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That’s nice,
dear.
An Overview of
Cyber-ethnography
by Kelli Buckreus
EDDE 802 | March 6, 2018
Athabasca University
When I...
(Gatson & Zweerink, 2004; Hine, 2017)
Classical Ethnography:
Immersions + Active Participation = Observation + Experience
Must ethnographers start from a distance?
(Gatson & Zweerink, 2004; Hine, 2015, 2017)
Early cyberethnograhpers
focussed on single online
spaces, making it easy to
bound field sites.
(Hine, 2017)
Towards multi-sited
ethnography
(Gatson&Zweerink,2004;Hine,2015,2017)
Blurred boundaries and fluid movement
between offline and online spaces
(Hallet & Barber, 2014; Hine, 2015, 2017;; Teli, P...
Ethnography of online groups?
Ethnography of groups online?
Is there a difference?
(Hine, 2015, 2017; Savin-Baden & Tombs,...
Hine,2017;Savin-Baden&Tombs,2017
Table 3.2 Forms of ethnography for the digital age
Savin-Baden & Tombs, 2017, p. 62
Savin-Baden & Tombs, 2017, p. 61
(Gatson and Zweerink, 2004; Hine, 2015, 2017)
Ethnographer establishes presences
in multiple sites within a system
Both subjects and researchers
create and simultaneously
manage multiple identities
(Gatson and Zweerink, 2004; Hine, 2015,...
Where do YOU engage online?
What identities do YOU create?
BE fashion!
Me, most of the time.
(Gatson and Zweerink, 2004)
?
(Gatson and Zweerink, 2004; Hallet & Barber, 2014; Savin-Baden & Tombs, 2017)
(Gatson & Zweerink, 2004; Savin-Baden & Tombs, 2017)
“… where in the offline world the ethnographer must translate the field site into field
notes or text, online members took...
Table 1.1 New typology of data
DATA TYPE DATA SOURCES RESEARCH CHALLENGES
Orthodox intentional data Interviews, surveys, f...
“… when [does] participant observation move
from being a description of being… to an
inscription of ethnography?”
(Gatson ...
Provocative Questions!(… none of which address our glam shots)
• What arguments are there fore or against the assertion th...
References
Gatson, S. N., & Zweerink, A. (2004). Ethnography online: ‘Natives’ practising and inscribing community. Qualit...
An Overview of Cyber-ethnography
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An Overview of Cyber-ethnography

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Slides from my seminar presentation on cyber-ethnography as a research methodology,

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An Overview of Cyber-ethnography

  1. 1. That’s nice, dear. An Overview of Cyber-ethnography by Kelli Buckreus EDDE 802 | March 6, 2018 Athabasca University When I grow up, I’m going to be a princess CYBER-ethnographer!
  2. 2. (Gatson & Zweerink, 2004; Hine, 2017) Classical Ethnography: Immersions + Active Participation = Observation + Experience
  3. 3. Must ethnographers start from a distance? (Gatson & Zweerink, 2004; Hine, 2015, 2017)
  4. 4. Early cyberethnograhpers focussed on single online spaces, making it easy to bound field sites. (Hine, 2017)
  5. 5. Towards multi-sited ethnography (Gatson&Zweerink,2004;Hine,2015,2017)
  6. 6. Blurred boundaries and fluid movement between offline and online spaces (Hallet & Barber, 2014; Hine, 2015, 2017;; Teli, Pisanu & Hakken, 2007,p. 29)
  7. 7. Ethnography of online groups? Ethnography of groups online? Is there a difference? (Hine, 2015, 2017; Savin-Baden & Tombs, 2017)
  8. 8. Hine,2017;Savin-Baden&Tombs,2017
  9. 9. Table 3.2 Forms of ethnography for the digital age Savin-Baden & Tombs, 2017, p. 62
  10. 10. Savin-Baden & Tombs, 2017, p. 61
  11. 11. (Gatson and Zweerink, 2004; Hine, 2015, 2017) Ethnographer establishes presences in multiple sites within a system
  12. 12. Both subjects and researchers create and simultaneously manage multiple identities (Gatson and Zweerink, 2004; Hine, 2015, 2017)
  13. 13. Where do YOU engage online? What identities do YOU create?
  14. 14. BE fashion!
  15. 15. Me, most of the time. (Gatson and Zweerink, 2004)
  16. 16. ? (Gatson and Zweerink, 2004; Hallet & Barber, 2014; Savin-Baden & Tombs, 2017)
  17. 17. (Gatson & Zweerink, 2004; Savin-Baden & Tombs, 2017)
  18. 18. “… where in the offline world the ethnographer must translate the field site into field notes or text, online members took on the ethnographer’s task by translating the offline range of interactive cuing mechanisms into textual format.” - (Robinson & Schults, as quoted in Savin-Baden & Tombs, 2017, p. 58)
  19. 19. Table 1.1 New typology of data DATA TYPE DATA SOURCES RESEARCH CHALLENGES Orthodox intentional data Interviews, surveys, focus groups, with explicit consent Difficult to determine what online data is “orthodox” Participative intentional data Participatory action research, appreciative inquiry, crowdsourcing Consent can be difficult in online settings. Consequential data Secondary data Incomplete datasets Self-published data Blogs, personal websites, used with or without permission Difficult to decide on sampling, and managing large datasets Social media data Twitter, Facebook, etc., used without permission, in public domain. Difficult to determine provenance, truthfulness/authenticity, and validity Data traces “Footprints” left behind, e.g. search histories, used without permission Difficult determining what might be an honest use of data in research Found data Public domain, e.g. observations in public spaces Covert data collection, therefore ethical issues. (Gatson & Zweerink, 2004; Savin-Baden & Tombs, 2017, p. 20)
  20. 20. “… when [does] participant observation move from being a description of being… to an inscription of ethnography?” (Gatson and Zweerink, 2004, p. 187)
  21. 21. Provocative Questions!(… none of which address our glam shots) • What arguments are there fore or against the assertion that ALL contemporary ethnography should be multi-site, and should include online field sites? • How might the idea of researcher as native enhance or undermine ethnography? (… considering Geertz’s experience-near and experience- distant for simultaneously interpreting local details and global structures) • How might an ethnographer’s (manipulated) digital identity or identities in online contexts shape research and interpretations that may be different in nature compared to research and interpretations involving the ethnographer’s in-person identity in wholly offline contexts? How access be impacted? How might authenticity be impacted?
  22. 22. References Gatson, S. N., & Zweerink, A. (2004). Ethnography online: ‘Natives’ practising and inscribing community. Qualitative Research, 4(2), 179-200. DOI: 10.1177/1468794104044431 Hallett, R. E., & Barber, K. (2014). Ethnographic research in a cyber era. Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, 43(3), 306-330. DOI: 10.1177/0891241613497749 Hine, C. (2017). Ethnography and the Internet: Taking account of emerging technological landscapes. Fudan Journal of the Humanities and Social Sciences, 10(3), 315-329. DOI 10.1007/s40647-017-0178-7 Hine, C. (2015). Ethnography for the internet: Embedded, embodied and everyday [Kindle version]. Retrieved from Amazon.ca Savin-Baden, M., & Falconer, L. (2016). Learning at the interstices; Locating practical philosophies for understanding physical/virtual inter-spaces. Interactive Learning Environments, 24(5), 991-1003. https://doi.org/10.1080/10494820.2015.1128212 Savin-Baden, M., & Tombs, G. (2017). Research methods for education in the digital age [Kindle version]. Retrieved from Amazon.ca Teli, M., Pisanu, F., & Hakken, D. (2007, September). The internet as a library-of-people: For a cyberethnography of online groups. Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung/Forum: Qualitative Social Research, 8(3), 1-24. http://dx.doi.org/10.17169/fqs-8.3.283

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