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How To Build a Fire Pit in the Woods (Without Getting Injured)

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One of the most important outdoor survival skill to have is an understanding of how to safely build a fire pit. Learning this skill gives you the know-how to keep warm and cook food in cold weather, not to mention, acting as a line of defense from other animals.

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How To Build a Fire Pit in the Woods (Without Getting Injured)

  1. 1. (Without Getting Injured) By Ken Jensen
  2. 2. • One of the most important outdoor survival skill to have is an understanding of how to safely build a fire pit. • Learning this skill gives you the know-how to keep warm and cook food in cold weather, not to mention, acting as a line of defense from other animals.
  3. 3. • It’s advised that you clear out at least a 10-foot area around your fire pit. To do this, remove any tree limbs, grass, and leaves from the clearing around your fire pit. • You can always use a hoe to better clear out this area. However, while doing this it's important that you do not disturb any current ecosystems or homes of other emails.
  4. 4. • Decide how big your fire pit should be, then start digging! However, aim to have your fire pit to be at least one foot deep (1.5 feet is ideal). • Most people use a shovel to dig their fire pit, but we found it more helpful to first use a how to loosen the dirt, and then start digging.
  5. 5. • You should outline your fire pit with rocks to prevent your fire from spreading past the pit. • It’s best to look for large rocks to rest a fire poker on, and further prevent any sparks from igniting the grass outside your fire pit. • Rocks that you should not use include limestone and chalks since the heat from your fire can break them down.
  6. 6. • Tinder is commonly known as the easiest and smallest tool to help get your fire going include: wax, lint, fire starters, cardboard and wood shavings. • Kindling is the next step up from kindling and usually consist of small branches or twigs. • Firewood is the fuel of the fire. This type of wood should be one to five inches in diameter and can be anything from whole to split logs. • Matches & lighters are your tools to light your fire.
  7. 7. • You can now get warm or cook a delicious meal.
  8. 8. 1. Pour water on all of your logs, including embers, until it stops hissing. 2. Stir your campfire remains with a shovel to leave no flame or ember unturned. 3. Scrape off embers on remaining logs and drench them with water. 4. Keep stirring your fire until everything is cool to the touch. 5. If you’re out of water, feel free to use dirt. Mix the dirt with the embers until they turn dark. It’s important that you do not bury your fire and mix it instead. If you bury it, your fire will keep on soldering and catch tree roots on fire, which may spread to a wildfire. 6. If you're hunting small animals you'll need to build a fire that is at least 2 feet wide in order to cook them properly.
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