFresh SearchTPO r...
64Sony India Private Limited
65Sony IndiaFacts of the case• Sony India was engaged in assembly and distribution of colour televisions and audioproducts...
66Sony IndiaAn entity can be taken as uncontrolled if its related party transaction donot exceed 10 to 15 percent of total...
67Mentor Graphics (Noida) Pvt. Ltd.
68Mentor GraphicsExport of marketingsupport servicesSoftware DevelopmentServicesInternationalTransactionTNMMTNMMMethod ofc...
69Mentor GraphicsArguments & Final VerdictTP Assessment and CIT(A)• TPO rejected comparables selected by MentorGraphics’ a...
70DocComplianceSelection ofMAMSkoda AutoHoneywellUCB IndiaPhilips SoftwareSony IndiaDevelop. Consult.Star IndiaAggregation...
71Adjustment Multipleyear dataRPTSkoda AutoHoneywellUCB IndiaSafeHarbourPhilips SoftwareSony IndiaDevelop. Consult.Star In...
72Unanswered IssuesKey Takeaways&B S R & Co.
73Key Takeaways from Recent Rulings• Transfer Pricing is not an exact science andinvolves a fair amount of objective reaso...
74Unanswered issues• Whether one should take cognizance of thegroup’s global profitability scenario?• Whether high margin ...
75Overview of Transfer Pricing in IndiaEnd of Part III
76© 2006 BSR & Co., a firm of Chartered Accountants, duly registered under the Indian Partnership Act, 1932. All rights re...
77Transfer Pricing in a Recessionary EconomyCarefully Document the “Functional & Risk Profile”• Specify up-front the funct...
78Draw Attention to Impact of Realized Risks• State the original intent of the parties with respect tofunctions and risks•...
79Don’t Try to Force Fit an Approach• Describe overall company performance and the factors driving the results (internal-o...
80• Detailed guidance on specific transfer pricing issues• Synchronization of transaction value with Customs Act• Guidance...
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Transfer pricing bsr_co

  1. 1. Aravind SrivatsanA PradeepAbhishek JainTransfer PricingInstitute of Cost & Works Accountants of India30 April 2009B S R & Co.
  2. 2. 2Key Takeaways & Unanswered issuesOverview of Transfer Pricing in IndiaEmerging TrendsWhat we would discuss today…Transfer Pricing in a Recessionary EconomyDocumentation Requirement & Form 3CEBIndustry Challenges & Recent Judicial RulingsIntroduction to Transfer PricingTransfer Pricing Process & Audit Procedure
  3. 3. 3Introduction to Transfer PricingB S R & Co.
  4. 4. 4• Transfer pricing refers to the pricing of cross-border transactions between two related entities• When two related entities enter into any cross-border transaction, the price at which theyundertake their transaction is called transfer price• Due to the special relationship between related companies, the transfer price may bedifferent than the price that would have been agreed between the unrelated companies• Price between unrelated parties in uncontrolled conditions is known as the “arm’s lengthprice”Introduction of Transfer Pricing RegulationsFinance Minister’s speech on the rational for introducing Transfer Pricing Regulations“The presence of multinational enterprises in India and their ability to allocate profits in differentjurisdictions by controlling prices in intra-group transactions has made the issue of transferpricing a matter of serious concern. I had set up an Expert Group in November 1999 toexamine the detailed structure for transfer pricing legislation. Necessary legislative changes arebeing made in the Finance Bill based on these recommendations.”- Mr Yashwant SinhaFinance Minister, Government of IndiaFebruary 28, 2001
  5. 5. 5Legislation introduced with effect from April 1, 2001.Generally in line with the OECD guidelinesCompliance RequirementsSteep PenaltiesDownward adjustment prohibitedArithmetic mean concept (+/- 5percent range permitted)No safe harbor provisionsNo provisions for Advance Pricing AgreementsMaintenance of contemporaneous documentationAnnual filing of Accountant’s ReportSynopsis of Indian Transfer Pricing Regulations
  6. 6. 6Overview of Transfer Pricing in IndiaEnd of Part I
  7. 7. 7Overview of Transfer Pricing in India
  8. 8. 8Applicability of Transfer Pricing Regulations• Any income arising from an international transaction shall be computed having regardto the arm’s length price• A price between unrelated parties is known as the “arm’s length price”• Transfer Pricing refers to the pricing of international transactions between twoassociated enterprisesTransfer PricingInternationalTransactionsArm’s LengthPriceAssociatedEnterpriseSec 92 shall not apply in a case wherethe computation of income has the effect of reducing the incomechargeable to tax or increasing the loss
  9. 9. 9ACBBoth A and B areassociatedenterprises of CD and E are also associatedenterprises of C since they havea common ultimate parent (A)ACB EDOutside IndiaIn IndiaOutside IndiaIn IndiaDirect or indirect participation(through one or moreintermediaries) in management,control or capital – Sec 92A(1)Associated EnterprisesThe above section is further supplemented by 13 clauseswhich enlist various situations under which two enterprises shall bedeemed to be AE’s – Sec 92A(2)
  10. 10. 10DeemedAssociatedEnterprisesCommonexecutivedirector(s)Loans inexcess of51% of totalassetsGuaranteesin excess of10% of totalborrowingsRelationshipsof mutualinterestCompletedependenceon IPRsExistence ofcommoncontrolSupply of rawmaterials (90%or more)Power toappoint morethan half ofdirectorsDeemed Associated Enterprises
  11. 11. 11•Transactions between two or more associated enterprises•Either or both of whom are non-residentsTransaction relates to:•purchase, sale or lease of tangible or intangible property; or•provision of services; or•lending or borrowing money; or•any other transaction having a bearing on the profits, income, losses orassets of the enterprises; or•mutual agreements or arrangements for allocation or apportionment of, or anycontribution to, any cost or expense incurredInternational Transactions
  12. 12. 12Third parties transactions deemed to be international transaction -Sec 92B(2)Sec 92B(2)A’s Parent 3rd partyAPrior agreementServicesA’s Parent 3rd partyA ServicesDetermination oftermsTransaction between A and 3rdparty also subject to transferpricing norms, if:•a prior agreement existsbetween A’s parent and 3rdparty; or•terms of transaction aredetermined in substance by A’sparent and 3rd partyDeemed International Transactions
  13. 13. 13Arm’s Length Price (ALP)•Price applied or proposed to be applied in a transaction between personsother than associated enterprises, in uncontrolled conditions•Computation of ALP –Determination of arm’s length prices using one of the Prescribed methodsIn case of more than one price – ALP = Arithmetic Mean of such prices+/- 5% variance to arm’s length “price” permitted – (Safe Harbor)Prescribed MethodsTraditional TransactionMethodTransactional ProfitMethodCost PlusMethodResale PriceMethodComparableUncontrolled PriceMethodProfit SplitMethodTransactional NetMargin Method
  14. 14. 14• Most appropriate method shall be the method best suited to the facts andcircumstances of each particular international transaction and which provides the mostreliable measure of an arm’s length price in relation to the international transaction• Factors considered for selection of the most appropriate method:– Nature and class of international transaction– Class of associated enterprise and functions performed– Availability, coverage and reliability of data– Degree of comparability between the International transaction– Extent to which reliable and accurate adjustments can be made– The nature, extent and reliability of assumptions for application of the methodSelection of Transfer Pricing MethodsChoice of transfer pricing method(TNMM – 72%, CUP – 19%, Others – 9%)
  15. 15. 15• Most Direct Method for testing ALP and thePrices are Benchmarked• Requires strict comparability in products,contractual terms, economic terms, etc.• Two types of CUPs available - Internal CUP& External CUP• Calls for adjustments to be made fordifferences which could materially affect theprice in the open market e.g.:– Difference in volume/quality of product– Difference in credit terms– Risks assumed– Geographic market• OECD - Priority to Internal CUP over ExternalCUP due to higher degree of comparabilityParent Co.Sub Co.TransferPriceUnrelated Co. XInternal CUP Outside IndiaIndiaUnrelated Co. YUnrelated Co. ZExternalCUPOutside IndiaIndiaComparable Uncontrolled Price Method (CUP)
  16. 16. 16• Compares the resale gross margin earned byassociated enterprise with the resale grossmargin earned by comparable independentdistributors• Preferred method for a distributor buyingpurely finished goods from a group company (ifno CUP available)• To be applied when a goods purchased orservice obtained from an AE is resold to anunrelated enterprise.• Under this method comparability is lessdependent on strict product comparability andadditional emphasis is on similarity of functionsperformed & risks assumedResale Price Method (RPM)Parent Co.Sub Co.Transfer PriceINR 75Unrelated Co. YResale PriceINR 100Outside IndiaIndiaPrice paid by Sub Co. to AE is atarm’s length if the 25% resalemargin earned by Sub Co. is morethan margins earned by similarIndian distributors
  17. 17. 17• Compares the mark up earned on direct andindirect costs incurred with that ofcomparable independent companies• Preferred method in case– Semi finished goods sold between relatedparties– Contract/toll manufacturing agreement– Long term buy/supply arrangements• To be applied in cases involving manufacture,assembly or production of tangible productsor services that are sold/provided to AEs• Identifies direct and indirect costs ofproduction of goods/services• Comparability under this method is not asmuch dependent on close physical similaritybetween the products.• Larger emphasis on functional comparabilityCost Plus Method (CPM)Parent Co.Sub Co.Transfer PriceINR 125Co.Y / AECOGSINR70Outside IndiaIndiaDirect Cost &Indirect Costof ProductionINR30Co. ZPrice charged by Sub co to AE is atarm’s length if the 25% mark up oncost is more than that of similarIndian assemblers
  18. 18. 18• To be applied in cases involving transfer of unique intangibles or in multipleinternational transactions that cannot be evaluated separately• Calculates the combined operating profit resulting from an inter-companytransaction based on the relative value of each AEs contribution to theoperating profit• Evaluates allocation of combined profit/loss in controlled integratedtransactions• The contribution made by each party is based upon a functional analysis andvalued, if possible, using external comparable data• The two methods discussed by OECD Guidelines– Contribution PSM Analysis– Residual PSM AnalysisProfit Split Method (PSM)
  19. 19. 19• Examines net operating profit from transactions as a percentage of a certainbase (can use different bases i.e. costs, turnover, etc) in respect of similarparties• Ideally, operating margin should be compared to operating margin earned bysame enterprise on uncontrolled transaction – Internal TNMM• Most frequently used method in India, due to lack of availability ofcomparable uncontrolled prices and gross margin data required forapplication of the comparable uncontrolled price method / cost plus method /resale price method• Broad level of product comparability and high level of functionalcomparability• Applicable for any type of transaction and often used to supplementanalysis under other methods• The application of the TNMM to a specific tested party breaks down whenfactors other than transfer prices have a material impact upon profitsUsually regarded as an indirect and one-sidedmethod, but is most widely usedTransactional Net Margin Method (TNMM)
  20. 20. 20• Grouping of transaction - Relevant controlled transactions require to be aggregatedto test whether the controlled transaction earn a reasonable margin as compared touncontrolled transaction• Selection of tested party - Least complex entity• Selection of Profit Level Indicator such as Operating Margin, Return on Value addedexpenses, Return on assets – Unaffected by the transfer price• Benchmarking exercise– Entity with similar industry classification to the tested party – thru search in Prowessand Capitalineplus databases– Screen entities by applying appropriate quantitative filters, such as mfg sales >75%,R&D exp >5%, Advertisement exp >5%.– Review financial and textual information available in the public database of theselected entities – for qualitative filters• Computation of ALP– Usage of single year data / multiple year data– Computation of arithmetic meanSteps involved in application of TNMM
  21. 21. 21Summary of MethodsNet ProfitMarginsProfit MarginsGPM (on costs)benchmarkedGPM (on sales)benchmarkedPrices arebenchmarkedApproachVery HighVery HighHighMediumMediumFunctionalComparabilityMost commonly usedMethodComplex Method,sparingly usedDifficult to apply ashigh degree ofcomparability requiredDifficult to apply ashigh degree ofcomparability requiredVery difficult to applyas very high degree ofcomparability requiredRemarksMediumPSMMediumTNMMHighCPLMHighRPMVery HighCUPProductComparabilityMethods
  22. 22. 22•An Indian company (‘IndCo’), mainlyengaged in the refining and sale of coppermetal•IndCo purchases crude metal from bothrelated and unrelated parties•Critical factors that affect the crude copperprice are –Volume;Tenure of supply contract (long terms, short-term)Alloy mix of product (copper crude come with orwithout small quantities of other metal alloyslike gold and silver)Other terms of contracts (FOB vs CIF, port ofshipment etc.)UnrelatedSupplier A(Japan)UnrelatedSupplier B(Russia)RelatedSupplierForCo (AUS)IndCo (India)Case Study I - Application of CUP MethodFacts
  23. 23. 23FOB basisCIF basisFOB basisOther TermsINR 28,500(applicable forentire year)INR 32,000(applicablefor entireyear)INR 29,500(applicable forentire year)Price (per MT)RussiaJapanAustraliaPort ofshipmentNone1% Gold, 1%silver0.5% Gold, 1%silverAlloy Mix9000 MT3000 MT2200 MTVolume duringyear underconsiderationShort Term (2yrs)Long Term (8yrs)Long Term (10yrs)Tenure ofContractUnrelated PartyB (Russia)UncontrolledUnrelatedParty A(Japan)UncontrolledRelated PartyForCo(Australia)ControlledCriteriaCase Study I - Application of CUP MethodComparison of Various CUPs
  24. 24. 24UnrelatedSupplier A(Japan)RelatedSupplierForCo (AUS)IndCo (India)• The controlled and uncontrolled arrangementsare comparable except in following areasDifferent alloy mix: Supplier A’s copper crudecontains a higher mix of gold, making the productmore expensiveDifference in terms of supply: Supplier A sells onCIF basis, whereas ForCo sells on FOB basis.• Other differences, including the difference involume and the term of contracts (10 yrs vs 8yrs) is not expected to influence the pricesCase Study I - Application of CUP MethodApplicability of CUP – Unrelated Supplier A
  25. 25. 25RelatedSupplierForCo (AUS)IndCo (India)• The controlled and uncontrolled arrangementshave following differencesDifference in volume: the difference in volumepurchased from ForCo and from Supplier B issignificant (2200 MT and 9000 MT)Different alloy mix: Supplier B’s copper crudedoes not contain any gold or silverDifferent port of shipments: Russia vs. AustraliaUnrelatedSupplier B(Russia)Case Study I - Application of CUP MethodApplicability of CUP – Unrelated Supplier B
  26. 26. 26• Best Method: given the availability of required data, CUP is the most appropriatemethod• Rejection of CUP related to Supplier B: the significant difference in volume renderthe Supplier B transactions unreliable as suitable adjustments cannot be made toaccount for the difference• Acceptance of CUP related to Supplier A: the uncontrolled transaction withSupplier A is comparable with the controlled transactions with ForCo. Although,certain adjustments need to be made• AdjustmentsDifference in pricing basis (FOB vs CIF) – add freight and insurance cost to ForCotransactionDifference in alloy mix – adjust Supplier A’s price to exclude price for highercontent of goldCase Study I - Application of CUP MethodConclusion
  27. 27. 27• Indian Auto ManufacturerFull fledged manufacturerR&D and IP with overseas parent• Limited international transaction - Import of clutchassembly• Financial Data of Indian entity:Revenues from end customers = INR 100Other operating costs = INR 13Case Study II - Application of the TNMMFacts
  28. 28. 28• Most Appropriate Method: given the availability of required data, the TNMM isthe best method• While applying the TNMM method, due consideration must be given to thefollowing -Industry characteristicsFAR analysisDifferences if any for which adjustments need to be made• Industry CharacteristicsOvercapacityCapital Intensive - Plant & Machinery, R&DPressure on Innovation / Product LaunchesGlobal scale v/s local requirementsExtreme Volume and Price risksComplex supply chainsCase Study II - Application of the TNMMAnalysis
  29. 29. 29Case Study II - Application of the TNMMIndustry Analysis
  30. 30. 30• Indian entity being the simpler entity is the tested party• Net Profit Margin (Net operating profits/sales) seems to be the most appropriateprofit level indicator• Cost based PLI can’t be used as the cost is affected by transfer prices• Asset based PLI can’t be used as sufficient information of comparable companies’asset base is not available• Internal TNMM not possible because of given facts and circumstances• External benchmarking suggest that the Indian entity should earn net profitmargin of 5 percent• Transfer Price = Final sales price – arm’s length net profit margin – operatingexpenses of tested party.• Therefore, transfer price = INR 100 – INR 5 - INR13 = INR 82Case Study II - Application of CUP MethodConclusion
  31. 31. 31Documentation Requirement & Form 3CEBB S R & Co.
  32. 32. 32Documentation Requirements• Profile of industry• Profile of group• Profile of Indian entity• Profile of associatedenterprises• Transaction terms• Functional analysis (functions,assets and risks)• Economic analysis (methodselection, comparablebenchmarking)• Forecasts, budgets,estimates• Agreements• Invoices• Pricing relatedcorrespondence(letters, emails etc)Entity related Price related Transaction relatedContemporaneous documentation – Applicable onlyif the value of the International transactions exceedsINR 1 Crore
  33. 33. 334152 3Transfer Pricing ProcessGatheringBackgroundInformationFinancialAnalysisAccountant’sReport6FunctionalAnalysisEconomicAnalysisIndustryAnalysis
  34. 34. 34• Preparationof projectplan • Search strategy• Access to local& globaldatabase• Analysis ofinternalcomparables• Judiciousidentification ofarm’s lengthrange• Understandexistingcostingmechanism• Determinationof billingmethodologyPre-projectplanningStage 2Stage 3Stage 4Functionalanalysis -InformationgatheringComparabledataAnalysis• Interviews• Questionnaires• Discussions withManagement• Characterisationof each entity• AgreementreviewsStage 5• Consultation withmanagement• Finalization ofTransfer pricingdocumentationIssuance of TransferPricing DocumentationStage 1Key to dos before finalizing TP Documentation
  35. 35. 35Accountant’s report• Obtained by every person entering intoan international transaction• To be filed by the due date for filingreturn of income• Opinion whether• Prescribed documents have beenmaintained• The particulars in the report are true andcorrectForm No. 3CEBForm No. 3CEB[See rule 10E][See rule 10E]Report from an accountant to be furnished underReport from an accountant to be furnished undersection 92E relating to international transaction(s)section 92E relating to international transaction(s)1.1. We have examined the accounts and records ofWe have examined the accounts and records of ENTITYENTITYNAME AND POSTAL ADDRESSNAME AND POSTAL ADDRESS -- PAN No.PAN No. relating to therelating to theinternational transactions entered into by the assesseeinternational transactions entered into by the assesseeduring the previous year ending on 31st March 2009.during the previous year ending on 31st March 2009.2.2. In our opinion proper information and documents as areIn our opinion proper information and documents as areprescribed have been kept by the assessee in respect ofprescribed have been kept by the assessee in respect ofthe international transaction(s) entered into so far asthe international transaction(s) entered into so far asappears from our examination of the records of theappears from our examination of the records of theassessee.assessee.3.3. The particulars required to be furnished under sectionThe particulars required to be furnished under section92E are given in the Annexure to this Form. In our opinion92E are given in the Annexure to this Form. In our opinionand to the best of our information and according to theand to the best of our information and according to theexplanations given to us, the particulars given in theexplanations given to us, the particulars given in theAnnexure are true and correct.Annexure are true and correct.Place :Place :Date :Date :ForForChartered AccountantsChartered Accountants
  36. 36. 36Stringent PenaltiesRs 100,000Failure to furnish accountant’sreport2% of the value of theinternationaltransactionFailure to furnish documents2% of the value ofeachinternationaltransactionFailure to maintain documents100-300% of tax onthe adjusted amountIn case of a post-inquiryadjustment, there is deemedto be a concealment of incomePenaltyDefaultHowever, penalty for concealment of income shall notbe levied if the taxpayer demonstrates that price charged or paid hasbeen determined in ‘good faith’ and with ‘due diligence’.
  37. 37. 37Transfer Pricing Audit Process & ExperienceB S R & Co.
  38. 38. 38Transfer Pricing Audit ProcessFile tax return & Accountant’s Report (30th September)Reference to be made to TP Officer (‘TPO’) by the AssessingOfficer (‘AO’); Compulsory Reference to be made by AOif international transactions exceed Rs 150 millionfor AY 2005-06 onwards (Internal guidelines)Appeal can be made againstthe order of AO as order ofTPO included within theorder of the AONotice to be issued by the TPO – TPO calls for supportingdocuments & evidenceRectification application can bemade against the order of TPOfor apparent mistakesTP AuditBased on results of above mentioned procedureassessing officer passes the orderAppeal ProcedureAppeal to Commissioner of Income TaxPasses an orderIncome Tax Appellate TribunalHigh Court – only on matters related to lawSupreme CourtConstitutional BenchAO makingadjustments ifinternationaltransactions are lessthan Rs 150 million& stay typicallyrejected
  39. 39. 39TP AssessmentSome important statistics (ESTIMATED)AY 2002-03Cases assessed = 1081Cases adjusted = 239Total adjustment = USD 305 MnAY 2003-04Cases assessed = 1501Cases adjusted = 337Total adjustment = USD 572 MnAY 2004-05Cases assessed = 1768Cases adjusted = 471Total adjustment = USD 858 MnAY 2005-06Cases adjusted = 25 percentTotal adjustment = USD 1100 MnCases adjusted heading northwards butonly a handful cases have managed to get past tribunal.Is it just the tip of the Iceberg?
  40. 40. 40• Steep expansion of administration [No. ofTransfer Pricing Officers (TPOs) from 18 to 80]• Coordinated All-India Transfer Pricing (TP)approach• Creation of special TP administration at CIT (A)and Tribunal level• Training to TPOs on international TP laws andpractices• Increase in audit threshold (from USD 1.25million to 3.75 million)• Scrutiny audit time increased from 33 months to45 months from the end of financial year• Co-ordination between Customs and TransferPricing authoritiesTP AssessmentIncreased Administrative Focus
  41. 41. 41• Consistent losses / low margins of theassessee attributable to inter-companytransactions• Significant changes in profitability of theassessee and its AEs• High value of royalty pay outs• Unjustifiably large payment of managementcharges not passing the ‘benefit test’• Losses incurred by routine distributors• Low mark-ups for servicesTP AssessmentTriggers for Detailed ScrutinyScrutiny by Specialized Transfer Pricing Officer> INR 15 CroreScrutiny by Assessing Officer< INR 15 CroreMandatory Documentation Requirements> INR 1 CroreRemarksTransaction Value
  42. 42. 42•Use of multiple year data•Arithmetical mean and + / - 5percent range•Use of adjustments – Idle capacity,risk adjustments etc•Use of secret comparables andconfidentiality of information•Foreign comparables challenged –local comparables preferred•Understanding thebusiness/operations of the company– at times business heads beingcalled/ examinedTP AssessmentChallenges•Information being sought ontransactions by AEs with other AEs –even though these may not bestrictly ‘uncontrolled’ comparables•Indiscriminate usage of CUP Method– Localized product – CUP for imports– use of NASSCOM rates for IT/ITESindustry•Materiality not applied•Genuine cost allocation and Headoffice charges are probed withsuspicion
  43. 43. 43TP AssessmentKey Points for success in Transfer Pricing audits in India• Proactive TP analysis• Detailed FAR analysis– Assessee– Associated Enterprises– Comparables• Evaluating potential risk adjustments• Determination of income attributable to a PermanentEstablishment in India• Strong and robust Transfer pricing documentation• Global TP Policy – Need for localization and regularreview• Proactively determining the audit strategy• Leveraging on the favorable evolving TP judicialdecisions• Strategically, ensuring the furnishing of adequateevidence / supporting documentation to effectivelystake claims during initial TP audits
  44. 44. 44Overview of Transfer Pricing in IndiaEnd of Part II
  45. 45. 45Industry Challenges &Synopsis on Recent Judicial RulingsB S R & Co.
  46. 46. 46Transfer Pricing Challenges – Manufacturing• Type of manufacturing (tollmanufacturer, contract manufacturer,licensed manufacturer and full fledgedmanufacturer)• Royalty – Legal ownership Vs. EconomicOwnership• Import of components (proprietary innature); Internal pricing policydisregarded;• Localized product – a CUP for imports• Economic adjustments for start upcompanies always questioned
  47. 47. 47Transfer Pricing Challenges – Trading / Distribution• Most appropriate method - RPM Vs.TNMM• Use of GPM as a PLI - Absence ofdefinition of direct cost under IGAAP• How Important is product comparability• Different margins for low/ high valueproducts• Creation of market intangible• Allowance of risk adjustment to facilitatebetter comparison betweencommissionaire, low risk distributor andfull fledged distributor
  48. 48. 48Transfer Pricing Challenges – IT / ITES• Captives are risk mitigated – Cannotincur operating losses• Value chain analysis for serviceproviders• To whom do locational savings belong?• Use of standard benchmarking sets forIT/ITES companies• What are costs and mark-up?• Allowance of risk adjustment (CaptiveVs full fledged service provider) &adjustment pertaining to varyingaccounting policies and forex gain/loss.
  49. 49. 49Skoda Auto India Private Limited
  50. 50. 50Skoda Auto IndiaFacts of the Case• Incorporated on December 1999, started commercial production in November 2001;• FY 2002-03 – 1st full year of operations; Assessment Year 2003-04• Engaged in the business of manufacturing and selling passenger cars – Turnover – INR 383Cr , Loss – INR (2.61) Cr;• Loss incurred due to incurrence of high start up cost and low utilisation• International transactions– Purchase of raw materials - INR 224.3 Cr– Payment of royalty and fees for technical know how for INR 44.5 Cr– Other International transactions – INR 1.08 Cr• Assessee adopted TNMM for both transactions & Internal CUP selected as supplementarymethod for material purchase.• CUP furnished was EURO 6800 / kit which was the ex-factory selling price of the kits bythe parent company to other AEs across various jurisdictions5.47%4 (Maruti, Honda, Hyundai & HM)2002-03NPMSkoda AutoTPOLoss VsLoss6 (GM, Ford, Maruti, Honda,Hyundai & HM)2000-01 to 2002-03NPMSkoda AutoSkoda AutoALPComparable CompaniesFinancial PeriodPLITested PartyParticulars
  51. 51. 51Skoda India’s objections• Comparables should be selected based on the functional comparability;• Skoda’s business model is different from the other 4 comparables also as Skoda isonly an assembler• Skoda India is in the start-up phase - while the comparables are well establishedcompanies and therefore, the comparison is absurd;• Due to imported raw material content being 99% there is a material cascading effecton account of customs duty unlike that of the comparables (25% to 56%). Henceshould be adjusted for the same;• Carried out adjustment for eliminating CD effect based on reasonable approximation• Appellant should be granted a relaxation of up to 5% from the arm’s length price.
  52. 52. 52Department’s ArgumentsAO made assessment in conformity with the TPO’s order.CIT(A) dismissed all contentions of Skoda India for non-cooperation and wantof details in general terms and concurred with AO’s decision• Internal CUP rejected due to irreconcilable geographical differences and the transactionbeing between associated enterprises• TPO noted that GM had incurred continuous losses for three years which were indicativeof certain abnormalities• The TPO further sought for details on CD adjustment carried out and rejected the same onaccount of approximations and assumptions made by Skoda India• TPO also stated that Skoda India should have negotiated the purchase price to eliminatethe burden of non-cenvatable CD or should have ideally passed it on to the customer.• TPO rejected the 5% benefit on the ground that the variation in ALP is beyond 5%• TPO rejected all contentions and made adjustment for INR 23.59 crores towards purchasetransaction.• TPO did not make any adjustment towards Royalty & Fees for technical know how as anyexcessive expenditure would be adequately covered in NPM of Skoda India.
  53. 53. 53Tribunal’s ObservationsSkoda India’s contentions• Argued for usage of multiple year data (submitting data on the peculiarities of the automobilemarket)• Inclusion of GM on account of similar product profile• Difference in capacity utilisation• Since Skoda India is in start up phase its share of imported components is higher resulting inhigher customs duty payout and fall in profitability.• Inherent difference in business models• Benefit of 5% to be grantedDR’s contentions• Benefit of 5% not to be granted as the variation is beyond 5% from the ALP• Since Skoda India did not cooperate at the CIT(A) level, the tribunal should not deal with thematter on merit.• Apart from objecting to Skoda India’s technical arguments, it also objected to the fact thatthe assessee has raised new matters which were not raised in earlier proceedingsITAT rejected revenue’s contention that is should not deal with the matter on merits; sincethe information sought by the CIT(A) was not available in the public domain
  54. 54. 54Tribunal’s Ruling• Internal CUP rejected as benchmark prices used are also controlled transactions.• Since the business model of Skoda India and comparable companies is different, anadjustment in the operating margins to eliminate the impact of higher import content needsto be made to eliminate the functional differences• If the business model are the same the unusual costs incurred during start up phase needsto be eliminated to enhance comparability• Reasonable assumptions and approximations is acceptable in case of non-availability ofinformation in the public domain• Allowance of the multiple year data hinges on acceptance of the theory of product cyclehaving a material effect on the ALP.• 5% benefit should be granted to Skoda India• Remanded back the file to the TPO for fresh adjudication with following instructionsto consider:• Impact of additionally borne non-cenvatable import duties• The analysis of imports for the subsequent years to verify reduction in imports• The relevance of product cycle and its impact on operating profit margins• Other options to neutralize the impact of higher costs during setup phase;
  55. 55. 55UCB India Private Limited
  56. 56. 56Facts of the CaseUCB S.A. BelgiumUCB IndiaIndiaOutside IndiaInternal CUPNot AvailableExternalCUPSaleofAPIAssessment 2002-03 & 2003-04Unrelated Co. AUnrelated Co. BUnrelated Co. C ChinaUnrelated Co. DAssessee used TNMM with UCB India as Tested partyUCB India at 27.54% operating margins vis-à-vis Comparables at 8.84%.
  57. 57. 57Transfer Pricing Officer’s CUP workings2,09,75,500Total5,31,0005,31027,07532,385100 KgsMesna2,04,44,5001,319381*1,70015,500 KgsPiracetamAdjustmentDifferenceComparablePriceper KgRate ofpurchase(Rs. Kg)QuantitypurchasedActiveIngredient* This is the Wt. Average rate of Piracetam from Torrent Pharma and Microlabs India.Rs. 2,47,30,889Arms length price (A) - (B)Rs. 2,09,75,500Adjustment as proposed above (B)Rs. 4,57,06,389Value of international transaction disclosed (A)TPO adopted CUP & made adjustment for INR 2.09 & 3.00 Cr inthe AY 2002-03 & 2003-04 respectively.
  58. 58. 58UCB’s ObjectionsSelection of TNMM• Robust FAR analysis done by UCB India &complied with all requirements as stipulated inRule 10D.• UCB India further contended that TNMM as themost appropriate method as a result of robustanalysis.Non-applicability of CUP• Absence of information in public domain;• TPO’s comparables hinges entirely on threeletters from the competitors and no furtheranalysis carried out by the TPO;• Irreconcilable differences on parameters likepurity, potency, standards, research activity,market share, pricing, efficacy, etc.; and• The department failed to carry out functionalanalysis
  59. 59. 59Department’s ArgumentsRejection of TNMM• UCB India failed to furnish documentation as required by Rule 10D. Hence, Onus to satisfyALP still on the assessee;• UCB India considered the net profit of the whole entity rather than transactional level profit;and• UCB India failed in demonstrating the functional comparability of the 36 comparablecompanies selected as to whether they manufactured licensed and patented drugs,employed intangibles, etc.Adoption of CUP• UCB India had not produced any document / supplied any information to demonstrate non-comparability of the transactions selected by the Department;• UCB India failed to maintain proper documentation and the information and data relied on byUCB India were not reliable; and• Rule 10D requirements not fully discharged.Tribunal’s observation• Tribunal held that 92C(3)(a) has been attracted since UCB India has not determined the ALPin accordance with 92C(1) and 92C(2) – i.e., rejection of TNMM
  60. 60. 60Tribunal’s RulingRule 10D compliance• What needs to be seen is whether the assessee has substantially complied with the law inrelation to maintenance of records.• Deficiency should be seen in light of fact that whether such non-maintenancefundamentally affects or distorts the computation of ALP.Entity level Vs. Transactional level• International transaction under consideration comprised only 50% of UCB India’s sales &hence it was held that UCB India’s approach of entity level TNMM is not appropriate.Comparability Analysis• Functional comparability of comparables needs to be documented to demonstrate that thecompanies selected manufactured licensed and patented drugs, employed intangibles, etc.similar to UCB India.• Even if CUP is selected regard should be had to the effect on price of broader businessfunctions and not just the product comparability and adjustment should be made toeliminate any material effect on the transfer prices.Sent to AO for adjudication of the issue afreshThe ITAT allowed UCB to adopt any method prescribed. It also allowed UCB tosubmit additional evidences, information and fresh transferpricing study to support its case
  61. 61. 61Philips Software Centre Private Limited
  62. 62. 62Facts of the case• Business: Software development servicesto its associated enterprises.• Taxpayer enjoying Tax Holiday u/s 10A• Remuneration Model:– From 1 April 2002 to 31 December 2002– Cost plus 5% mark-up– From 01 January to 31 March 2003 –Cost plus 10% mark-up(Cost– All costs including personnel, travel,infrastructure and depreciation)• Arm’s length margin proposed by TPO –21.14%. Resulted in adjustment of Rs.221,080,792Approach in the TP Study• Cost-plus method as the most appropriatemethod (gross profit mark up); and, TNMMas the secondary approach with PhilipsIndia as the tested party• Classified as risk insulated captive softwaredevelopment service provider bearingminimal risks• Performed benchmarking using Capitalineonly using data for FY 2002-03• Various Filters used - Fin NA; < 12 m Findata; 250<T/O<5 cr; Export T/o<75% ofTotal sales; RPT, loss making at gross level,diversified services – Final set of 9comparable companies• Claimed adjustment related to depreciation• Comparables GPM- 13.27%, NCP- (6.75%);Philips- GPM- 28.86%, NCP- 6.61%Philips Software
  63. 63. 63TP study carried out by the taxpayer cannot be disregarded unlessthere are serious deficiencies thereinFresh SearchTPO required to substantiate during assessment proceedings that thetaxpayer had manipulated prices to shift profits outside IndiaTrigger points forTP assessmentTribunal’s DecisionIssue discussedStandard deduction of +/- 5 percent on ALP is available at the optionof the taxpayerSafe HarborProvisionsAdjustments need to be made to comparable companies on account ofrisk profiles, working capital position and accounting policies (includingfor depreciation).Adjustments toimprovecomparabilityComparables having controlled transactions of even a single rupee oftransaction should not be used as the basis for a comparabilityanalysisRelated PartytransactionsTPO cannot conduct a fresh search using data beyond the ‘specifieddate’ContemporaneousdocumentationPhilips Software
  64. 64. 64Sony India Private Limited
  65. 65. 65Sony IndiaFacts of the case• Sony India was engaged in assembly and distribution of colour televisions and audioproducts including certain high-end electronic goods• International Transactions – Import of electronic components, exports of television setsand receipt of reimbursement of advertisement expenses.TPO’s comments• Trading and manufacturing activities of the taxpayer were not interlinked and should beconsidered separately.• AEs cannot be taken as tested parties while determining ALP of imported electroniccomponents and finished goods.• Excluded comparables on the basis of “having related party transactions”• Rejected the use of marginal costing criteria for pricing to AEs on account of unutilized idlecapacity• Reimbursement of advertisement expenditure received from AEs was considered as acapital subsidy and removed while computing the operating profitability of the taxpayer.• Did not allow the benefit of 5 % range to the taxpayer while computing the ALP.
  66. 66. 66Sony IndiaAn entity can be taken as uncontrolled if its related party transaction donot exceed 10 to 15 percent of total revenue.Related PartytransactionsAllowed deduction of 20% from the mean margin of comparables onaccount of difference in risk profile, ownership of intangibles, workingcapital and R&D.Adjustmentsto improvecomparabilityThe benefit of the 5% range is available to the taxpayers in all the casesand the TP adjustment should be restricted only on the net amountremaining after allowing the benefit of 5% rangeSafe HarborProvisionsTribunal’s DecisionIssuediscussedActual transaction entered into between the parties is to be considered.Revenue authorities were not justified in equating this reimbursement withequity or windfall gain or subsidy or some ad hoc paymentRecognition oftransactionUnder-utilization of capacity, burden of overheads and motive to reducethem cannot justify export of products at a price less than the price to anyunrelated party.Pricing basedon MC to AEsto improverecovery of FC
  67. 67. 67Mentor Graphics (Noida) Pvt. Ltd.
  68. 68. 68Mentor GraphicsExport of marketingsupport servicesSoftware DevelopmentServicesInternationalTransactionTNMMTNMMMethod ofcomputing ALPNilTime & Materialbasis3,436,19414,573,857Time & Materialbasis88,866,320TPO’s AdjustmentINRMethod ofremunerationValue of IT INRFacts of the Case• Mentor Graphics was a wholly ownedsubsidiary of IKOS Systems Inc. USA• Mentor Graphics renders softwaredevelopment and marketing services to IKOSSystems Inc.• Software developed by Mentor Graphics isused by IKOS Systems Inc. for integration withthe other software components developed bythe latter.• The whole software in turn supports thehardware manufactured by IKOS Systems Inc.16 Comparables- 13.41%Vs. Mentor Graphics-11.07%(within 5% range)Comp. of ALP1999-2000 to 2001-02Financial dataMfg Sales >25%Trading Sales > 25%Operating Loss > 10%Filters UsedTNMMMAMNet Cost Plus mark upPLIMentor GraphicsTested Party
  69. 69. 69Mentor GraphicsArguments & Final VerdictTP Assessment and CIT(A)• TPO rejected comparables selected by MentorGraphics’ and conducted a fresh search• TPO considered single year data and determined anarithmetical mean of 24.53% (5 Comparables)• AO confirmed the TPO’s order and on appeal, CIT(A)confirmed the AO’s order14,573,857Adjustment (103.44 Mnless 88.86 Mn)103,440,177ALP of revenue20,375,713Add: Margin @ 24.53%83,064,464Cost of ServiceITAT’s Observations & Ruling• Comparables selected should be rejected only if they are deficient or insufficient.• Comparable companies having related party transactions should not be accepted andassessment should be based on material on record, not on unsound presumptions• Adjustment for normal open market risks, from which the taxpayer is insulated from, being acaptive service provider should be provided such as working capital, risk & growth andR&D expenses.• If taxpayer’s margin falls anywhere in the ‘range’ it would be sufficient compliance (ALP isnot the highest price or the highest profit margin in a range)• FAR analysis should also be done of comparable companies in a comprehensive manner
  70. 70. 70DocComplianceSelection ofMAMSkoda AutoHoneywellUCB IndiaPhilips SoftwareSony IndiaDevelop. Consult.Star IndiaAggregationof ITTestedPartyE-GainCargillRanbaxyMentor GraphicsAztecLawRulingSnapshot of Recent Rulings
  71. 71. 71Adjustment Multipleyear dataRPTSkoda AutoHoneywellUCB IndiaSafeHarbourPhilips SoftwareSony IndiaDevelop. Consult.Star IndiaE-GainCargillRanbaxyMentor GraphicsAztecComparabilityStandardRulingSnapshot of Recent Rulings
  72. 72. 72Unanswered IssuesKey Takeaways&B S R & Co.
  73. 73. 73Key Takeaways from Recent Rulings• Transfer Pricing is not an exact science andinvolves a fair amount of objective reasoning /approximations.• No need to establish diversion of profits outsideIndia to determine applicability of the TP provisions• Detailed FAR analysis crucial• Aggregation of International transactionspermissible only if they are inextricably linked• Least complex entity to be tested party• Multiple adjustments accepted if it enhancescomparability and irons out material differences• Option to avail safe harbor provisions rests purelywith the taxpayer• Usage of reasonable approximation if inevitable ispermissible• Documentation to be filed by the assessee only ifavailable
  74. 74. 74Unanswered issues• Whether one should take cognizance of thegroup’s global profitability scenario?• Whether high margin and loss making companiescan be removed from a set of comparables?• Whether to use standalone financial / consolidatedfinancial statement of comparable companies?• Whether companies having related partytransactions can be completely eliminated fromthe set of comparables? Does use of consolidatedresults help?• What is the definition of contemporaneous data?• How would a risk adjustment be made?• How would an adjustment for presence ofintangibles be made?• Acceptance of secret comparables
  75. 75. 75Overview of Transfer Pricing in IndiaEnd of Part III
  76. 76. 76© 2006 BSR & Co., a firm of Chartered Accountants, duly registered under the Indian Partnership Act, 1932. All rights reserved.BSR & Co.Impact on Transfer Pricing during RecessionB S R & Co.
  77. 77. 77Transfer Pricing in a Recessionary EconomyCarefully Document the “Functional & Risk Profile”• Specify up-front the functions performed and risksassumed by each related party to the transaction:Source of losses and which entity should bear thelosses:• Without contemporaneous evidence of taxpayer intent, itmay be difficult to convince tax authorities after the factAvoid Sudden Changes in Transfer Prices• The fact that risks were realized and losses wereincurred is not necessarily a reason to adjust previouslynegotiated transfer prices or to make compensatingpayments• Changes to the transfer pricing policy today, in responseto an economic downturn, could raise questionsconcerning past transfer pricing positions• Averaging results over the business cycle may mitigatetemporary downturns in performance
  78. 78. 78Draw Attention to Impact of Realized Risks• State the original intent of the parties with respect tofunctions and risks• Show that past transfer pricing results were commensuratewith the functions and risks set forth at the initiation of thetransaction• Describe the specific risks that were realized by each partyduring the test period, and quantify the economic impacts• Adjust the tested party results as if the risks had notmaterializedClosely Scrutinize Benchmark Companies• Closely screen comparable companies for signs of seriousfinancial distress, and consider rejecting all companies inspecific sectors that experience unique disruption unrelatedto tested party situation• In the final analysis, make sure your basis of presentationfor tested party performance (i.e., adjusted vs. unadjusted)is consistent with your treatment of similar issues forcompanies in the benchmark setTransfer Pricing in a Recessionary Economy
  79. 79. 79Don’t Try to Force Fit an Approach• Describe overall company performance and the factors driving the results (internal-operational, external-market, and competitive dynamics)• Describe the effects that similar economic shocks have had on companies inanalogous situations in the past• Articulate why decline in results are not driven by inappropriate transfer prices• Describe why the relative performance of both sides of the transaction is appropriatein light of the relative profiles of functions and risksMaintain Current Transfer Pricing Documentation• During business downturns, be especially vigilant in monitoring transfer pricing resultsperiodically throughout the year• Keep track of market and operational factors driving overall company performance,and relate it back to transfer pricing results in “real time”• Develop comprehensive documentation prior to filing each year’s tax return to protectthe company from penaltiesTransfer Pricing in a Recessionary Economy
  80. 80. 80• Detailed guidance on specific transfer pricing issues• Synchronization of transaction value with Customs Act• Guidance on Intangibles, services, cost sharing,treatment of losses, income attribution to PE• Improving dispute resolution process & Introduction ofAPAs• MAP - Aim to relieve taxpayers from economic doubletaxation• Guidance on collateral consequences of upwardadjustments• Guidance on Compensating adjustments• Introduction of correlative relief, secondary adjustment,set-offsEmerging Trends

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