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Step Into Security Webinar - Physical Security Integration & Access Control - Part Two - Software & Best Practices

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In LENSEC’s Step Into Security webinar, we take a look at integrations for physical security with a special focus on access control. We had so much good material last month that we couldn't cover it all. Part two will cover access control software and best practices. In part one we covered access control concepts and components. You can find that recording in our Step Into Security webinar archive:
http://www.lensec.com/webinar/webinar_videoarchive.html
http://bit.ly/StepIntoSecurityWebinarArchive
Recently, access control has made big strides in technology incorporating biometrics, integrating with other security products, and moving to a digital deployment among other things. We'll provide an overview for end-users and security personnel.
LENSEC physical security expert Keith Harris will be presenting this topic. Keith is a veteran expert with extensive knowledge of security equipment. Keith has experience working with educators, law enforcement and others developing security solutions to meet their needs.
Please register for the upcoming webinar. Share this info with your colleagues and invite them to join us.
WEBINAR AGENDA:
• Access Control Management Software
• Unifying Physical Security Platforms
• Best Practices
• New Access Control Technology

Step Into Security Webinar Archive:
http://bit.ly/StepIntoSecurityWebinarArchive

Published in: Devices & Hardware
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Step Into Security Webinar - Physical Security Integration & Access Control - Part Two - Software & Best Practices

  1. 1. Physical Security Integration & Access Control --- Part 2: Software & Best Practices
  2. 2. Keith Harris Marketing Manager LENSEC Today’s Panelist Expertise in Photography & Video Production Experience in Physical Security Market Trainer for Surveillance & Physical Security Techniques
  3. 3. Webinar Sponsor Based in Houston, TX Since 1998 IP Video Management System Design Installation Project Management LENSEC is committed to empowering our clients and partners to prevent or mitigate physical security risks. We want to help protect people and assets as well as improve operations through our evolutionary and intuitive technology. We can do this by providing expertise in security and software development. Our Mission
  4. 4. Webinar Logistics Q&A at the end Questions for the panelist Audio from attendees muted Poll questions Survey LENSEC Step Into Security Webinar Archive: http://bit.ly/SISarchive
  5. 5. Training Goal Physical Security Integration & Access Control Part 2: Software & Best Practices Topics for Webinar: Access Control Management Software Unifying Physical Security Platforms Best Practices Reviewing Components LENSEC Step Into Security Webinar Archive: http://bit.ly/SISarchive
  6. 6. Elements Live View Interface Current Status Door Management Device Configuration Rules/Schedules Cardholder Management Reporting Access Control Management Software Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  7. 7. Live View Interface Door Event Alarm Event Lock/Unlock Controls Access Control Management Software Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  8. 8. Poll Question Poll Question #1 Access control rules apply to…
  9. 9. Door Management Device Configuration Rules/Schedules Access Control Management Software Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  10. 10. Scheduling After Hours Access Weekend Access Holiday Schedules Access Control Management Software Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  11. 11. Cardholder Management Groups/Roles Privileges/Permissions Users/Credentials Access Control Management Software Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  12. 12. Reporting Access Control Management Software Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  13. 13. Access Control Levels Flat Configuration Operational Vulnerabilities Access Control Best Practices Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  14. 14. Access Control Levels Advanced Configuration System Segregation Accountability Escortability Physical Security Integration & Access Control Access Control Best Practices
  15. 15. Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  16. 16. Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  17. 17. Multi-site Management Enterprise Access Control Systems Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  18. 18. Enterprise Features Third Party Integration Payroll Visitor Management Accounting Systems SQL Database Single Sign On Active Directory/LDAP Enterprise Access Control Systems Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  19. 19. Integrating Physical Security Platforms Security Footprint Building Safety Systems Unifying Physical Security Platforms Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  20. 20. Video Verification Access Control Management Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  21. 21. Visitor Management Time & Attendance Integrating Physical Security Systems Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  22. 22. Poll Question Poll Question #2 What is mustering?
  23. 23. Mustering Anti-Passback Access Control Methods Preventing Door Propping Management & Policies Access Control Best Practices Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  24. 24. Mustering Did Everyone Make It Out? Area Tracking Checking In Access Control Best Practices Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  25. 25. Anti-Passback Controls Time Limit Reader Pattern & Flow Access Control Best Practices Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  26. 26. Tailgating/Piggybacking Detectors Hold Open Alarms Turnstiles & Revolving Doors Mantraps/Airlocks IP Camera Video Analytics Special Use Access Control Elevators Sallyports Access Control Best Practices Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  27. 27. Door Propping Convenience vs. Security Access Control Best Practices Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  28. 28. Human Resources Employment Status Change Security Report Out Collecting Credentials Access Control Best Practices Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  29. 29. Card Holder Database Operational Response Database Performance Reuse of Credentials Access Control Management – Best Practices Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  30. 30. Rules & Standards Fail Safe/Fail Secure Choosing Locks Exit Devices Credentials Card Readers Door Controllers Authorization Interface Access Control Review – Components & Concepts Physical Security Integration & Access Control Step Into Security Webinar – Physical Security Integration & Access Control – Part One: Concepts & Components - http://bit.ly/SIS5-16
  31. 31. Building & Fire Codes NFPA – National Fire Protection Association AHJ Rules & Standards Review Physical Security Integration & Access Control National Fire Protection Assoc. Codes & Standards: http://www.nfpa.org/codes-and-standards/document-information-pages International Building Code: http://www.iccsafe.org/codes-tech-support/codes/2015-i-codes/ibc/
  32. 32. Poll Question Poll Question #3 True or False: Most doors default to Fail Safe if you don’t have direction from the specifications or AHJ.
  33. 33. Access Control Concepts Review Physical Security Integration & Access Control Fail Safe – Locks are Released Fail Secure – Locks are Secured Applies to Entry Control Only Manual Egress Allowed
  34. 34. Choosing Locks Access Control Components Review Physical Security Integration & Access Control Cylindrical Lock Mortise Lock Surface Lock Deadbolt Lock Deadlatch Lock Maglock Door Strike Electronic Lockset
  35. 35. Exit Devices Request To Exit Crash Bar PIR-RTE Push Button Access Control Components Review Physical Security Integration & Access Control Crash Bar PRI-RTE Push Button RTE
  36. 36. Credentials Card Reader Door Controller Access Control Server Access Control Components Review Physical Security Integration & Access Control Keyfob Badge Clamshell
  37. 37. Authorization Factors Multifactor Credentials Possession: Something You Have Knowledge: Something You Know Characteristic: Something You Are Trusted Verification: Someone Trusted Verifies You Access Control Concepts Review Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  38. 38. Authorization Interface Keypad Biometrics Retinal/Iris Scan Fingerprint Access Control Components Review Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  39. 39. Fingerprint Theft Liveness Detection Solutions Tissue Reflection Heartbeat Detection Dermal Electric Resistance Unnatural Analysis The Future of Access Control Technology Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  40. 40. Near Field Communication (NFC) Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) The Future of Access Control Technology Physical Security Integration & Access Control Near Field Communication
  41. 41. Questions Q&A
  42. 42. Contacts Keith Harris LENSEC (512) 913-3907 kharris@lensec.com
  43. 43. Thanks for Attending Today’s Webinar
  44. 44. SIS7-16 Webinar – Physical Security Integration & Access Control Part Two: Software & Best Practices Questions & Answers Poll Question #1 Access control rules apply to… 1. Doors 2. Users 3. Doors or Users, depending on the access control system 4. Neither 5. I don’t know Poll Question #2 What is mustering? 1. Something you put on a sandwich 2. A technique for testing a server before deployment 3. Assembling the troops during inspection or events 4. Process for cutting into a door to install a mortise strike 5. I don’t know Poll Question #3 True or False: Most doors default to Fail Safe if you don’t have direction from the specifications or the AHJ. 1) True 2) False What is Ingress & Egress? This is a topic I covered last month in Part One. Ingress is traffic that is flowing into the building. This is the most common place for an authorization point – building entrances. Egress is traffic that is flowing out of the building. Sometimes in higher security settings, authorization is logged at the egress point of a building as well.
  45. 45. When you are evaluating an RFP to decide if you should pursue an access control project, are there certain things to keep in mind? Where should I begin? That could be a whole webinar in itself. Request For Proposals are notoriously vague and usually don’t give you all the answers to the questions. That’s where the building code and conversations with the AHJ come in. But you may not do that research until much later after you win the project. The typical RFP usually does a great job lining out the contractual language from the agency or owner’s point of view. But, the contractor typically has to make a lot of educated guesses when they are preparing the project for bid. Cover your bases and ask lots of questions. If you have a chance to go on a site visit – go. It will be well worth your time to walk the installation site. Get a picture in your mind about the entire scope of work and how that affects your part of the project. Go and actually see the door openings, if it isn’t new construction. A picture is literally worth a thousand words in this. The contracting agency or owner will hold you to the contract in spite of the lack of details in the RFP. You, as the contractor, should assume that you have your bases covered if you choose to enter into the contract with the owner. There are a lot of things to consider when planning an access control project. How do I make sure all my bases are covered? I recommend not tackling installation on your own as an amateur. There are just some things that require skill to accomplish. For example, if you’ve never cut into a door before to install a mortise strike, you might consider whether you would want to buy a replacement door or just hire the right guy with the right certification to do the job right the first time. If you plan to do many of these, you may want to get trained and certified as an installer. There are several places you can receive certification. Some are general certifications, such as those presented by security industry associations. And, others are presented by manufacturers including details about their product. I also recommend doing a lot of research on your own. Tackling a large scope project will require a lot of forethought and planning to make sure your bases are covered. We’ll present a webinar in July that addresses that topic. We’re covering Planning Security Technology Upgrades in next month’s Step Into Security Webinar. When we follow up, we’ll provide more details and a link so you can register for that free security training event. What is the difference between an access control panel and an IP based or server based access control system? Well, we didn’t get to much into that in our presentation due to lack of time to address all topics. Some access systems have no server. The system controllers or panels contain the hardware for administering the system. Under these circumstances, no external server is needed. You will find this more common in small or highly dispersed access systems.
  46. 46. An example of this is the Axis Entry Manager that is available for Axis security systems. This solution is not a full-featured enterprise system. It is only designed to control up to 66 doors and misses out on several ‘nice-to-have’ features – such as no Live View and no Reporting. Why are fire doors fail secure? It’s critical for fire doors to stay closed during a fire. The fire door provides structural barriers to prevent a fire from spreading throughout a building. This is a life safety issue. While it may not make sense to lock a door during a fire, keep in mind these are ingress or interior doors and not emergency exits. Emergency exits MUST allow egress at all times. Again, when we are saying Fail Secure, this means the door locks when power fails. At any rate, careful planning is required. If you have more questions about Fail Safe or Fail Secure, you should take a look at Part One of this webinar series. We cover the topic extensively. What is a delayed egress door? A Delayed Egress Door is also referred to as a “Nanny” Door. These are systems that temporarily lock inhabitants in. They are uses sometimes in nursing facilities or psychiatric wards in hospitals. These doors are subject to special authority. The will probably be governed by code. The code will cover specifics like how long to delay period can be – 15 to 30 seconds is common. They may even sound an alarm before opening.

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