California: Part 2 <ul><li>Kelsey Taylor </li></ul><ul><li>History 141 </li></ul>
Panama Canal <ul><li>50 mile shortcut to the pacific that changes history </li></ul><ul><li>begun in the 1880’s- remarkabl...
Panama Canal <ul><li>1st step- cutting a path out of the jungle vegetation by hand, calculated the amount of excavation th...
Panama Canal <ul><li>the project initially intended for ships became the biggest railroad undertakings of all time </li></...
Panama Canal <ul><li>locks were constructed in 36 foot sections </li></ul><ul><li>end to end, the locks were 1,000 feet lo...
Los Angeles Aquaduct <ul><li>Mulholland envisioned a city like Dublin which was where he grew up </li></ul><ul><li>Los Ang...
Los Angeles Aquaduct <ul><li>tried to make Los Angeles live within is means but growth sabotaged everything he did </li></...
Los Angeles Aquaduct <ul><li>new river route would pass through San Fernando valley </li></ul><ul><li>after all the land w...
Los Angeles Aqueduct <ul><li>took 5 years to build </li></ul><ul><li>struggles included: no water, extreme heat and cold <...
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California part2

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California part2

  1. 1. California: Part 2 <ul><li>Kelsey Taylor </li></ul><ul><li>History 141 </li></ul>
  2. 2. Panama Canal <ul><li>50 mile shortcut to the pacific that changes history </li></ul><ul><li>begun in the 1880’s- remarkable ingenuity </li></ul><ul><li>Panama was the most difficult and dangerous place at that time </li></ul><ul><li>canal isnt just merely a trench all at sea level, ts a series of locks that raise and lower the ships to the appropriate levels </li></ul><ul><li>locks are like a giant water elevator or water steps which lift ships a total of 85 feet </li></ul><ul><li>Suez canal creation was cause for great jubilation 10 years earlier </li></ul><ul><li>Ferdinand Lessups: the engineer of the Suez canal, wanted to take on the panama project as well </li></ul><ul><li>Gaudin Delepinay: says a canal dug at sea level is doomed </li></ul><ul><ul><li>comes up with and describes a plan with locks but the people dont believe him, their trust is with Lessups </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Panama Canal <ul><li>1st step- cutting a path out of the jungle vegetation by hand, calculated the amount of excavation that needed to done then started digging </li></ul><ul><li>many engineers died of smallpox, typhoid, snake bites, food poisoning, malaria, yellow fever yet still others followed, all for the glory of France </li></ul><ul><li>DeLessups was doubted as to whether he was a canal or grave digger </li></ul><ul><li>French engineers were taught to solve problems by computation not improvisation </li></ul><ul><li>money ran out, the size of the task was too great </li></ul><ul><li>French did about 1/3 of the job, considered the pioneers </li></ul><ul><li>Roosevelt became the president of the United States and had many aspirations, including taking over the Panama Canal project </li></ul><ul><li>Theodore Stevens came to FDR with a new lock system that seemed like it might work for his new project </li></ul><ul><li>simple gravity would be the force at work with this new idea </li></ul>
  4. 4. Panama Canal <ul><li>the project initially intended for ships became the biggest railroad undertakings of all time </li></ul><ul><li>Dam at the Chagras River made the biggest manmade river in the world </li></ul><ul><li>yellow fever was eradicated </li></ul><ul><li>Roosevelt went to Panama to check on the progress and it was the 1st time a president had left the country while still in office </li></ul><ul><li>Stevens quit and Roosevelt then appointed a man who couldn’t quit, Colonel Washington Goethals </li></ul><ul><li>workmen came from Barbados but got paid well </li></ul><ul><li>more explosive power was used blasting through Panama than all the wars the U.S. had fought up till then </li></ul><ul><li>the massive amounts of rain made the mountains start to slide </li></ul>
  5. 5. Panama Canal <ul><li>locks were constructed in 36 foot sections </li></ul><ul><li>end to end, the locks were 1,000 feet long and 110 feet wide </li></ul><ul><li>in 1913, when the last concrete was being poured, whole towns were being taken apart like stage sets </li></ul><ul><li>the Canal would provide its own power </li></ul><ul><li>Panama became an attraction site for tourists </li></ul><ul><li>grand opening: August 15, 1914- finished ahead of schedule and it cost less than estimated </li></ul><ul><li>complete 50 mile crossing takes approximately 9 hours </li></ul><ul><li>Canal remains one of the busiest sea lanes in the world </li></ul><ul><li>as of January 1, 2000 the canal belongs to Panama </li></ul><ul><li>guaranteed to stay an open waterway to all nations </li></ul><ul><li>U.S. has the right to protect and defend that neutrality </li></ul>
  6. 6. Los Angeles Aquaduct <ul><li>Mulholland envisioned a city like Dublin which was where he grew up </li></ul><ul><li>Los Angeles never really had a reason to be there: no minerals, no metals or forests </li></ul><ul><li>also lacked water, had been an area of perpetual drought </li></ul><ul><li>1878- Mulholland arrived from Ireland </li></ul><ul><li>found work as a ditch digger in the towns delapitated water system </li></ul><ul><li>climbed the ranks and found himself superintendent of the LA water system </li></ul><ul><li>the huge growing city had sucked dry the tiny Los Angeles River, its only source of water </li></ul>
  7. 7. Los Angeles Aquaduct <ul><li>tried to make Los Angeles live within is means but growth sabotaged everything he did </li></ul><ul><li>knew the city would either have to stop growing or he would have to find a new source of water </li></ul><ul><li>was told of the Owens River which was 200 miles away </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mulholland set out there and was impressed by the valley and knew that water could sustain LA for the next century </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>became an empire builder- set out to move the whole river to Los Angeles </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>problem was that the farmers owned it- Mulholland quietly bought water rights so farmers wouldn’t fully know what was going on </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Los Angeles Aquaduct <ul><li>new river route would pass through San Fernando valley </li></ul><ul><li>after all the land was bought, the citizens then had to decide if they wanted to pay for the aqueduct to be built </li></ul><ul><li>voted 10:1 to pay for Mulholland’s river </li></ul><ul><li>with the law and the president on his side, he set out to build his aqueduct </li></ul><ul><li>Mulholland set out to engineering a project the world had never seen </li></ul>
  9. 9. Los Angeles Aqueduct <ul><li>took 5 years to build </li></ul><ul><li>struggles included: no water, extreme heat and cold </li></ul><ul><li>aqueduct carrie 4 times more water than Los Angeles could use </li></ul><ul><li>that water created the contemporary LA </li></ul><ul><li>aqueduct ended up irrigating San Fernando valley as well </li></ul><ul><li>L.A. was the most productive farm country in America </li></ul><ul><li>Mulholland became the highest paid public employee in Californa </li></ul>

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