Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

yeah

120 views

Published on

yyeah

Published in: Education
  • Login to see the comments

  • Be the first to like this

yeah

  1. 1. WELCOME TO SEMINAR PRESENTATION 2015 M.S COURSE NO : 508 1
  2. 2. PRESENTED BY: Jasmin Naher Shemo Exam. Roll No : 58 Reg. No : 2366 Secession : 2007-08 Department of Food and Nutrition Home Economics College 2
  3. 3. TITLE : HYGIENIC AND SANITARY PRACTICES OF VENDORS OF STREET FOODS IN NAIROBI, KENYA. Authors : Onesmus Kilungu Muinde. (M.Sc.), Elizabeth Kuria, (Ph.D.), African Journal of Food Agriculture and Nutritional Development (AJFAND): Volume 5 No 1 2005 3
  4. 4. CONTENTS Page Introduction 05 Objectives 06 Methodology 07 Result 08 Discussion 14 Conclusion 15 References 16 4
  5. 5. INTRODUCTION  The street food industry plays an important role in developing countries in meeting the food demands of the urban dwellers. Street food vendors were not aware of hygienic and sanitary practice. This paper sought to addresses various aspects of hygienic practices and to reduce food borne diseases. 5
  6. 6. OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY General Objective To study the hygiene and sanitary practices of the street food vendors in relation to street food in selected locations of Nairobi, Kenya.  Specific Objectives  To study the morbidity and nutritional status of street food consumers in selected locations of Nairobi, Kenya.  To study the hygiene, sanitary condition and environment al sanitation of street food in selected locations of Nairobi, Kenya. 6
  7. 7. METHODS:  Type of study: Descriptive study.  Study population: 20% of total population.  Study location: Dandora and Kayole estates.  Methods: There are two ways to identify the nutritional status of street food consumers and the hygienic and sanitary condition of street food. These are:  Interviewing method.  Observational method  Analysis of data: Data was analyzed using the statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) program. 7
  8. 8. RESULT :  The result are showing in the figure…….. 8
  9. 9. ACQUISITION OF KNOWLEDGE ON FOOD PREPARATION It was important to know how the vendors acqui red their cooking skills to establish their knowledge in handling street food. Most (61%) of the vendors acquired cooking skills from observation, 33.3% were taught by their parents while 6.3% gained the skills by trial and error (self taught). Figure 1 show s how vendors in Kayole and Dandora acquired food preparation skills. Figure: 01. Acquisition of food preparation skills by the street food vendors in kayole and dendora estates 9
  10. 10. PLACE OF PREPARATION OF STREET FOODS Findings show that vendors prepared the foods e ither at home or at the stalls, which were located by the roadsides. Most of the stalls were made of polythene bags and wood. Vendors selling mutura, fish, fruit salad, roasted maize, mandazi and chips prepared their foods in the stalls. Sixty percen t of the vendors of the sausages prepared them in the stalls while 82% of vendors of githeri prepared it at home. The results are shown in Figure 2. Figure: 02. Place of food preparation 10
  11. 11. ENVIRONMENTAL SURROUNDING OF THE STREET FOOD VENDORS It was observed that, houseflies were present in most of the stalls (Figure 3). Flies were present in all stalls selling Mutura, fish and fruit salad. With about 80% of vendors of roasted maize, flies were not presen t. With most of the vendors selling Mandazi (80%), chips (70%) and githeri (90%), flies were not present. Figure: 03. presence of files on different street food 11
  12. 12. ENVIRONMENTAL SURROUNDING OF THE STREET FOOD VENDORS It was observed that, houseflies were present in most of the stalls (Figure 3). Flies were present in all stalls selling Mutura, fish and fruit salad. With about 80% of vendors of roasted maize, flies were not presen t. With most of the vendors selling Mandazi (80%), chips (70%) and githeri (90%), flies were not present. Figure: 03. presence of files on different street food 12
  13. 13. METHODS FOR PACKAGING AND STORAGE OF LEFTOVERS Vendors stored left-over food open place (26%), refrig erator (21%), and plastic containers (21%) while 16% kept them either in polythene bags or in cupboards for sale in the next day. Various methods used by the vendors to package and store the leftovers are shown in Figure 5. Figure: 04. Methods used by vendors to store and contain left-over foods 13 Plastic Container, 21% Cupboard, 16% Refrigerator, 21% Open Place, 26% Polythene Bag, 16%
  14. 14. DISCUSSION:  Most of the street food vendors neither underwent any form of formal training in food preparation nor did they attempt to seek it. According to FAO, food handlers should have the necessary knowledge and skills to enable them to handle food hygienically.  The street foods were prepared in unhygienic and sanitary conditions. According to FAO adequate drainage and waste disposal systems and facilities should be provided in the street food industry and designed properly so that the risk of contamination of food and potable water is low. 14
  15. 15. CONCLUSION: This paper recommends that every vendor, helper or food handler should undergo a basic training in food hygiene. This is to ensure that they follow the required rules for proper hygiene and sanitation. 15
  16. 16. REFERENCES:  FAO. Agriculture food and nutrition for Africa. A resource book for teachers of Agriculture. FAO, Rome. 1997: 123.  FAO. Street foods. FAO, Rome. 1997:1-4.  FAO Food hygiene basic texts. FAO, Rome. 1997: 14-32  FAO. International conference on nutrition, plan of action for nutrition. FAO, Rome.1992:24-26. 16
  17. 17. 17 THANK YOU

×