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CAD & Analysis Introduction

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CADEA overview and module introduction

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CAD & Analysis Introduction

  1. 1. Computer Aided Design Engineering & AnalysisBachelor of Engineering Mechanical Engineering 2012-13Bachelor of Engineering Manufacturing Technology 2012-13Lecture 1 - IntroductionKeith Vaugh BEng (AERO) MEng KEITH VAUGH
  2. 2. Aim The successful alignment and integrated implementation of all analytical and computational techniques resulting in a more streamlined engineering design/manufacturing process with reduced costs decreased development time and improved quality. KEITH VAUGH
  3. 3. Learningoutcomes Identify mathematical models for solution of common engineering problems and employ document-centric calculation environment to create complex, professional engineering design documents in a format that is presentable and understandable. - MATHCAD and/or MATHEMATICA Establish performance requirements, concept selection, iterating to the final design, and documenting the process and the results. - Design methodologies, DFM, DFA, DFE, FMEA etc.. Design mechanical components and assemblies to meet performance requirements through the usage of CAD & basic analysis tools.  KEITH VAUGH
  4. 4. Learningoutcomes Formulate, model and solve structural, thermal, fluid flow, non-linear material and modal problems in appropriate Finite Element solver typically Creo Simulate or ANSYS Utilize Rapid Prototyping, Tooling and Manufacturing processes and appreciate CAD Requirements in RP, Materials for Rapid Prototyping and Reverse Engineering Use computers as an engineering tool by: using a computer and its operating system, using appropriate applications i.e. excel for engineering problems, using engineering applications and given an engineering problem, solve and validate it using a computer application Participate and/or lead a design team. KEITH VAUGH
  5. 5. Modulegrading 15% MathCAD 15% CREO parametric 15% CREO simulate/ANSYS 15% Mini assignments/Rapid Prototyping 40% Final Team Project KEITH VAUGH
  6. 6. Modulegrading 15% MathCAD 15% CREO parametric 15% CREO simulate/ANSYS 15% Mini assignments/Rapid Prototyping 40% Final Team Project Note Work and assignments are assessed on evidence of engineering judgement, application of appropriate tools, interpretation and critique of design brief and design solution. KEITH VAUGH
  7. 7. How can we integratefragmented elements into a methodology which will satisfy both design and manufacturing? KEITH VAUGH
  8. 8. Industrial Design Vs. Engineering Design KEITH VAUGH
  9. 9. Dieter Rams:ten principles for good designBack in the late 1970s, Dieter Rams wasbecoming increasingly concerned by thestate of the world around him – “animpenetrable confusion of forms, coloursand noises.” Aware that he was asignificant contributor to that world, heasked himself an important question: ismy design good design?As good design cannot be measured in afinite way he set about expressing the tenmost important principles for what heconsidered was good design. (Sometimesthey are referred as the ‘Tencommandments’.) Vitsœ’s designer, Dieter Rams. Photograph by Abisag Tüllmann source: https://www.vitsoe.com/gb/about/good-design
  10. 10. Good design is The possibilities for innovation are not, by any means, exhausted. Technological innovative development is always offering new opportunities for innovative design. But innovative design always develops in tandem with innovative technology, and can never be an end in itself. TP 1 radio/phono combination, 1959, by Dieter Rams for Braunsource: https://www.vitsoe.com/gb/about/good-design KEITH VAUGH
  11. 11. Good design A product is bought to be used. It has to satisfy certain criteria, not only functional, makes a but also psychological and aesthetic. Good design emphasises the usefulness product useful of a product whilst disregarding anything that could possibly detract from it. MPZ 21 multipress citrus juicer, 1972, by Dieter Rams and Jürgen Greubel for Braunsource: https://www.vitsoe.com/gb/about/good-design KEITH VAUGH
  12. 12. Good design is The aesthetic quality of a product is integral to its usefulness because aesthetic products we use every day affect our person and our well-being. But only well- executed objects can be beautiful. RT 20 tischsuper radio, 1961, by Dieter Rams for Braunsource: https://www.vitsoe.com/gb/about/good-design KEITH VAUGH
  13. 13. Good design It clarifies the product’s structure. Better still, it can make the product talk. At best, makes a it is self-explanatory. product understandable T 1000 world receiver, 1963, by Dieter Rams for Braunsource: https://www.vitsoe.com/gb/about/good-design KEITH VAUGH
  14. 14. Good design is Products fulfilling a purpose are like tools. They are neither decorative objects nor unobtrusive works of art. Their design should therefore be both neutral and restrained, to leave room for the user’s self-expression. Cylindric T 2 lighter, 1968, by Dieter Rams for Braunsource: https://www.vitsoe.com/gb/about/good-design KEITH VAUGH
  15. 15. Good design is It does not make a product more innovative, powerful or valuable than it honest really is. It does not attempt to manipulate the consumer with promises that cannot be kept. L 450 flat loudspeaker, TG 60 reel-to- reel tape recorder and TS 45 control unit, 1962-64, by Dieter Rams for Braunsource: https://www.vitsoe.com/gb/about/good-design KEITH VAUGH
  16. 16. Good design is It avoids being fashionable and therefore never appears antiquated. Unlike long lasting fashionable design, it lasts many years – even in today’s throwaway society. 620 Chair Programme, 1962, by Dieter Rams for Vitsœsource: https://www.vitsoe.com/gb/about/good-design KEITH VAUGH
  17. 17. Good design is Design makes an important contribution to the preservation of the environment. It environmentally conserves resources and minimises physical and visual pollution throughout friendly the lifecycle of the product. 606 Universal Shelving System, 1960, by Dieter Rams for Vitsœsource: https://www.vitsoe.com/gb/about/good-design KEITH VAUGH
  18. 18. Good design is Less, but better – because it concentrates on the essential aspects, and the as little design products are not burdened with non- essentials. as possible Back to purity, back to simplicity. L 2 speaker, 1958, by Dieter Rams for Braunsource: https://www.vitsoe.com/gb/about/good-design KEITH VAUGH
  19. 19. “Imagination is more important thanknowledge, for knowledge is finitewhereas imagination is infinite” KEITH VAUGH
  20. 20. “Imagination is more important thanknowledge, for knowledge is finitewhereas imagination is infinite” Albert Einstein KEITH VAUGH
  21. 21. Adaptive Design KEITH VAUGH
  22. 22. KEITH VAUGH
  23. 23. KEITH VAUGH
  24. 24. KEITH VAUGH
  25. 25. KEITH VAUGH
  26. 26. KEITH VAUGH
  27. 27. Development Design KEITH VAUGH
  28. 28. KEITH VAUGH
  29. 29. Engineering Design Process KEITH VAUGH
  30. 30. Engineering Design Process What really is it? KEITH VAUGH
  31. 31. Johnson, 1978 Dym, 1994 Pahl & Beitz, 1996
  32. 32. KEITH VAUGH
  33. 33. Selection & specification of materialsDetermination of dimensions & tolerancesDefinition of product appearanceselection of performance standards KEITH VAUGH
  34. 34. “the systematic, intelligent generation andevaluation of specifications for artifactswhose form and function achieve statedobjectives and satisfy specifiedconstraints” Dym KEITH VAUGH
  35. 35. Accreditation “ engineering design is theBoard for process of devising a system,Engineeringand component, or process to meetTechnology desired needs. it is a decision-(ABET) making process (often-iterative), in which the basic sciences, mathematics, and engineering sciences are applied to convert resources optimally to meet a stated objective” KEITH VAUGH
  36. 36. Effective Design Process KEITH VAUGH
  37. 37. Effective Design ProcessMatches product characteristics with customer needs KEITH VAUGH
  38. 38. Effective Design ProcessMeets customer requirements in simplest & most cost effective manner KEITH VAUGH
  39. 39. Effective Design ProcessReduces time required to get the product from concept to the customer KEITH VAUGH
  40. 40. Effective Design Process Minimizes revisions KEITH VAUGH
  41. 41. Design Engineers Roll KEITH VAUGH
  42. 42. Design Engineers RollNo longer totally responsible for product design KEITH VAUGH
  43. 43. Design Engineers RollResponsible for more than what was traditionally considered “Design” KEITH VAUGH
  44. 44. Design Engineers RollMerging of design & manufacturing engineer’s has occurred KEITH VAUGH
  45. 45. Design Engineers RollKnowledge of limitations imposed by manufacturing technologies is now required KEITH VAUGH
  46. 46. Traditional Design Process
  47. 47. Design
  48. 48. Design Verify
  49. 49. Design EngineeringDesign Verify Prototype
  50. 50. Manufacturing, Test, Quality, Design Engineering ServiceDesign Verify Prototype Review
  51. 51. For manufacturingFor testFor qualityFor service Redesign
  52. 52. For manufacturingFor testFor qualityFor service Redesign Reverify
  53. 53. For manufacturingFor testFor qualityFor service Redesign Reverify Produce
  54. 54. For manufacturingFor testFor qualityFor service Redesign Reverify Produce Test
  55. 55. For manufacturingFor test Manufacturing,For quality Test, Quality,For service Design Engineering Service Redesign Design Reverify Verify Prototype Produce Review Test
  56. 56. For manufacturing Manufacturing, For test Test, Quality, For quality Design Engineering Service For service FinishStart Design Verify Prototype Review Redesign Reverify Produce Test Time to market
  57. 57. For manufacturing Manufacturing, For test Test, Quality, For quality Design Engineering Service For service FinishStart Design Verify Prototype Review Redesign Reverify Produce Test Time to market Very wasteful - time, money, resources etc...
  58. 58. For manufacturing Manufacturing, For test Test, Quality, For quality Design Engineering Service For service FinishStart Design Verify Prototype Review Redesign Reverify Produce Test Time to market Very wasteful - time, money, resources etc... Competition getting to market first
  59. 59. For manufacturing Manufacturing, For test Test, Quality, For quality Design Engineering Service For service FinishStart Design Verify Prototype Review Redesign Reverify Produce Test Time to market Very wasteful - time, money, resources etc... Competition getting to market first Very little variety in products
  60. 60. For manufacturing Manufacturing, For test Test, Quality, For quality Design Engineering Service For service FinishStart Design Verify Prototype Review Redesign Reverify Produce Test Time to market Very wasteful - time, money, resources etc... Competition getting to market first Very little variety in products Result’s in product failures
  61. 61. Concept Test Prototype
  62. 62. Iterative loopConcept Test Prototype
  63. 63. Iterative loop Process Des.Concept Test Prototype
  64. 64. Iterative loop Process Des.Concept Test Implement Prototype
  65. 65. Design Verify Review Produce Test
  66. 66. Performance Testability ManufacturabilityDesign Verify Review Produce Test Service Cost Quality
  67. 67. Quality Planning Data management Customer Needs & communications Assembly Purchasing Engineering DesignManufacturing Cost Accounting Processes Marketing and Material Control Sales Material Handling
  68. 68. Quality Planning Data management Customer Needs & communications Assembly Purchasing Engineering DesignManufacturing Cost Accounting Processes Marketing and Material Control Sales Material Handling
  69. 69. Conceptual Detail design & Manufacturing Distribution, service & Design prototype disposal Product Development Cycle Singh, N., 1996, “Systems approach to computer-integrated design and manufacture” John Wiley and Sons, Inc., Ch.4, pp 106 - 108
  70. 70. Conceptual Detail design & Manufacturing Distribution, service & Design prototype disposal Product Development Cycle Singh, N., 1996, “Systems approach to computer-integrated design and manufacture” John Wiley and Sons, Inc., Ch.4, pp 106 - 108
  71. 71. Conceptual Detail design & Manufacturing Distribution, service & Design prototype disposal Product Development Cycle Singh, N., 1996, “Systems approach to computer-integrated design and manufacture” John Wiley and Sons, Inc., Ch.4, pp 106 - 108
  72. 72. 100 80Total cost (percent) 60 40 20 0 Conceptual Detail design & Manufacturing Distribution, service & Design prototype disposal Product Development Cycle Singh, N., 1996, “Systems approach to computer-integrated design and manufacture” John Wiley and Sons, Inc., Ch.4, pp 106 - 108
  73. 73. 100 80Total cost (percent) 60 Cost incurred 40 20 0 Conceptual Detail design & Manufacturing Distribution, service & Design prototype disposal Product Development Cycle Singh, N., 1996, “Systems approach to computer-integrated design and manufacture” John Wiley and Sons, Inc., Ch.4, pp 106 - 108
  74. 74. 100 Life cycle cost committed 80Total cost (percent) 60 Cost incurred 40 20 0 Conceptual Detail design & Manufacturing Distribution, service & Design prototype disposal Product Development Cycle Singh, N., 1996, “Systems approach to computer-integrated design and manufacture” John Wiley and Sons, Inc., Ch.4, pp 106 - 108
  75. 75. 100 Life cycle cost committed 80Total cost (percent) 60 Cost incurred 40 20 Ease of change 0 Conceptual Detail design & Manufacturing Distribution, service & Design prototype disposal Product Development Cycle Singh, N., 1996, “Systems approach to computer-integrated design and manufacture” John Wiley and Sons, Inc., Ch.4, pp 106 - 108
  76. 76. 100 Life cycle cost committed 80Total cost (percent) 60 Cost incurred 40 20 Ease of change 0 Conceptual Detail design & Manufacturing Distribution, service & Design prototype disposal Product Development Cycle Singh, N., 1996, “Systems approach to computer-integrated design and manufacture” John Wiley and Sons, Inc., Ch.4, pp 106 - 108
  77. 77. 100 Life cycle cost committed 80Total cost (percent) 60 Cost incurred 40 20 Ease of change 0 Conceptual Detail design & Manufacturing Distribution, service & Design prototype disposal Product Development Cycle Singh, N., 1996, “Systems approach to computer-integrated design and manufacture” John Wiley and Sons, Inc., Ch.4, pp 106 - 108
  78. 78. 100 Life cycle cost committed 80Total cost (percent) 60 Cost incurred 40 20 Ease of change 0 Conceptual Detail design & Manufacturing Distribution, service & Design prototype disposal Product Development Cycle Singh, N., 1996, “Systems approach to computer-integrated design and manufacture” John Wiley and Sons, Inc., Ch.4, pp 106 - 108
  79. 79. Industrial Trend
  80. 80. Industrial Trend DFM CAD FEA RP RT Total1992 1 4 5 3 2 1202002 1 7 5 8 10 28002012 3 4 5 11 22 14520
  81. 81. Industrial Trend DFM CAD FEA RP RT Total1992 1 4 5 3 2 1202002 1 7 5 8 10 28002012 3 4 5 11 22 14520
  82. 82. Industrial Trend DFM CAD FEA RP RT Total1992 1 4 5 3 2 1202002 1 7 5 8 10 28002012 3 4 5 11 22 14520
  83. 83. Industrial Trend DFM CAD FEA RP RT Total1992 1 4 5 3 2 1202002 1 7 5 8 10 28002012 3 4 5 11 22 14520

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