Animal's american dream

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Animal's american dream

  1. 1. How Do Animals Achieve their “ American Dream ” ? By: Kendall Beard
  2. 2. American Dream ? <ul><li>When most people think of the their American dream it is all about the future. Go to school, get good grades, get into a good college, get a good job, and have a happy family. That is the typical path that most people will take and hopefully end up with a loving family. When you have a family you think about being able to give your them what they need and want in order for them to be happy. Do you think only humans think like this? </li></ul>
  3. 3. Animals Dream Too ! <ul><li>Animals may not think about getting good grades to get into college like humans but they do have life goals and . </li></ul>ambitions. Family is one goal that humans and animals have in common
  4. 4. Animals and Their Families <ul><li>Animal mothers will go through just about anything for their young just like a your mother would have done for you. They will fight for them, protect them, and take care of them until </li></ul>they are able to do so for themselves. The matriarchs of animal families are relied upon for many different things.
  5. 5. Gorilla Mommies <ul><li>Gorilla’s family dynamic is so complex that it in ways resemble the human’s family situation. Gorilla babies learn by imitating their mother’s actions much like how human babies learn also. The bond between </li></ul><ul><li>a gorilla mother and her young is very strong. The baby will cling to his mother wherever she may go starting right after they are born, they also insist on almost constant contact for about to first six months. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Elephant Mothers <ul><li>The matriarch of the elephant family uses her knowledge to help her family stay together and to be healthy. Immediately starting out the elephant mothers help their newborn to stand and teach him how to nurse. </li></ul><ul><li>Mothers and others help teach the calf what is proper to eat and how to find it. Mothers and aunts are almost always in close proximity to the newborn calf to make sure he is doing okay. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Tiger Moms <ul><li>Tigers of all moms have to be the most protective of the bunch. The tigress will move her cubs to a new location if she even senses that they are in any kind of danger. </li></ul><ul><li>For the first few months of the cubs’ lives the mother rarely leaves her babies alone only to hunt. The cubs spend most of their childhood playing and pouncing with their mother and siblings. The tigress is also responsible for teaching her cubs how to hunt and catch their own pray when they are old enough. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Otter Mamas <ul><li>Otter moms are another over-protective mother their pups. Since the pups are born blind, toothless, and almost immobile their mother has to be their eyes and ears to keep them safe at all times. Otter pups are born on land but when their mother has to go into the water she will put all of her pups on her stomach and float with them right there. If the mother </li></ul><ul><li>has to dive into the water she will wrap a piece of seaweed around her young so that they don’t drift away. She spends almost all of the first few months of her pups lives cleaning and protecting them. </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>As you have noticed humans are not the only mammals that want to protect their offspring, so do animals. Moms can sometimes get to be too much </li></ul>to handle but you always have to remember that they are doing it to make sure you are safe. They want you to have more positive opportunities than they did.
  10. 10. Work cited <ul><li>Gorilla’s </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/episodes/the-gorilla-king/gorilla-family-dynamics/735/ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.seaworld.org/animal-info/info-books/gorilla/birth-&-care.htm </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Elephant’s </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/unforgettable/society.html </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.seaworld.org/animal-info/info-books/elephants/birth-&-care.htm </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Tiger’s </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.seaworld.org/animal-info/info-books/tiger/birth-&-care.htm </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Otter’s </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.seaworld.org/animal-info/info-books/otters/birth-&-care.htm </li></ul></ul>

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