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m i d t o w n a n c h o r coalition
framework plan
fall 2016
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butler university
butler-tarkington neighborhood association
christian theological seminary
citizens energy group...
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The authors would like to acknowledge the valuable effort and expertise of the following individuals who
...
MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION
FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 1
executive summary
Anchor institutions have a significant stake in the hea...
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The aerial photograph illustrates the signif...
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G U I D I N G P R I N C I P L E S & F U T ...
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butler university crown hill cemetery
butler-tarkingtion
neighborhood ass...
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One of the most direct ways for anchor institutions to engage the communit...
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12+88+T12%
12% of Midtown Anchor Coalition
employees live in zip codes 46...
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tarkington park9
indy connect purple line11
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indiana farm...
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midtown
The Midtown Anchor Coalition exists as a small part of what is ge...
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hinkle fieldhouse howard l. schrott center for the arts
schwitzer hall re...
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MIXED USE PARKING GARAGE
JULY 23, 2014
Kessler Boulevard
38th Street
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completed / in-progress
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community cafe
courtyard renov...
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42nd Street
30th Street
ClarendonAvenue
HaughleyAvenue
KnolltonRoad
Dr.M...
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virginia b. fairbanks art & nature park:
100 acres
michigan road pedestri...
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30th Street
HaughleyAvenue
KnolltonRoad
Dr.MartinLutherKingJr.Street
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gothic chapel renovations1
u.s. veteran’s columbarium
clarendon road phas...
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38th Street
36th Street
37th Street
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completed / in-progress
planned / proposed
elementary school addition
cro...
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KnolltonRoad
MichiganRoad
Interstate 65
international scho...
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framework plan
The following framework plan is intended to serve as a gu...
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MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING
This Memorandum Of Understanding, by and betw...
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The Midtown Anchor Coalition began with an initial meeting, hosted by Bu...
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Go To SAVI.org
Burglaries 2014
Midtown Anchor Coalition
Map Created: 7/21...
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Go To SAVI.org
Aggravated Assault in 2014
Midtown Anchor Coalition Censu...
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CRIME PREVENTION THROUGH ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
Overgrown and unkept parkwa...
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CRIME PREVENTION THROUGH ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
cpted design principles
na...
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FOSTER A CONSISTENTLY SAFE & SECURE
EXPERIENCE FOR RESIDENTS, EMPLOYEES, ...
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OBJECTIVE:
ADDRESS THE REAL AND PERCEIVED INCIDENCES OF CRIME IN THE ARE...
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BUTLER LAB SCHOOL
INDIANAPOLIS MUSEUM OF ART
preschool
INTERNATIONAL SCHO...
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education
ACCESS TO EXCELLENCE
In a 2012 survey conducted by the Metro I...
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LEVERAGE THE UNIQUE PK-16 AND ADULT
EDUCATIONAL ASSETS OF MIDTOWN AS A
QU...
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PROMOTE COLLECTIVELY THE UNIQUE OPTIONS OF HIGH-PERFORMING PRIVATE, PARO...
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View of the scenic Central Canal Towpath cutting through the Indianapolis...
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attraction & identity
ENVIRONMENT & NATURE
Listed on the National Regist...
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Interior view of Butler’s Irwin Library, designed by renowned architect M...
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Through the generous financial support of J. Irwin Miller, Chairman of t...
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PROVIDE UNIQUE AND AUTHENTIC URBAN EXPERIENCES FOR
ARTS, CULTURE, HISTORY...
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ADVOCATE AND ENFORCE A STANDARD OF HIGH QUALITY DESIGN FOR THE AREA TO E...
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Crown HIll Cemetery hosts the annual Beyond the Badge 5K Run and Walk, a ...
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MIDTOWN
I N D I A N A P O L I S
L O V E S
LO C A L
There is a symbiotic ...
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Movie nights at the IMA represent a new commitment to community-based pro...
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EVENTS & PROGRAMMING
collaboration & engagement
Located in the heart of ...
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BUILD AND STRENGTHEN THE MIDTOWN AND INDIANAPOLIS
COMMUNITIES THROUGH INT...
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SUPPORT EXISTING MISSION-ALIGNED PROGRAMS AND EVENTS BETWEEN ANCHOR INST...
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HOUSING & NEIGHBORHOOD
housing & neighborhood
MAINTAIN + ENHANCE:
NEIGHB...
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RENEW INDIANAPOLIS				0 PARCELS - 0% OF TOTAL
VACANT HOMES/PROPERTY			 86...
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CHARACTER IMAGES
HOUSING STUDY AREA 1
MAINTAIN & ENHANCE
RECOMMENDED STR...
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RENEW INDIANAPOLIS				0 PARCELS - 0.0% OF TOTAL
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PARTNER & PROMOTE
RECOMMENDED STRATEGY:
Observation & Analysis:
HOUSING ...
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RENEW INDIANAPOLIS				71 PARCELS - 3.9% OF TOTAL
VACANT HOMES/PROPERTY			...
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CHARACTER IMAGES
RESTORE & REVITALIZE
RECOMMENDED STRATEGY:
Observation ...
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STABILIZE & ENHANCE RESIDENTIAL AREAS
WITHIN THE BUTLER-TARKINGTON AND CR...
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BUILD ON AND SUPPORT THE MOMENTUM AT 38TH
STREET AND ILLINOIS STREET BY ...
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the michigan road corridor presents an
opportunity to establish a gateway...
Midtown Anchor Coalition Plan
Midtown Anchor Coalition Plan
Midtown Anchor Coalition Plan
Midtown Anchor Coalition Plan
Midtown Anchor Coalition Plan
Midtown Anchor Coalition Plan
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Midtown Anchor Coalition Plan

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Midtown Anchor Coalition Plan

  1. 1. m i d t o w n a n c h o r coalition framework plan fall 2016
  2. 2. 65 465 74 69 70 465 465 465 70 65 86TH ST 71ST ST 56TH ST 38TH ST 16TH ST MICHIGANST 10TH ST WASHINGTONST MICHIGANRD KEYSTONEAVE COLLEGEAVE MERIDIANST BINFORDBLVD MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION MIDTOWN INDIANAPOLIS DOWNTOWN - MILE SQUARE Marion County Context Map
  3. 3. 106TH ST butler university butler-tarkington neighborhood association christian theological seminary citizens energy group crown hill heritage foundation indianapolis museum of art international school of indiana midtown indianapolis, inc PREPARED FOR: 1 3 21 executive summary midtown anchor coalition role of an anchor midtown anchor coalition members framework plan safety & security education attraction & Identity collaboration & engagement housing & neighborhood connectivity & infrastructure 212 west tenth street, suite a-355 indianapolis, in 46202 1 north meridian street, suite 902 indianapolis, in 46204 PREPARED BY:
  4. 4. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors would like to acknowledge the valuable effort and expertise of the following individuals who helped make this plan possible. JAN DIGGINS, CITIZENS ENERGY GROUP JIM EWING, INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF INDIANA TED FEENEY, BUTLER-TARKINGTON NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION DAVID GARNER, INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF INDIANA LAURA GRANIERI, MIDTOWN INDIANAPOLIS, INC. BENJAMIN HUNTER, BUTLER UNIVERSITY VERITY JONES, CHRISTIAN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY MICHAEL KALTENMARK, BUTLER UNIVERSITY ALISON KOTHE, CHRISTIAN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY MICHAEL McKILLIP, MIDTOWN INDIANAPOLIS, INC. MO McREYNOLDS, INDIANAPOLIS MUSEUM OF ART RICHARD MICHAL, BUTLER UNIVERSITY MATT MINDRUM, BUTLER UNIVERSITY CHRIS MOREHEAD, INDIANAPOLIS MUSEUM OF ART KEITH NORWALK, CROWN HILL HERITAGE FOUNDATION JENNIFER SMITH, BUTLER UNIVERSITY CHARLES VENABLE, INDIANAPOLIS MUSEUM OF ART JERRY WISE, INDIANAPOLIS MUSEUM OF ART
  5. 5. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 1 executive summary Anchor institutions have a significant stake in the health of their surrounding neighborhoods. Given the scale and scope of their operations, they also have the resources to make a difference. Anchors can include universities, hospitals, schools, museums, libraries, cemeteries, performing arts facilities, locally-focused philanthropies, faith-based institutions, military installations, and, in some cases large corporations. For- profit businesses such as financial institutions, media companies, utilities, pharmaceutical and technology companies, and sports franchises can also serve as anchors in their community. A defining characteristic, however, is the locally-serving nature of non-profits such as hospitals, universities, or museums which means that jobs are not subject to corporate relocation. They are place-based, having significant ties to a geographic location. Anchors earn their name by reason of mission, capital investment, history, and/or long-standing relationships to their community. Economic trends related to globalization, such as the decline of the traditional manufacturing base and the rise of the service sector, has led to the growing importance of anchor institutions to local economies. Anchor institutions, such as hospitals, colleges, universities, and cultural institutions are now the largest employers in 66 of the top 100 inner cities, including Indianapolis. As cities like Cleveland, Cincinnati, Baltimore, and Detroit have found, the economic engine of anchor institutions can be more effectively leveraged, contributing to the community in new and significant ways. It is with this in mind that six of Indianapolis’ oldest and most important anchor institutions, with their community partners, have formed the Midtown Anchor Coalition: Butler University, Butler-Tarkington Neighborhood Association, Christian Theological Seminary, Citizens Energy Group, Crown Hill Heritage Foundation, Indianapolis Museum of Art, International School of Indiana, and Midtown Indianapolis, Inc. Together, these organizations employ over 2,000 people, own 1,100 acres of land and over three million square feet of facilities, spend over $117 million annually on goods and services, and attract 1.1 million visitors annually. While they share a common geography northwest of downtown Indianapolis, more importantly, this Coalition shares a commitment to enhancing the collective assets of Midtown as a premier destination to live, work, visit, and learn in the Central Indiana Region. Over nine months, the Midtown Anchor Coalition has shared strategic plans and operations data to understand the goals and objectives of each anchor institution, identified areas of alignment, and built consensus for priority projects and initiatives. The result is a framework plan and implementation strategy to optimize long- term investment and shared value between the anchor institutions, the City of Indianapolis and the Central Indiana region. The six areas of strategic focus are: Safety and Security; Education; Attraction and Identity; Collaboration and Engagement; Housing and Neighborhood; Connectivity and Infrastructure. Perhaps more important, the process has resulted in the renewal and building of key relationships among the leaders of the community and the anchor institutions which will ensure that the collective and individual missions of these community anchors are realized.
  6. 6. I- 65 Meridian Street White River Dr Martin Luther King Jr Boulevard
  7. 7. midtown anchor coalition 38th Street 4 2nd Street M ich ig a n R o a d NO RTH The aerial photograph illustrates the significance of the land holdings of the Midtown Anchor Coalition. More important, however, is the unique character of urban open space and the natural environment that is one of Indianapolis’ greatest assets.
  8. 8. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 20164 MIDTOWN I N D I A N A P O L I S G U I D I N G P R I N C I P L E S & F U T U R E D E V E L O P M E N T S T R A T E G I E S A Working Planning Document Commissioned by: Midtown Indianapolis, Inc. UPDATED SUMMER of 2013 NORTHMERIDIANSTREET 38TH STREET (MAPLE ROAD) White River Fall Creek ANCHOR INSTITUTIONS PLAY AN IMPORTANT ROLE IN A CITY. THEIR EMPLOYMENT, REAL ESTATE HOLDINGS, REVENUE GENERATION, AND SPENDING PATTERNS SIGNIFICANTLY IMPACT LOCAL AND REGIONAL ECONOMIES. MIDTOWN I N D I A N A P O L I S G U I D I N G P R I N C I P L E S & F U T U R E D E V E L O P M E N T S T R A T E G I E S A Working Planning Document Commissioned by: Midtown Indianapolis, Inc. UPDATED SUMMER of 2013 NORTHMERIDIANSTREET 38TH STREET (MAPLE ROAD) White River Fall Creek LAND AREA: FACILITIES: EMPLOYEES: SPENDING: PAYROLL: STUDENTS: VISITORS: 1,097 ACRES 3 MILLION+ SQUARE FEET 2,312 $114 MILLION IN ANNUAL PURCHASING $117 MILLION IN TOTAL PAYROLL 5,103 1.1 MILLION+ ANNUALLY COLLECTIVE IMPACT OF MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION IN THE PAST FIVE YEARS, THE MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION INSTITUTIONS HAVE INVESTED OVER $84 MILLION IN MIDTOWN, WITH PLANS FOR AN ADDITIONAL $219 MILLION OVER THE NEXT 10 YEARS.
  9. 9. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 5 butler university crown hill cemetery butler-tarkingtion neighborhood association (btna) indianapolis museum of art (ima) christian theological seminary (cts) international school of indiana (isi) citizens energy group (central canal towpath) midtown indianapolis 1 1 5 5 2 2 6 6 3 3 7 7 4 4 8 8 38TH STREET ILLINOISSTREET I-65 MICHIGANROAD CEN TRALCAN AL Midtown anchor coalition
  10. 10. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 20166 One of the most direct ways for anchor institutions to engage the community is through their core business, providing essential products and services. Educational, heritage, and cultural programming are essential pieces for a city and its citizens, and can act as a fulcrum for community revitalization. Midtown Anchors SERVED OVER 5,000 STUDENTS from Pre-K to doctoral in 2014. Midtown Anchors ATTRACTED 1.1 MILLION VISITORS last year. To create shared value, ANCHORS CAN EXTEND PROGRAMS TARGETED AT INCREASING SPENDING with XBEs – minority, woman, veteran-owned business enterprises – to include locally based suppliers. Anchor institutions can help local firms compete by unbundling large contracts or requiring prime contractors to use local subcontractors. They can also encourage local firms to partner with each other or with larger vendors and can provide business advice and mentorship. GOO D S & SERVICES SERVICE PROVID ER LAND U SE COMMUNITY DEVELOPER INFRASTRUCTURE WORKFORCE DRIVER O F PURC H A SER OF MAJOREMPLOYER BUILDER C LU STER ANCHOR COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC VITALITY™ Source: Initiative for a Competitive Inner City SERVICE PROVIDER PURCHASER OF GOODS & SERVICES Developed by the Initiative for a Competitive Inner City, the seven roles of anchor institutions provide a strategic framework to understand assets, impact, and opportunities. The seven roles are: service provider, community infrastructure builder, purchaser of goods and services, workforce developer, driver of land use, cluster anchor, and major employer. Each role can be an opportunity for creating shared value between the institution and the community. Further, initiatives in several roles can have a multiplier effect, where one role can reinforce impact in others. The framework serves as a foundation for leveraging anchor institutions in the pursuit of community and economic vitality. 85+15+T85% 85% of CTS and ISI students live outside zip codes 46228 and 46208*, while most Butler students live on-campus. Communities look to anchor institutions to provide resources and expertise because of their mission and history. This can take the form of community service and education, quality of life planning, civic leadership, cash and in-kind contributions, and financial assistance. In the strategic framework, all of the other roles also HELP TO BUILD THE COMMUNITY’S CAPACITY TO IMPROVE ITS ECONOMIC, SOCIAL, AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY. Beyond philanthropy, the role of community infrastructure builder is based on anchors using community engagement or relationships in a strategic and coordinated manner, to both advance the initiatives in the other roles and use each anchor’s particular competencies to address any other priorities of the community. As a community infrastructure builder, an anchor should choose those areas of community need where it has competencies to offer and where its efforts will best complement its other work across the framework. Every organization in the Midtown Anchor Coalition devotes significant effort to community leadership, whether through Reconnecting to Our Waterways, hosting a preschool in an art museum, tutoring local school children, devoting over 100,000 community service hours per year, raising hundreds of thousands in charitable contributions, or just organizing block parties and street clean-ups. The Midtown Anchor Coalition is already making a meaningful impact. COMMUNITY INFRASTRUCTURE BUILDER role of an anchor institution 6+94+T6% 6 % of annual goods and service spending ($6.7 million) occurs in zip codes 46228 - 46208*
  11. 11. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 7 12+88+T12% 12% of Midtown Anchor Coalition employees live in zip codes 46228 and 46208* Colleges, universities, and hospitals are often the dominant employers in a city and provide a stabilizing force to the local economy because of their longevity and relatively recession-proof businesses. In the Midtown Anchor Coalition, anchor institutions PROVIDE 2,312 JOBS. *46228 and 46208 are the two ZIP codes that cover the Midtown Anchor Coalition study area boundaries, and their immediate surroundings. MAJOR EMPLOYER Intensity of employment combined with student population, support services - and additional traffic generated by special events, visitors and suppliers can drive demand for residential, office and retail uses adjacent to an anchor institution. Many anchors have made their campuses and communities more inviting by developing mixed-use districts at their edges. Other institutions have gone further, showing how anchors can facilitate dramatic changes in land use and shared value, using real estate development to drive local economic growth. To accomplish this shared value, anchors have used their endowments and foundations, sources of patient, long-term capital, to fund neighborhood-based real estate initiatives. Midtown Anchor Coalition institutions own a TOTAL OF 1,097 ACRES, which is about HALF THE SIZE OF DOWNTOWN INDIANAPOLIS. They also own over three million square feet of facilities, which is equivalent to over three Chase Towers. DRIVER OF LAND USE Anchors can have a significant impact on regional economic development with a focus on industry clusters. The success of anchor institutions in becoming drivers of innovation and community development lies in their ability to LINK LOCAL NETWORKS OF INTELLECTUAL AND BUSINESS INFRASTRUCTURE. By leading and collaborating with other anchor institutions, the private sector, and government, anchors can attract talent and venture capital, and spur new enterprise formation. Universities can help drive innovation, research and commercialization. Anchors can also help start- up firms with high growth potential by serving as geographic or virtual incubators. Cultural assets are also an important element for talent attraction and quality of life. With the combined efforts of the Midtown Anchor Coalition member institutions, arts and education are flourishing. The group is host to: the Indianapolis Museum of Art, one of the top five encyclopedic art collections in the country; Christian Theological Seminary, one of the most prominent seminaries in the state; the International School of Indiana, one of the top PS-12 schools in the country offering education to international standards and full language immersion programs; Butler University, which has earned over $6.8 million in research grants over the last five years, the Innovation Fund, which has invested in 28 projects since 2012, and the Butler Business Consulting Group, which has completed over 175 projects with 70 clients. CLUSTER ANCHOR Anchor institutions make significant investments in training and workforce development. Developing the workforce requires anchor institutions to EMBRACE A LEADERSHIP ROLE WITH OTHER BUSINESSES, SCHOOLS, AND COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS to build a pipeline of local residents with the requisite qualifications for employment. Once anchors identify the jobs that need to be filled and the education and training needed for those jobs, anchors can align them with the community’s education and job training system. WORKFORCE DEVELOPER PARTTIME-141 FULLTIME-152 The Midtown Anchor Coalition hired 293 new employees in 2014
  12. 12. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 20168 1 6 5 2 12 3 11 tarkington park9 indy connect purple line11 7 indiana farmers coliseum1 alice carter place park2 bertha ross park playground3 clarendon road enhancement4 4 broad ripple village parking garage5 art2art trail6 fall creek trail7 monon trail8 9 MIDTOWN TIF DISTRICT (collection area) MIDTOWN TIF DISTRICT (economic development area) GREAT PLACES 2020 (tarkington park focus area) INDY CONNECT PURPLE LINE alternative INDY CONNECT RED LINE completed / in-progress planned / proposed LAND AREA: POPULATION: EMPLOYEES: MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME: MEDIAN HOME VALUE: BACHELOR DEGREE ATTAINMENT: 12 SQ. MILES 49,351 19,974 $40,526 $187,461 48.9% BY THE NUMBERS: note: these total all of Midtown, beyond the Anchor Coalition study area source: Esri Business Analyst (2015) 10 the coil - canal esplenade indy connect red line12 8 38TH STREET COLLEGEAVENUE MICHIGANROAD CEN TRALCAN AL I-65 10
  13. 13. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 9 midtown The Midtown Anchor Coalition exists as a small part of what is generally known as Midtown, Indianapolis. The Midtown Indianapolis, Inc. organization, which oversees community development for the area, represents the myriad neighborhoods, business owners, and other organizations that have a significant stake in the area. A sampling of recent projects and planning efforts are described below. Today, Midtown benefits from the strong grid of streets, housing stock, public parks and greenspace, and institutional heritage left over from these roots. As a result, new development and redevelopment continues to occur in Midtown, and strong religious and educational options continue to cement the area’s status as a place to live, work, learn, and play. Midtown Indianapolis, Inc. is the community development corporation that promotes its 17 neighborhoods, oversees planning, policy, and projects. The director, Michael McKillip, has been serving Midtown since 2012. Carrollton Avenue Terrace | Character Rendering CENTRALINDIANA TRANSIT PLANPHASEONE HENDRICKSCOUNTY MARIONCOUNTY BOONECOUNTY HAMILTONCOUNTY 65 465 74 465 465 465 70 65 86TH ST 116TH ST 71ST ST 56TH ST 38TH ST 16TH ST MICHIGANST 10TH ST WASHINGTON MICHIGANRD KEYSTONEAVE COLLEGEAVE MERIDIANST BINFORDBLVD 146TH ST MAINST MAINST BOONECOUNTY MARIONCOUNTY HAMILTO MARION NOBLESV LAWRENCE IMS AIRPORT DOWNTOWN IRVINGTON IUPUI BUTLER UNIVERSITY LAFAYETTE SQUARE BROAD RIPPLE KEYSTONE ATTHECROSSING PARK100 EAGLE CREEK AMERIPLEX ZOO IMA STATE FAIR FORTHARRISON STATEPARK CASTLETON SQUAREMALL PALLADIUM CLAY TERRACE WEST CLAY THE PYRAMIDS TRADERS POINT UINDY GLENDALE MALL WESTFIELD MARTIN UNIVERSITY MARIAN UNIVERSITY CARMEL BEECH GROVE SPEEDWAY BENDAVIS FISHERS BROWNSBURG AVON IUHEALTH NORTHHOSPITAL COMMUNITY NORTHHOSPITAL ST.VINCENT HOSPITAL COMMUNITY EASTHOSPITAL ZIONSVILLE FOUNTAIN SQUARE ST.VINCENT CARMELHOSPITAL reconnecting to our waterways (r.o.w.) Reconnecting to Our Waterways is an initiative “designed to reclaim the benefits of Indianapolis’ waterways’; to provide opportunities for physical, human, and economic development….” The detrimental state of the major tributaries of the White River was the original focus of the effort, but the various planning efforts along them are now structured under R.O.W. The Midtown neighborhoods have a few tributaries, including the White River itself, the Central Canal, owned by Citizens Energy Group, and Fall Creek. The initiative is backed by the most significant philanthropists in Central Indiana, including, but not limited to, Eli Lilly and Company, BioCrossroads, and the Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF). the coil - canal esplanade The Coil is an example of the significant development activity happening in Midtown, in this case, along the Central Canal in Broad Ripple. Broad Ripple has long been a commercial center, dating back to the mid-19th century as a farming town, and now continues to compete in Central Indiana for investment. The Coil represents a redevelopment of an old and dilapidated apartment complex, and a brownfield site left from a gas station. This significant transformation will continue to add housing options and density to a cultural district halfway between downtown Indianapolis and Carmel, Indiana. The community was able to partner with the developer and Citizens Water to leverage the private development and fund upgrades to the Central Canal Towpath, a recreational trail. great places - tarkington park The Local Initiative Support Corporation’s (LISC) Great Places 2020 is a community development project that aims to transform six Marion County neighborhoods “into dynamic centers of culture, commerce and community, preparing Indianapolis for unprecedented success as we enter 2020. Each Great Place will be transformed through partnership, development and investment in: Livability, Opportunity, Vitality and Education.” The Tarkington Park focus area extends from 36th to 40th streets, and Boulevard Place to Pennsylvania Street. Great Places 2020, focusing on the city’s upcoming bicentennial, is supported by R.O.W., CICF, and JPMorgan Chase, among others. indy connect - red line Indy Connect is Central Indiana’s long-range transportation initiative, which shapes the future investment of the various transportation options of the region. Designed as an upgrade to the current IndyGo bus system, as well as five new bus rapid transit lines. The first line to be implemented will be the Red Line, which will eventually connect Westfield in the north to Greenwood in the south. The first phase, however, which may be operating within a decade, will connect the Butler-Tarkington and Crown Hill neighborhoods to Broad Ripple, downtown, and the University of Indianapolis. In addition to improved mobility options, the initiative also includes a transit-oriented development strategic plan. This TOD Strategic Plan lays a framework for land use, infrastructure, and real estate development around the planned stations, leveraging the transit investment as an economic development tool as well. Image Credit: Browning Day Mullins Deirdorf CURRENT MIDTOWN PROJECTS & PLANNING EFFORTS:
  14. 14. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 201610 hinkle fieldhouse howard l. schrott center for the arts schwitzer hall renovations holcomb building addition future academic building holcomb gardens secondary entry clarendon road improvements health & recreation complex mixed-use parking garage athletic fields & parking student housing building sunset avenue (phase 1 &2) 46th street entry round-about 1 5 9 10 11 12 13 13 9 2 6 3 7 84 1 5 2 6 3 4 4 completed / in-progress planned / proposed SUNSET AVENUE (phase 2) WHITERIVER 46TH STREET 52ND STREET HAMPTON DRIVE BOULEVARDPLACE CENTRALCANALANDTOWPATH 8 10 11 7 12
  15. 15. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 11 MIXED USE PARKING GARAGE JULY 23, 2014 Kessler Boulevard 38th Street 36th Street 37th Street 35th Street 34th Street 33rd Street 32nd Street 40th Street 42nd Street42nd Street 44th Street 46th Street 49th Street 52nd Street 54th Street 56th Street Hampton Drive 29th Street 28th Street Fall Creek Parkway 30th Street 30th Street CapitolStreet CorneliusAvenue ClarendonAvenue HaughleyAvenue BoulevardPlace CapitolStreet SunsetAvenue IllinoisStreet MeridianStreet KnolltonRoad Dr.Martin LutherKingJr.Street MichiganRoad In te rsta te 65 © 2014 Solomon Cordwell Buenz Solomon Cordwell Buenz BUTLER UNIVERSITY STUDENT HOUSING butler university LAND AREA: FACILITIES: ENROLLMENT: EMPLOYMENT: VISITORS: PURCHASING: BY THE NUMBERS: 290 ACRES 1,900,000 SQ FT 2,030 IN-STATE (48% OF TOTAL) 2,199 OUT-OF-STATE (50% OF TOTAL) 85 EXCHANGE PROGRAMS (INCLUDED IN ABOVE) 1,640 (190 LIVING IN MAC ZIP CODES / 11.6% OF TOTAL) 202 HIRES IN 2014 (99 FULL-TIME / 103 PART-TIME) 577,000+ ANNUALLY $68.2 MILLION+ (9.5% IN MAC ZIP CODES) campus figure ground study Butler University was founded in 1855 by attorney and abolitionist Ovid Butler. The University has over 60 major academic fields of study in six colleges and multiple opportunities to study abroad. Originally founded as North Western Christian University at 13th Street and College Avenue in downtown Indianapolis, the University moved to Irvington in 1875 before establishing its current campus in 1928. Situated in the Butler-Tarkington neighborhood, the 290-acre campus is approximately five miles from downtown Indianapolis. Butler is home to historic Hinkle Fieldhouse and the Butler Bulldogs, who participate in the BIG EAST athletic conference and Pioneer Football League. James M. Danko became Butler University’s 21st President in 2011. Butler is in the midst of historic and exciting change. The University has recently reinvested in their campus, with over $75 million spent in just the last few years. This includes a complete, award-winning renovation of Hinkle Fieldhouse, and the new LEED Gold Schrott Center for the Arts, which compliments an already robust performing arts program. Over $215 million of planned investment is still to come as Butler upgrades and builds new dormitories, academic buildings hosting business and science, and campus facilities. As an anchor for its neighborhood, Butler has continually pushed for livability improvements. BlueIndy, a car sharing company, has installed one of their initial stations on campus, and the University is working towards bringing bike share to the neighborhood, as well. Streetscape improvements continue to beautify the landscape around campus. Top: New mixed-use parking garage Bottom: New student housing building currently under construction 6 7 Image Credit: CSO Architects Image Credit: American Campus Communities
  16. 16. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 201612 completed / in-progress planned / proposed community cafe courtyard renovations spiritual trail 1 2 3 2 1 3 W HITE RIVER CENTRAL CANAL AND TOW PATH 42ND STREET HAMPTON DRIVE MICHIGANROAD
  17. 17. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 13 42nd Street 30th Street ClarendonAvenue HaughleyAvenue KnolltonRoad Dr.MartinLutherKingJr.Street MichiganRoad Interstate 65 christian theological seminary LAND AREA: FACILITIES: ENROLLMENT: EMPLOYMENT: VISITORS: PURCHASING: 40 ACRES 274,459 SQ FT 274 STUDENTS 8 EXCHANGE PROGRAMS 109 (12 LIVING IN MAC ZIP CODES / 11% OF TOTAL) 3 HIRES IN 2014 (3 FULL-TIME / 0 PART-TIME) 14,500+ ANNUALLY $13.9 MILLION+ (1.2% WITHIN MAC ZIP CODES) Christian Theological Seminary (CTS) is a fully accredited ecumenical graduate school related to the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). The Seminary offers eight graduate-level degree programs, each rooted in a rich history of biblical scholarship, theological openness, and spiritual discernment. The Seminary was founded in 1855 as the North Western Christian University at 13th Street and College Avenue in downtown Indianapolis, and existed under many names, including the School of Religion at Butler University. The Seminary became independent in 1958, and established its current campus in 1966 at Michigan Road and 42nd Street. The current, and sixth president, Matthew Myer Boulton joined CTS in 2011. Today, CTS has reinvented itself again. The Masters of Divinity curriculum, the Seminary’s largest, has been rewritten to match the needs of today’s congregations and communities. This overhaul is also part of an attempt to continue to attract more students of all ages to the Seminary. With growing demand for family and marriage counseling, as well as mental health counseling, CTS is in an important position to meet the demands of wellness-related fields. TakingadvantageoftheiruniquelocationalongtheCentralCanal,CTSisalso in the midst of a capital campaign for campus enhancement. The Spiritual Trail and courtyard improvements will allow for better spiritual connection to nature, which already sets CTS apart. CTS has been a supporter of many other organizations in the city, including the many diocesenal offices on campus at the Indiana Interchurch Center, and continues to work in concert with neighbors for improved pedestrian and bicycle connectivity around its campus. CTS is open to new certifications to meet the changing educational needs of today’s professionals, including programmatic collaborations with Butler University and Crown Hill Heritage Foundation. 6 7 2 3 Top: Graphic rendering of proposed courtyard improvements Bottom: Graphic perspective of proposed Spiritual Trail improvements BY THE NUMBERS: campus figure ground study Image Credit: Green 3 LLC Image Credit: Green 3 LLC
  18. 18. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 201614 virginia b. fairbanks art & nature park: 100 acres michigan road pedestrian improvements lilly house & garden improvements 38th street pedestrian connection 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 completed / in-progress planned / proposed 1 pedestrian connection to president’s house5 5 WHITE RIVER WOODSTOCK CLUB 38TH STREET CENTRALCANALANDTOW PATH MICHIGANROAD
  19. 19. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 15 30th Street HaughleyAvenue KnolltonRoad Dr.MartinLutherKingJr.Street MichiganRoad In terstate 65 indianapolis museum of art Robert Indiana’s LOVE sculpture on the Sutphin Mall LAND AREA: FACILITIES: EMPLOYMENT: VISITORS: PURCHASING: 152 ACRES 660,000 SQ FT 295 (21 LIVING IN MAC ZIP CODES / 7% OF TOTAL) 500,000+ ANNUALLY $22.9 MILLION+ (0.4% WITHIN MAC ZIP CODES) The Indianapolis Museum of Art (IMA) hosted its first exhibition at the English Hotel in downtown Indianapolis in 1853. Now with over 54,000 works spanning 5,000 years, the IMA is one of the 5 largest encyclopedic art museums in the country. The Museum’s first permanent location, along with the John Herron Art Institute, was established at 16th Street and Pennsylvania Street in 1902. The museum moved to its current location in 1970 on an estate donated by Eli Lilly’s grand children. The Museum consists of a 152-acre campus with galleries, Oldfields – Lilly House & Gardens, and The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park on Michigan Road at 38th Street. President Charles Venable has been serving the IMA since 2012. The IMA is focusing on long-term sustainability, as it shifts its membership program and offerings. The Museum will focus more on the value of its natural setting, gardens, historic properties, and educational programs, to attract more visitors and members. Focusing on pedestrian and bicycle access aligns the IMA with its neighbors, who are also interested in tying Midtown together. In the fall of 2015, the museum started the nation’s first preschool in an encyclopedic art museum. The school will use the more self-guided Reggio Emilia approach to early-childhood education. Families in the program will receive membership for a year. 1 BY THE NUMBERS: campus figure ground study
  20. 20. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 201616 gothic chapel renovations1 u.s. veteran’s columbarium clarendon road phase 2 improvements 2 3 1 3 completed / in-progress planned / proposed 2 CENTRALCANALANDTOW PATH WHITERIVER 38TH STREET MARTINLUTHERKINGJRBOULEVARD FUNERAL HOME, CEMETERY, & HERITAGE FOUNDATION
  21. 21. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 17 38th Street 36th Street 37th Street 35th Street 34th Street 33rd Street 32nd Street 40th Street 42nd Street42nd Street 44th Street 46th Street 49th Street 52nd Street Hampton Drive 29th Street 28th Street Fall Creek Parkway 30th Street 30th Street CapitolStreet CorneliusAvenue ClarendonAvenue HaughleyAvenue BoulevardPlace CapitolStreet SunsetAvenue IllinoisStreet MeridianStreet PennsylvaniaStreet WashingtonBoulevard KnolltonRoad Dr.MartinLuthe rKin gJr.Street MichiganRoad In te rsta te 65 crown hill cemetery Interior view of the recently renovated Gothic Chapel, located within the grounds of Crown Hill Cemetery LAND AREA: FACILITIES: EMPLOYMENT: VISITORS: PURCHASING: SERVICES: 555 ACRES 150,284 SQ FT 152 (15 LIVING IN MAC ZIP CODES / 10% OF TOTAL) 63 HIRES IN 2014 (29 FULL-TIME / 34 PART-TIME) 16,000+ ANNUALLY $4.0 MILLION+ 733 INTERMENTS IN 2014 182 ENTOMBMENTS IN 2014 131 CREMATIONS IN 2014 Crown Hill Cemetery was first incorporated as a non-profit, non- denominational, non-sectarian cemetery in 1863. Located along Martin Luther King Jr Boulevard and 38th Street, poet James Whitcomb Riley is buried at the top of the namesake hill, which is the highest point in the area. Other notable burials include President Benjamin Harrison, abolitionist Ovid Butler, author Booth Tarkington, bank robber John Dillinger, Colonel Eli Lilly, architect Bernard Vonnegut, and the surveyor who platted Indianapolis, Alexander Ralston, among many others. Keith Norwalk is the current President of Crown Hill Cemetery and the Crown Hill Heritage Foundation. With a vast collection of trees, and a rare piece of hilly terrain in Indianapolis, Crown Hill offers more than just a tranquil place for visiting the deceased. Crown Hill’s efforts to provide a wider range of programming, from grief counseling to choral performances and story-telling, makes them an active partner in the Midtown Anchor Coalition. Key connections can be improved along Martin Luther King Jr Blvd/Michigan Road, 38th Street, and Clarendon Road, to improve access to the grounds and facilities, aligning Crown Hill’s future strategies with the surrounding neighborhood. 1 BY THE NUMBERS: campus figure ground study
  22. 22. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 201618 completed / in-progress planned / proposed elementary school addition cross country course pedestrian bridge connection 1 2 3 1 2 3 W HITE RIVER MICHIGANROAD CENTRAL CANAL AND TOW PATH 42N D STREET
  23. 23. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 19 1 30th Street KnolltonRoad MichiganRoad Interstate 65 international school of indiana LAND AREA: FACILITIES; ENROLLMENT: EMPLOYMENT: PURCHASING: 65 ACRES 97,000 SQ FT 600 STUDENTS 116 (11 LIVING IN MAC ZIP CODES / 10% OF TOTAL) 25 HIRES IN 2014 (21 FULL-TIME / 4 PART-TIME) $5.1 MILLION+ The International School of Indiana (ISI), founded in 1994, offers a non- selective, integrated International Baccalaureate programme into a multilingual and multicultural curriculum. The education is delivered with an immersion model in Spanish, Mandarin, or French. The School serves over 600 students age three through grade 12 on two campuses. The Lower School, up to grade three, is located on Butler University’s campus, and the Upper School is located on 60-acres just north of the IMA on Michigan Road. Both campuses have libraries and athletic facilities. David Garner has been the Head of School since 2007. What was once a rare, internationally-focused and rigorous school, is now one of many strong educational options in Midtown. Attracting families is just as important for Midtown as it is for ISI as the school continues to differentiate its offerings. Through numerous collaborations, ISI continues to support the international focus of not just the neighborhood, but the city, as Indianapolis operates in a globalized society. Many of the other assets in the area assist ISI in attracting families, but they also share the challenges. Improved visibility from the city, partnerships with educational and cultural organizations, and transportation options would strengthen ISI’s efforts. Architectural rendering of proposed elementary school building to be constructed on ISI’s main campus BY THE NUMBERS: campus figure ground study
  24. 24. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 201620
  25. 25. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 21 framework plan The following framework plan is intended to serve as a guide and strategy toward community development among the anchor institutions in Midtown Indianapolis. With a focus on shared value that benefits the institution, and the community, the following plan will expand and deepen the coalition’s impact on the local and regional economy.
  26. 26. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 201622 MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING This Memorandum Of Understanding, by and between Butler Tarkington Neighborhood Association, Butler University, Christian Theological Seminary, Citizens Energy Group, Crown Hill Heritage Foundation, Indianapolis Museum of Art, International School of Indiana, and Midtown Indianapolis, Inc. (collectively referred to as “The Anchors”), memorializes the intent and commitment of the Anchors in relation to the establishment of the Midtown Anchor Coalition (MAC) In Indianapolis, Indiana. WHEREAS, The mission of the Butler-Tarkington Neighborhood Association is to represent the interests of residents and businesses in stabilizing, integrating and adapting the area to drivers of change; WHEREAS, The mission of Butler University is to provide the highest quality of liberal and professional education and to integrate the liberal arts with professional education,by creating and fostering a stimulating intellectual community built upon interactive dialogue and inquiry among students, faculty and staff; WHEREAS, the mission of Christian Theological Seminary is to form disciples of Jesus Christ for church and community leadership to serve God’s transforming of the world; WHEREAS, the mission of Citizens Energy Group is to provide safe, reliable services to our customers, while being good stewards of the environment; WHEREAS, the mission of Crown Hill Heritage Foundation is to preserve and celebrate the architectural, cultural and natural heritage of the city’s oldest urban green space, Crown Hill Cemetery; WHEREAS, the mission of Indianapolis Museum of Art is to provide exceptional experiences through engagement with art and nature to enrich the lives of our visitors; WHEREAS, the mission of the International School of Indiana is to support Indianapolis and Central Indiana in the attraction and retention of top talent by providing a world-class education that prepares students to be responsible citizens and effective leaders in a rapidly globalizing and interdependent world; WHEREAS, the mission of Midtown Indianapolis is to foster stronger connections between people and places in Indy’s Midtown; WHEREAS, the anchors collectively employ over 2,000 people with over $117 million in payroll, attract 1.1 million visitors annually, and own 1,100 acres of land and over three million square feet of facilities; and WHEREAS, the anchors are committed to enhancing the collective assets of Midtown as a premier destination in the region to live, work, play and learn. NOW, THEREFORE, the Anchors agree to share strategic plans and operations data to understand the goals and objectives of each anchor institution, identify areas of alignment, build consensus for priority projects and initiatives, and develop a framework plan and implementation strategy to optimize long-term and shared value between the anchor institutions, the City of Indianapolis and the Central Indiana region. We, the undersigned, execute this Memorandum of Understanding, effective this 26th , day of October, 2015. ___________________________________ Jeffrey Harrison Citizens Energy Group ___________________________________ Keith Norwalk Crown Hill Cemetery ___________________________________ Dr. Charles Venable Indianapolis Museum of Art ___________________________________ David Garner International School of Indiana ___________________________________ Michael McKillip Midtown Indianapolis, Inc. ___________________________________ Ted Feeney Butler Tarkington Neighborhood Association ___________________________________ James Danko Butler University ___________________________________ Dr. Matthew Boulton Christian Theological Seminary
  27. 27. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 23 The Midtown Anchor Coalition began with an initial meeting, hosted by Butler University, to determine the level of interest of anchor institutions in Midtown and in proximity to each other to collaborate on projects of common interest. While Midtown is home to other anchor institutions, the place-based nature of the project drove the composition of the coalition to include Butler-Tarkington Neighborhood Association, Butler University, Christian Theological Seminary, Citizens Energy Group, Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis Museum of Art, International School of Indiana, and Midtown Indianapolis. All of these organizations have a vested interest in the general area near 42nd Street and Michigan Road. Each anchor institution provided the consulting team with data to understand the collective impact of employment, visitors, students, workforce development, purchasing of goods and services, land use, civic engagement, and economic development. The consulting team conducted several days of field work on the campuses and in the surrounding neighborhoods, as well as a review of each anchor institution’s strategic plans and campus plans. Gaps and alignments surfaced as potential initiatives in which the institutions could collaborate. Relevant community development and public sector plans and initiatives in process such as the Midtown Master Plan, Reconnecting to our Waterways, Indy Connect, and Plan 2020 were also considered. Stakeholder meetings with the leadership of each anchor institution in the coalition clarified issues that surfaced from the background research and formed six distinct themes, which became the basis for the framework plan to follow. safety & security education attraction & identity collaboration & engagement housing & neighborhood connectivity & infrastructure Each theme is introduced within a context of observation and analysis. Goals, objectives, and potential initiatives follow, including projects, programs, and policies which, through a shared value strategy, are intended to benefit the anchor institutions and the local community. Implementing the framework plan often requires the creation of new processes and stakeholders working together to address issues and opportunities in new ways. A separate document addresses partnerships, geographic scopes, next steps, as well as an organizational structure, which is a critical consideration to ensure implementation. From the six themes and potential initiatives, five catalyst projects are presented in the form of “pitch kits.” The vision and concept, market demand, estimated costs, sources of funding, and other implementation considerations in the pitch kits provide a tool for generating support to advance the important work of the Midtown Anchor Coalition. process
  28. 28. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 201624 Go To SAVI.org Burglaries 2014 Midtown Anchor Coalition Map Created: 7/21/2015 Sources:SAVI, Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department 2014 All Crimes: Burglaries for the Year (per 1000 Population) Reporting by 2010 Census Tracts 0 12.4 or fewer 12.4 - 22.5 22.5 - 38.3 38.3 - 50.9 No Data Map data ©2015 GoogleReport a map error1 km  Page 1 of 2SAVI safety & security PERCEPTION VS. REALITY BURGLARY - 2014 CENSUS UNEMPLOYMENT - 2013 CENSUS A decision to move to a specific neighborhood or home involves a composite of factors that can be unique to a given household. A 2012 survey conducted by the Metro Indy Board of Realtors (MIBOR) and the Indianapolis Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) of 1,500 Central Indiana residents asked which factors were important when choosing a home and neighborhood to live in. It found that safety is the critical issue for most households. Ranked by responses of very important/important, safety of the community and level of crime (89%), and quality of local schools (78%) were more important than affordability of housing (74%). Among the other factors are access to medical care, property tax rates, access to cultural resources, privacy from neighbors, access to parks and trails, length of commute, sidewalks, walkability to shops and restaurants, and availability of quality public transit. The data reinforces findings from numerous case studies: revitalization strategies need to be comprehensive and address the broader community issues, including safety and security. With the exception of Crown Hill, which is bisected by 38th Street, most of the Midtown Anchor Coalition institutions are north of 38th Street, which has historically acted as a great divide in Indianapolis. Data illustrates that generally, the reality of safety and incidence of crime is very different on either side of 38th Street. To the north, many neighborhoods include strong or stable socio-economic indicators, good infrastructure, viable commercial nodes, and amenities. In contrast, south of 38th Street, specifically the area around the intersection of 34th Street and Illinois Street has been deemed one of six crime “hot spots” in the City. Alarming indicators of vacancy, poverty, single-parent households, and educational attainment contribute to significantly higher incidences of crime and further erode the neighborhood. The “hot spot” designation means multiple government agencies, community, church, civic and educational leaders are developing long-term goals and solutions to address safety and quality of life issues. This momentum can be leveraged to build on the focused efforts of the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department, Indianapolis Fire Department, Mayor’s Office of Re-Entry, Department of Workforce Development, and Department of Code Enforcement, as well as other organizations including the Central Indiana Community Foundation, the Lilly Endowment, the Indiana Bar Association, Keep Indianapolis Beautiful, Eskenazi Health, and the Polis Center. Supporting these focused efforts also will help sustain the neighborhoods around the Midtown Anchor Coalition and help them thrive. BURGLARIES CLUSTERED AROUND 38TH STREET: This map shows the burglaries clustered around, but not divided by, 38th Street, in 2014. However, throughout the study area there is a wide variation in crime rate per 1,000 people. The Census tracts north of 38th have crime rates of 5.89, 24.3, and 1.37 in the Butler Tarkington and Meridian Kessler area. Tracts south of 38th have crime rates of 24 and 30.6. HIGH UNEMPLOYMENT: Unemployment, as a percent of the workforce over 16, is generally high throughout most of the study area. However, there is a large student population in the Butler-Tarkington neighborhood, which skews the data, since many may be full-time students. Unemployment rates in census tracts north of 38th are 8.5 percent, 10.1 percent and 13.5 percent. Unemployment rates south of 38th are 21.9 percent, 23 percent and 20.6 percent. 38TH STREET 38TH STREET PUBLIC SAFETY FOCUS AREA 0 0.1 - 12.4 12.4 - 22.5 22.5 - 38.3 38.3 - 50.9 0 0.1% - 8.3% 8.3% - 15.5% 15.5% - 25.3% 25.3% - 41.2% Observation & Analysis: PUBLIC SAFETY FOCUS AREA
  29. 29. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 25 Go To SAVI.org Aggravated Assault in 2014 Midtown Anchor Coalition Census Blocks Map Created: 7/20/2015 Sources:SAVI, Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department 2014 All Crimes: Aggravated Assaults for the Year (per 1000 Population) Reporting by 2010 Blockgroups 0 6.26 or fewer 6.26 - 14.3 14.3 - 26.1 26.1 - 54.5 No Data Map data ©2015 GoogleReport a map error1 km  Page 1 of 2SAVI 7/20/2015http://www.savi.org/savi/Print/PrintMap.aspx?DataFormat=Map&zoom=13&ActiveMap... safety & security PERCEPTION VS. REALITY AGGRAVATED ASSAULT - 2014 CENSUS LARCENY - 2014 CENSUS “Much of the crime impacting neighborhoods in cities across America stems from societal failure to address decades-old social issues. In order to make our residents and neighborhoods safer, we must holistically address issues such as poverty, lack of quality education, lack of positive mentors and mental illness. This effort will help us pinpoint the problems that are leading to criminal activity and address those issues to improve the quality of life for people living in our most challenged areas.” - Former Mayor Greg Ballard THE 38TH STREET DIVISION: This map shows the occurrence of aggravated assault in the census tracts around the Midtown Anchor Coalition for 2014. There is a wide variation in crime rate, especially in a relatively small area. The crime rate is measured in incidents/1,000 people in a given year. The three tracts in the study area north of 38th have rates of .68, .171, and 6.46. The three tracts in the study area south of 38th have much higher rates: 20.4, 34.2 (highest in city), and 13.1. LARCENY IS ISOLATED: Highlighted in the center of this map is the singular cluster of larceny in the study area. This is illustrated by the contrast west and north of the 34th/Illinois area. Census tracts north of 38th have crime rates of 14.7, 22.8 and 4.6. Tracts south of 38th have rates of 20, 60.7 and 34.3. 38TH STREET 38TH STREET 0 0.1 - 6.26 6.26 - 14.3 14.3 - 26.1 26.1 + 0 0.1 - 26.5 26.5 - 50.5 50.5 - 109.5 109.5 - 199 PUBLIC SAFETY FOCUS AREA PUBLIC SAFETY FOCUS AREA
  30. 30. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 201626 CRIME PREVENTION THROUGH ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN Overgrown and unkept parkway trees and landscape areas can negatively impact the perception of an area. Investments in public art installations can serve as positive indicator of community pride and an added sense of ownership for residents. The use of upgraded materials and enhanced pavement markings on Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd helps identify safe zones. Clearly identified surveillance systems and neighborhood programs can foster a positive sense of awareness within a community. Replacement of boarded up windows can improve the perception of crime in an area. The use of design elements such as fences and railing reinforce the separation of public and private space. CHARACTER IMAGES Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) includes strategies to directly modify the environment to take advantage of pre-existing environmental assets or change the design features and condition of particular targets (e.g., store fronts, parking garages, or abandoned buildings) or areas in an effort to reduce crime. CPTED strategies are often linked with other community-based crime prevention strategies, which emphasizes tailoring crime prevention strategies to solve specific problems. As with other types of community-based crime prevention programs, CPTED is made up of multiple elements or approaches and can be used by various stakeholders. CPTED strategies address quality of life issues by attempting to deter criminal activity, increase overall safety for citizens, and reduce citizen fear of crime. CPTED strategies are thus evaluated for success to determine not only whether crime was reduced but also whether citizen perceptions of crime were affected by implementation of the strategy. safety & security Observation & Analysis:
  31. 31. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 27 CRIME PREVENTION THROUGH ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN cpted design principles natural surveillance natural access control natural territorial enforcements maintenance activity support Taking steps to increase the perception that people can be seen. Understanding the relationship of natural features and the activities of people can maximize visibility and foster positive social interaction through: • Increasedpedestrian and bicycleamenities • Placementofwindowsoverlooking sidewalks • Maintainingvisual clearingaboveshrubsand plantingareas • Increasedlighting • Limiteduseofdark orreflectiveglass Taking steps to differentiate public and private spaces through the use of design elements such as: • Clearlydefinedpathsandaccesspoints • Promotesinglevs.Multipleaccesspoints • Fencesandbarriers • Identifiablesignageatentryandaccesspoints • Designationofrestricteduseareas • Differentiate fencing between front yards and side or back yards Taking steps to differentiate public and private spaces to foster a sense of awareness and ownership through the use of design elements such as: • Clearlymarkedandidentifiablesignage • Recognizablepavementmaterials/markings • Recognizablesecurityandsurveillancesystems • Concentratingpublicamenitiestocommonareas • Utilizeauditorycueswhenenteringor exitinganarea Taking steps to ensure that public and private properties are always well maintained to communicate the sense that a space is occupied and used: • Establish neighborhood clean-upprograms • Removevandalism promptlyafterincidentsoccur Taking steps to create visual cues and activate spaces to indicate that an area is being used and watched such as: • ‘ChildrenatPlay’signage • Notificationsignsforpublicorprivatewatchgroups • Encourageresidentstoactivelyreportsignsofcrime orvandalism • Promoteneighborhoodengagementthroughgroup eventsandactivities safety & security
  32. 32. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 201628 FOSTER A CONSISTENTLY SAFE & SECURE EXPERIENCE FOR RESIDENTS, EMPLOYEES, STUDENTS, VISITORS AND PATRONS GOAL: Coordination between many stakeholders is important for public safety initiatives’ success.
  33. 33. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 29 OBJECTIVE: ADDRESS THE REAL AND PERCEIVED INCIDENCES OF CRIME IN THE AREA THROUGH PUBLIC, PRIVATE, AND COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS AND ALIGN THOSE EFFORTS WITH OTHER CITY-WIDE INITIATIVES EXPAND CONTENT AND COMMUNICATION CHANNELS TO EDUCATE ANCHOR INSTITUTION EMPLOYEES, STUDENTS, AND VISITORS AS WELL AS RESIDENTS ON SPECIFIC STRATEGIES TO INCREASE PERSONAL AND COMMUNITY SAFETY • Expand the Butler Dawg Watch, an adaptation of the successful community block watch programs and Dawg Alert, a public awareness communication system • Establish a new Dawg Alert web portal that is composed for the community CONTINUE TO UTILIZE BUTLER-TARKINGTON NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION AND MIDTOWN INDIANAPOLIS TO PROVIDE FORUMS FOR THE EXCHANGE AND COORDINATION OF IDEAS, CONCEPTS, AND STRATEGIES TO PREVENT AND REDUCE CRIME IN THE AREA • Conduct regular round table meetings with representatives of the Department of Public Safety, Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department, and Butler University Police Department DEVELOP A COMPREHENSIVE SAFETY AND SECURITY PLAN TO ADDRESS STUDENT, RESIDENT, AND COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT IN THE REDUCTION OF CRIME AND THE OPPORTUNITY FOR CRIMES TO BE COMMITTED • Engage with partners already involved in the City of Indianapolis’s hotspot program to extend best-practices to other areas of Midtown (e.g., night walk with students) BUILD STRONGER RELATIONSHIPS WITH THE INDIANAPOLIS METROPOLITAN POLICE DEPARTMENT AND BUTLER UNIVERSITY POLICE DEPARTMENT TO ENHANCE SAFETY THROUGH COMMUNITY POLICING STRATEGIES • Explore the feasibility of a joint policing program between the anchor institutions, to extend the coverage and frequency of the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department with security from the Indianapolis Museum of Art and Butler University Police Department WORK WITH LOCAL MEDIA AND NEIGHBORHOOD GROUPS SUCH AS MIDTOWN INDIANAPOLIS INC. AND BUTLER TARKINGTON NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION TO ADVANCE MESSAGES ON SAFETY AND SECURITY INITIATIVES AND SPECIFIC RESULTS OF THE EFFORTS AND PROGRAMS • Engage the public relations professionals of the anchor institutions to develop a communications plan including internal communications, social media, government relations, and media relations PILOT CRIME PREVENTION PROGRAMS WITHIN BUTLER TARKINGTON NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION, WHICH CAN SCALE TO MIDTOWN INDIANAPOLIS AND THE BROADER COMMUNITY • Implement a program on Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED), a multi-disciplinary approach to deterring criminal behavior through environmental design, including: 1. Natural Surveillance: taking steps to increase the perception that people can be seen (e.g., limiting shrubs and lighting) 2. Natural Access Control: differentiating private and public space through design elements such as paths and fences 3. Natural Territorial Enforcements: making it clear that property is either private or public, through design additions such as signage 4. Maintenance: keeping private and public properties well-maintained to communicate the sense that space is being used 5. Activity Support: creating visual cues and active spaces, such as “children playing” signs and bike trails, to indicate that space is being used and watched 1 5 2 3 6 4 safety & security INITIATIVES
  34. 34. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 201630 BUTLER LAB SCHOOL INDIANAPOLIS MUSEUM OF ART preschool INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF INDIANA INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF INDIANA lower school preschools primary schools secondary schools International School Of Indiana IMA Preschool Montessori Meridian Learning Village Montessori School Fairview Presbyterian St. Richard’s Episcopal School Hasten Hebrew Academy Indiana School for the Deaf MAGNETS CFI School #2 IB (2.75/4.0) CFI School #27 IB (4.0/4.0) Cold Spring School (4.0/4.0) Francis W. Parker School #56 (4.0/4.0) George Washington Carver #87 (3.25/4.0) Rousseau McClellan #91 (4.0/4.0) Ernie Pyle #90 (4.0/4.0) Butler Lab School/William Bell #60 Theodore Potter #74 (3.0/4.0) Mary E Nicholson Academy #70 (3.5/4.0) Broad Ripple High School (3.23/4.0) PRIVATE International School Of Indiana The Oaks Academy Sycamore School The Orchard School Park Tudor Indiana School for the Deaf PAROCHIAL Hasten Hebrew Academy Immaculate Heart Of Mary Catholic School St. Richard’s St. Joan Of Arc St. Luke St. Monica St. Thomas Aquinas MAGNETS Shortridge IB / Gambold Prep (4.0/4.0) Arsenal Tech STAR Ag and Environmental Magnet Career Technology Magnet Health Professions Magnet Law and Public Policy Magnet Math and Science Magnet New Tech Magnet CHARTER Herron High School (4.0/4.0) Tindley Accelerated School PRIVATE International School of Indiana Park Tudor Indiana School for the Deaf PAROCHIAL Bishop Chatard Cathedral Christ the King THE RESIDENTS OF MIDTOWN HAVE A LARGE VARIETY OF QUALITY SCHOOLS TO CHOOSE FROM IN THE AREA A sampling of public schools scoring over a 2.75/4.0 from the Indiana Department of Education’s school grade system, as well as secular and parochial private schools are shown to illustrate the wide range of choices available to residents of the study area. Only some are selective, such as Sycamore School, and many offer content specialization, such as language at the International School of Indiana, and IPS’ magnets. All are within a 20-minute drive, and many are closer. 38TH STREET I-65 MICHIGANROAD CEN TRALCAN AL
  35. 35. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 31 education ACCESS TO EXCELLENCE In a 2012 survey conducted by the Metro Indy Board of Realtors (MIBOR) and the Indianapolis Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) 1,500 Central Indiana residents, where asked which factors were important when choosing a home and neighborhood to live in. Quality of local schools was ranked as very important/important when choosing a home and neighborhood by 78% of respondents, second only to safety of the community and level of crime. Irrespective of whether households have school-age children, quality of local schools is important when choosing a home and neighborhood because it is perceived as a proxy for neighborhood stability and protection of property values. Led by the International School of Indiana, the Butler Lab School at William Bell School 60, and the recently opened pre-school at the Indianapolis Museum of Art, this particular area of Midtown has some of the finest PK-12 school options in the State of Indiana. Further, Midtown and the broader area are home to many excellent school options including public, private and parochial. Coupled with the higher education offerings of Butler University and Christian Theological Seminary, the Midtown Anchor Coalition offers an unmatched continuum of educational programming, from PK-12, bachelors, masters, and doctoral degree programs, as well as non-degree course offerings, continuing education, and arts and cultural programming. However, some of the immediate public schools in the area, including James Whitcomb Riley School 43, are challenged. With enrollment of 424 students in grades K through 8, nearly 80% are on free and reduced lunch, reflecting the poverty of the households in the area. In recent years, students have performed below the Indiana and Indianapolis Public Schools average on the ISTEP test. The quality of local public schools matters to households considering whether to move to or stay in a neighborhood. Schools that are integrated into a community enable students to forge networks and social skills through mentoring relationships with caring adults, school-to-work learning, community service and other experiences, while providing parents with similar opportunities to learn. A focused outreach effort to support and assist the public schools in the area is a shared value strategy that will benefit the anchor institutions, and most importantly, the children and families in the neighborhood. butler lab school - william bell #60 indianapolis museum of art - preschool international school of indiana TheIPS/ButlerLaboratorySchoolislocatedattheformerWilliamA.BellSchool#60.Working with the Butler University College of Education and Indianapolis Public Schools, College of Education students are gaining valuable experience in the classrooms. Using the Reggio Emelia philosophy, students are taught, and learn, in a project-based environment. Lessons are given in math, reading, and writing, and students are then free to work throughout the classroom, usually in an absence of desks, or assigned seating, and encouraged to ask questions and problem solve with others. Founded in 1994, ISI is a PS-12 school enrolling 600 students from the local and international community. It offers a unique blend of International Baccalaureate curriculum and immersion learning in French, Mandarin and Spanish. Many members of ISI’s faculty are hired from outside the USA. All high school students take the full IB Diploma. The Class of 2015 scored a 100% graduation rate and a 93% IB Diploma success rate, some 17% higher than the world average. In addition, many received the IB Bilingual Diploma. The Washington Post ranks ISI the top high school in Indianapolis, the 6th in the Midwest and 81st in the nation. For the first time in the United States, an encyclopedic art museum will offer a preschool beginning in 2015. The school will be run by St. Mary’s Child Center for 3 to 5 year old children. Half of the students will be offered full scholarship, and all students and their families will be offered access to the full campus, with full IMA memberships. Utilizing the art and natural resources of the IMA, teaching will follow the Reggio Emilia approach, which emphasizes collaboration, critical learning, expression, and immersive experiences. Observation & Analysis:
  36. 36. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 201632 LEVERAGE THE UNIQUE PK-16 AND ADULT EDUCATIONAL ASSETS OF MIDTOWN AS A QUALITY OF LIFE AMENITY TO MAKE MIDTOWN A COMMUNITY OF CHOICE GOAL: Children’s activites are an important part of Indianapolis Museum of Art programming.
  37. 37. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 33 PROMOTE COLLECTIVELY THE UNIQUE OPTIONS OF HIGH-PERFORMING PRIVATE, PAROCHIAL, AND PUBLIC SCHOOL OPTIONS WITHIN MIDTOWN, INCLUDING THE INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF INDIANA, THE BUTLER LAB SCHOOL, AND THE INDIANAPOLIS MUSEUM OF ART’S PRESCHOOL • Promote Midtown’s school options to families through the anchor institutions, Metropolitan Indianapolis Board of Realtors, Indy Chamber, human resource departments, etc. • Utilize greatschools.org, an online resource that effectively communicates school options, while also adding information that tells the story of each school ESTABLISH PARTNERSHIPS BETWEEN THE ANCHOR INSTITUTIONS AND PK-12 SCHOOLS IN THE IMMEDIATE AREA TO BUILD MUTUALLY BENEFICIAL PROGRAMS • Support the LISC Great Places effort around Education at the Tarkington Park focus area and James Whitcomb Riley School 43 BUILD LOCAL AND NATIONAL AWARENESS OF THE DEVELOPING HUB OF INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION IN MIDTOWN, WITH PROGRAMS AND EVENTS • Work with the Indy Chamber’s business attraction efforts to introduce international companies to the international education hub of Midtown, while also introducing students to opportunities in international business • Collaborate and promote unique international education options, including Butler’s Lab School, Butler’s IB Teaching and Learning Program, and Shortridge High School EXPLORE THE FEASIBILITY OF JOINING OTHER MIDTOWN ANCHOR INSTITUTIONS SUCH AS THE CHILDREN’S MUSEUM AND IVY TECH COMMUNITY COLLEGE IN EDUCATION RELATED STRATEGIES AND INITIATIVES WITHIN MIDTOWN • Explore the potential to develop a new Family Learning Navigator pilot program, which will assist residents in pursuing education and career opportunities • Promote lifelong learning and explore new certificate and adult learning programs among multiple anchor institutions, which could include experiential learning (e.g., grief counseling between Crown Hill and CTS) ESTABLISH MENTORING, COACHING, SUPPORT RELATIONSHIPS AND OTHER SERVICE-LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES TO ENGAGE ANCHOR INSTITUTION STUDENTS, FACULTY, AND STAFF IN THE WELLBEING OF SCHOOL CHILDREN IN THE AREA • Develop a tutoring and mentoring program with local children to nurture college and career aspirations 1 5 2 3 4 OBJECTIVE: OFFER RESIDENTS OF MIDTOWN THE MOST PK-16 AND ADULT EDUCATIONAL OPTIONS FOR EXCELLENT PRIVATE, PUBLIC, AND PAROCHIAL EDUCATION IN THE REGION, WHILE ENHANCING THE COMPETITIVENESS OF THE MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION MEMBERS education INITIATIVES
  38. 38. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 201634 View of the scenic Central Canal Towpath cutting through the Indianapolis Museum of Art’s 100 Acres Park, provides access to a regional trail system and unparalleled access to nature in the heart of Indianapolis SITUATED BETWEEN THREE REGIONAL TRAIL SYSTEMS, TWO MAJOR WATERWAYS, AND WITH ACCESS TO OVER 600 ACRES OF PARKS AND GREEN SPACE, MIDTOWN INDIANAPOLIS HAS AN UNPARALLELED ACCESS TO NATURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT
  39. 39. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 35 attraction & identity ENVIRONMENT & NATURE Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973, Crown Hill Cemetery comprises 555 acres of park-like setting, with 130 species of trees identified. Oldfields - Ruth Lilly House and Gardens, was designed by landscape architects Olmsted Brothers, a successor to the firm founded by Frederick Law Olmsted. Observation & Analysis: While downtown Indianapolis has its own identity and amenities, Midtown is a unique urban experience. Culture, arts, design, history, sports, recreation, and open space are offered by the Midtown Anchor Coalition institutions in a natural environment that is unlike any in the city, region or state. This distinction needs to be preserved and enhanced for existing residents, and as a driver to attract new residents, employees, students, and visitors to Midtown. Open space is a big part of that unique urban experience. According to the Trust for Public Land, Indianapolis ranks 73rd out of 75 big cities for access to parks and open space, yet Midtown can count quality open space as an asset. Each anchor institution has strong natural elements within its boundaries, which when viewed as a whole, can be a defining advantage for the district. The Central Canal Towpath, under the stewardship of Citizens Energy Group, is a chain that connects the anchors. The benefits of agglomeration, where a visitor to one institution should easily be able to visit another, due to proximity, can become an important attraction and identity strategy. Sustainability is a common value among the missions and strategic plans of the anchor institutions. Economic, social, and environmental sustainability can inspire project, program, and policy initiatives among the Midtown anchor institutions. In addition, wellness can be a powerful organizing framework for attraction and identity. The six dimensions of wellness – intellectual, social, physical, spiritual, occupational, emotional, and environmental – are all represented by the Midtown anchor institutions.
  40. 40. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 201636 Interior view of Butler’s Irwin Library, designed by renowned architect Minoru Yamasaki, who also designed the original World Trade Center towers in New York.
  41. 41. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 37 Through the generous financial support of J. Irwin Miller, Chairman of the Cummins Engine Company, and enthusiast of modern architecture, the 37-acre campus and mid-century modern architecture of the Christian Theological Seminary exists as it is today. Leading the architectural renaissance occurring in Columbus, Indiana, Miller established a heritage of quality design and architecture unlike any other area in country. CHRISTIAN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY BUTLER UNIVERSITY INDIANAPOLIS MUSEUM OF ART ARCHITECTURE & HERITAGE attraction & identity Butler University, Christian Theological Seminary, and the International School of Indiana, each have iconic campuses, with a variety of outdoor and recreation spaces. Crown Hill, with 555 park-like acres and over 130 species of trees, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Indianapolis Museum of Art features 100-Acres - The Fairbanks Art and Nature Park, and the Lilly House and Gardens, a National Historic Landmark and listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In the 1960’s, Christian Theological Seminary and the Butler University campuses witnessed the construction of two new buildings that would come to represent a collection of preeminent architecture unlike any other area in Indianapolis. Edward Larrabee Barnes, a prominent american architect of his time, was recommended by Eero Saarinen for the design of Christian Theological Seminary. Minoru Yamasaki, architect for the World Trade Center buildings, in that same decade designed and constructed Irwin Library, thus establishing a heritage of quality design for these two institutions. Observation & Analysis: When it was built in 1928, Butler Fieldhouse was the largest basketball arena in the United States, and it retained that title until 1950. Renamed Hinkle Fieldhouse in 1966, it is the sixth-oldest college basketball arena still in use. In 1983, it was placed on the National Register of Historic Places and in 1987 it was designated as a National Historic Landmark in recognition of its role in transforming college basketball. The interior of the fieldhouse figures prominently in the classic movie Hoosiers, where the actual title game depicted in the movie was held. It recently underwent a $36 million renovation. The IMA continues to uphold high standards with the Ruth Lilly Visitor’s Pavilion, a LEED- certified structure designed by Marlon Blackwell Architects. Many sustainable features throughout lessen the building’s environmental impact, including a geothermal heating and cooling system. This structure was recognized by the American Institute of Architects with a 2012 Honor Award, the first for a building in Indiana in 30 years.
  42. 42. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 201638 PROVIDE UNIQUE AND AUTHENTIC URBAN EXPERIENCES FOR ARTS, CULTURE, HISTORY, SPORTS AND RECREATION FOR INDIANAPOLIS AND THE REGION, WHILE CELEBRATING THE DISTINCT NATURAL ENVIRONMENT OF MIDTOWN AS THE HEART OF INDIANAPOLIS. GOAL: View of the Holcomb Memorial Carillon which is nestled in Holcomb Gardens at Butler University.
  43. 43. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 39 ADVOCATE AND ENFORCE A STANDARD OF HIGH QUALITY DESIGN FOR THE AREA TO ENHANCE THE IDENTITY OF MIDTOWN • Support the Butler-Tarkington Neighborhood Association and Midtown Indianapolis to engage proactively with the private and public sectors to advance great design in architecture, landscape architecture, and infrastructure PRESERVE THE DISTINCTIVE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT WITH A COMMITMENT FROM THE ANCHOR INSTITUTIONS TO ADOPT SUSTAINABLE POLICIES AND PRACTICES, SHARE LESSONS LEARNED, AND PURSUE JOINT INITIATIVES WHEN POSSIBLE • Identify recreational and open space amenities not currently offered, or optimized, in Midtown and seek partnerships to develop them (e.g., dog park) USING WELLNESS AS AN ORGANIZING FRAMEWORK, EXPLORE THE FEASIBILITY OF DEVELOPING AND PROMOTING JOINT PROGRAMS AMONG THE ANCHOR INSTITUTIONS, ENCOMPASSING MIND-BODY-SPIRIT PRINCIPLES: INTELLECTUAL, SOCIAL, PHYSICAL, SPIRITUAL, OCCUPATIONAL, EMOTIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL • Evaluate the feasibility of discounted wellness programs to employees of the other anchor institutions (e.g. CTS offering mental health counseling at a discount, or Butler Health and Recreation Center memberships at a discount) WORK WITH VISIT INDY TO ALIGN THE INITIATIVES AND STRATEGIES OF THE MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION WITH THE VISIT INDY TOURISM MASTER PLAN AND JOINTLY PROMOTE PROGRAMS WITH VISIT INDY • Collaborate among the anchor institutions in the development of a program and a unique hotel consistent with the brand of the anchor institutions and Midtown • Collaborate with Visit Indy to promote unique Midtown Anchor Coaltion assets in their marketing materials EXPLORE THE FEASIBILITY OF AN ANCHOR EMPLOYEE AND MIDTOWN RESIDENT BENEFIT PROGRAM • Develop a list of programs, events, and restaurant benefits which could be packaged as an exclusive offering for anchor employee and Midtown residents DEFINE AND DEVELOP A SIGNAGE AND WAYFINDING SYSTEM THAT WORKS WITHIN A LARGER BRAND STRATEGY AND IDENTITY OF MIDTOWN • Seek professional services to consider the master brand and public relations strategy for Midtown as well as the anchor institutions • Define and celebrate key gateways (e.g., Michigan Road Bridge, 38th Street, etc.) that work within a larger brand strategy and identity of Midtown • Develop a funding strategy that considers initial capital costs, as well as long-term maintenance 1 6 2 3 5 4 INITIATIVES attraction & identity OBJECTIVE: IMPROVE THE QUALITY OF LIFE OF EXISTING RESIDENTS OF MIDTOWN, WHILE INCREASING THE LENGTH OF STAY AND NUMBER OF PEOPLE COMING TO MIDTOWN TO LIVE, WORK, LEARN AND VISIT.
  44. 44. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 201640 Crown HIll Cemetery hosts the annual Beyond the Badge 5K Run and Walk, a fundraiser meant to honor those in public safety who have fallen in the line of duty.
  45. 45. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 41 MIDTOWN I N D I A N A P O L I S L O V E S LO C A L There is a symbiotic relationship between communities and their anchor institutions. Increasingly, the success of Midtown’s anchor institutions is inextricably linked to the surrounding community. Anchors depend on a vibrant Midtown and Indianapolis to provide a supportive social, political and economic climate to do business. In turn, Indianapolis depends on the Midtown anchor institutions to provide employment, education or cultural services, purchase local goods and services, and support the community. The Midtown anchor institutions share a commitment to the neighborhood, the city and the region. They serve these constituencies in innumerable ways. But, much of these efforts are uncoordinated and un-leveraged, which misses an opportunity. Collaboration and engagement efforts in a strategic and coordinated manner can leverage each anchor’s particular competencies to address high-need areas of the community. North America’s only academic center in a university and seminary context named for Archbishop Emeritus Tutu, the Desmond Tutu Center is a collaborative effort of Butler University and the Christian Theological Seminary. The center promotes the legacy of Archbishop Desmond Tutu, with his holistic understanding of reconciliation grounded in justice, human dignity, and social transformation. Midtown Loves Local is a campaign supported by locally owned, independent businesses in Midtown Indianapolis to create and build awareness that spending locally sustains the local economy, keeps the community unique, creates jobs, and is ultimately an investment in the success of Midtown. Butler University Jordan College of the Arts has ongoing partnerships with six local arts organizations, five of which are housed on campus in Lilly Hall, offering great opportunities for students to interact with professionals working in the arts. • Dance Kaleidoscope • Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra • Indianapolis Symphonic Choir • American Pianists Association • Indianapolis Children’s Choir • Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra • Indianapolis Opera • Sustain Our Local Economy • Keep Our Community Unique • Invest In Your Community • Create Jobs collaboration & engagement EVENTS & PROGRAMMING midtown loves local the hive butler university performing arts collaborative desmond tutu center The HIVE at Christian Theological Seminary promotes initiatives that explore new forms of ministry and apply creative and collaborative thinking and a variety of approaches to solving the challenges that face our local communities and the world. It’s also a place of spiritual care and encouragement for those whose efforts are critical to the life and health of our communities. And naturally, being within the walls of a seminary, educating and helping to grow leaders in faith is an important piece of the HIVE’s mission. Observation & Analysis:
  46. 46. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 201642 Movie nights at the IMA represent a new commitment to community-based programming
  47. 47. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 43 EVENTS & PROGRAMMING collaboration & engagement Located in the heart of Indianapolis, the institutions of Midtown quietly compete with the cultural districts of downtown Indianapolis and Carmel. With the recent addition of the Howard L. Schrott Center for the Arts, Midtown rivals these other areas as a center of arts and culture that has far from reached its potential. Midtown Anchors’ cultural venues seat over 13,000 people, and are capable of hosting plays, musical performances, exhibits, retreats, movies, and top level collegiate sporting events. When thought of as a group, these attractors can serve the needs of just about any visitor or resident. THE MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION ATTRACTS OVER 1.1 MILLION VISITORS PER YEAR. This represents a significant opportunity to showcase the district’s assets, and to win over repeat-visitors, who may also be future students, residents, or employees. In order to grow the number of visitors, and their length of stay, a choice of events ranging in size and scope is important. There are already many annual events that are small, attracting a very local audience, and/or large, attracting a wider regional, or even national, audience. These include everything from art classes to Butler Bulldog basketball games. With many unique venues, both indoor and outdoor, a variety of events and programs can be hosted by the anchor institutions, while coordinated inventory and scheduling can help ensure utilization. Observation & Analysis: MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION VENUES Seating Capacity HINKLE FIELDHOUSE CLOWES MEMORIAL HALL TOBIAS THEATRE HOWARD L. SCHROTT CENTER FOR ARTS SHELTON AUDITORIUM CROWN HILL GOTHIC CHAPEL DEBOEST THEATRE EIDSON-DUCKWALL RECITAL HALL 9,100 2,172 530 450 425 180 168 140 TOTAL SEATS 13,165
  48. 48. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 201644 BUILD AND STRENGTHEN THE MIDTOWN AND INDIANAPOLIS COMMUNITIES THROUGH INTENTIONAL AND MUTUALLY BENEFICIAL COLLABORATION AND ENGAGEMENT WITH LOCAL STAKEHOLDERS, LINKING INSTITUTIONAL PRIORITIES WITH COMMUNITY NEEDS GOAL: Christian Theological Seminary President Matt Boulton welcomes Archbishop Desmond Tutu.
  49. 49. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 45 SUPPORT EXISTING MISSION-ALIGNED PROGRAMS AND EVENTS BETWEEN ANCHOR INSTITUTIONS, LEVERAGING INVESTMENTS IN EXPERTISE, STAFF AND FACILITIES • Existing Midtown programs include the Midtown Future Plan, Midtown Home Tour, Midtown Education Summit, and Midtown Momentum Luncheon • Existing programs which affect Midtown include Reconnecting to Our Waterways, the International Marketplace, and Great Places- Tarkington Park • The Penrod Arts Fair, one of the nation’s largest single day arts fairs, could include complementary programs and co-marketing with the other anchor institutions to attract new visitors to Penrod Arts Fair and extend length of stay • Compile and promote a shared events database for all MAC institutions DEVELOP A SUSTAINABLE ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE TO CONTINUE ANCHOR INSTITUTION COLLABORATION AROUND ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES, INCLUDING PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT, PUBLIC POLICY, FUNDING, AND MARKETING/BRANDING • Support Midtown Indianapolis, Inc. as the implementing partner to market and promote the Midtown District • Develop a strategy for engaging other Midtown Partners (State Fair Grounds, The Children’s Museum, Ivy Tech) COMMIT TO SHARE INSTITUTION STRATEGIC PLANS AND MASTER PLANS, AND ESTABLISH A REGULAR FORUM TO COLLABORATE ON PROJECTS OF COMMON INTEREST • In building community support for a project, coordinate public and community relations strategically to leverage the anchor’s particular competencies, and constituencies CAPITALIZE ON THE EXTENSIVE INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE AND RESOURCES OF THE ANCHOR INSTITUTIONS IN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE TO HELP BUILD THE GLOBAL BRAND OF INDIANAPOLIS AND INDIANA WHILE CREATING EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES • Support Global Indy and the Global Cities Initiative, two programs of the Indy Chamber, designed to educate and assist local companies looking to expand into international markets as well as connect international companies with local opportunities • Create joint programs with the International Marketplace Coalition, recognized by the New York Times as being a place “where the world comes to eat” (e.g. invite restaurants to events in Midtown) DEVELOP NEW SIGNATURE AND RECURRING EVENTS TO HELP REINFORCE THE BRAND • A Midtown Day of Service could leverage Butler’s Bulldogs into the Streets (BITS) and include the other anchor institutions BUILD ON THE LISC/INDY CHAMBER ANCHOR-BASED PURCHASING INITIATIVE ON GOODS AND SERVICES IN MARION COUNTY • Expand on Midtown Loves Local, and connect to the LISC/Indy Chamber “Buy Indy” initiative, a plan to identify joint purchasing opportunities to buy local, while reducing cost and improving quality CREATE A STRONGER PHYSICAL AND PROGRAMMATIC CONNECTION TO TARKINGTON PARK AS THE “MONUMENT CIRCLE OF MIDTOWN” AND TO HELP BRIDGE THE DIVIDE OF 38TH STREET • Provide primary care services and wellness programs, through the Butler University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, in conjunction with other wrap-around services offered by The Martin Luther King Multi-Service Center, North United Methodist Church, and other providers • Schedule institution programming to occur at Tarkington Park venues. (e.g., dance performances, music, sports) 1 5 2 6 3 7 4 INITIATIVES OBJECTIVE: ENHANCE THE EFFICIENCY AND EFFECTIVENESS OF THE ANCHORS IN FULFILLMENT OF THEIR MISSION BY ADDRESSING PROJECTS, PROGRAMS, AND POLICIES WITHIN MIDTOWN, INDIANAPOLIS, AND THE REGION THROUGH A SHARED VALUE STRATEGY collaboration & engagement
  50. 50. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 201646 ˆ ˆˆˆˆˆˆˆ ˆˆˆˆˆˆ ˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆ ˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆˆ HOUSING STUDY AREA 1 butler-tarkington neighborhood LOCAL INITIATIVE SUPPORT CORPORATION great places 2020 focus area HOUSING STUDY AREA 3 crown hill neighborhood HOUSING STUDY AREA 1 rocky ripple HOUSING STUDY AREA 2 butler-tarkington neighborhood HOUSING STUDY AREA 1 golden hill neighborhood HOUSING STUDY AREA 3 clifton on the river neighborhood 38TH STREET MICHIGANROAD BERTHA ROSS PARK CEN TRALCAN AL I-65
  51. 51. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 47 HOUSING & NEIGHBORHOOD housing & neighborhood MAINTAIN + ENHANCE: NEIGHBORHOODS WITH STRONG OR INCREASING INDICATORS PARTNER + PROMOTE: NEIGHBORHOODS WITH STABLE TO DECLINING INDICATORS THAT ARE VULNERABLE TO FURTHER DECLINE RESTORE + REVITALIZE: NEIGHBORHOODS WITH CHALLENGED AND DECLINING INDICATORS THAT ARE FACING SIGNIFICANT OBSTACLES Observation & Analysis: ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ Many factors can drive housing and commercial development near an institution. This includes concentrated employment; the student population; need for support services; and activity from special events, visitors, and local suppliers. Many anchors have made their campuses and communities more inviting by developing mixed-use districts at their edges to capture and cultivate this demand. Other institutions have gone further, showing how anchors can facilitate dramatic changes in land use and shared value, using real estate development to drive local economic growth. Only 12% of the Midtown anchor institutions’ 2,312 employees live in the two ZIP codes which comprise the area around the Midtown Anchor Coalition. There is a shared value opportunity to incentivize the anchor institution employees to live close to where they work. For the anchors, it becomes a talent attraction tool while also generating stability in the surrounding neighborhood and demand for commercial services and amenities. The direct cost of incentivizing employees to live close to where they work can be significant, depending on the goals of the anchor institution and the degree to which that anchor institution can access matching funds from other sources. However, the anchor institution should frame those costs relative to the costs of employee hiring and retention. Estimates of the cost of employee turnover are as much as 150 percent of annual salary for higher salaried employees and lower for hourly or lower salaried employees. A housing incentive program for employees can be a unique tool to attract and retain talent in an anchor institution. Further, as opposed to a higher salary or bonus, a housing incentive program has the added benefit of being a multiplier by impacting the neighborhood surrounding the anchor institution with a new household. An employee living closer to work can open up more options for transportation: transit, walking or biking. Since transportation is the second largest expense for the average household, mobility options can reduce annual transportation costs which can help free up discretionary spending and drive the local economy. REDEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES: Currently, about 12% of Midtown Anchor Coalition employees live in Midtown ZIP codes 46208 and 46228. midtown anchor employees’ place of residence
  52. 52. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 201648 RENEW INDIANAPOLIS 0 PARCELS - 0% OF TOTAL VACANT HOMES/PROPERTY 86 PARCELS - 3.4% OF TOTAL BROWNFIELDS 0 PARCELS - 0% OF TOTAL MARION COUNTY SURPLUS 0 PARCELS - 0% OF TOTAL MARION COUNTY TAX SALE 8 PARCELS - 0.3% OF TOTAL 2,522 TOTALPARCELS 38TH STREET I-65 MICHIGANROAD CEN TRALCAN AL BERTHA ROSS PARK I-65
  53. 53. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 49 CHARACTER IMAGES HOUSING STUDY AREA 1 MAINTAIN & ENHANCE RECOMMENDED STRATEGY: Observation & Analysis: housing & neighborhood Homes located within the Golden Hill Neighborhood are larger, more secluded suburban-style lots, uncharacteristic of the larger area. The Butler-Tarkington Neighborhood is characterized by larger, well-maintained single- family homes with mature trees and established landscaping. The Rocky Ripple neighborhood is a heavily wooded area resulting in a wide range of housing options and lot conditions. The neighborhood of Rocky Ripple, which is inside a bend of the White River, along 56th Street and west of the Central Canal, is at the far northern end of the study area. With some homes predating WWII, most of the houses were built in the 1950’s and 1960’s. Currently, vacancy is low, and the residential neighborhood is known for being tight-knit. The Butler Tarkington Neighborhood is largely very stable north of 42nd Street to the Central Canal, between Butler University and Meridian Street. Built out beginning in the 19th century as an extension of Mapleton, the area really started to develop in the 20th century as a middle-class neighborhood. In response to racial tension and white flight in the 1950’s, though, the Butler-Tarkington Neighborhood Association was formed to foster “better communication among residents,” and prevent “panic selling,” and “block busting.” Since then, BTNA’s efforts have led to the successful stabilization of an economically and racially integrated neighborhood, with a mix of residents, from long-term home owners to college students. These neigbhorhoods along the Central Canal are facing significant flood risk until flood walls are improved, leading to significantly higher insurance rates. This threatens the viability of the area, and home values could suffer. The Golden Hill neighborhood is the former estate of the Parry Family, who built their mansion in 1905. The rest of the land was platted in 1915 for upper-class homes at the time, and many current owners are descendants of friends or families of the original owners, keeping its status as a dignified neighborhood solidified. The only prominent commercial node is located on Illinois Street, at 56th Street. A few restaurants, some services, and a small established grocery store serve nearby residents, employees, and students. Strategies for Implementation: • Prioritize market-rate, infill development which optimizes density to drive financial feasibility • Identify residential, retail and office segments which are absent in the Midtown market and seek private developers and investment to fill that demand • Proactively work with private developers and the public sector to support excellence in design and sustainable development practices • Focus public sector investment in private sector projects to infrastructure and connectivity enhancements • Build on the strong brand of Midtown to compete for economically mobile households
  54. 54. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 201650 RENEW INDIANAPOLIS 0 PARCELS - 0.0% OF TOTAL VACANT HOMES/PROPERTY 200 PARCELS - 12.9% OF TOTAL BROWNFIELDS 3 PARCELS - 0.1% OF TOTAL MARION COUNTY SURPLUS 19 PARCELS - 1.2% OF TOTAL MARION COUNTY TAX SALE 53 PARCELS - 3.4% OF TOTAL 1,548 TOTALPARCELS MICHIGANROAD BERTHA ROSS PARK I-65 38TH STREET CEN TRALCAN AL
  55. 55. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 51 PARTNER & PROMOTE RECOMMENDED STRATEGY: Observation & Analysis: HOUSING STUDY AREA 2 housing & neighborhood CHARACTER IMAGES Much of the housing stock in this area are smaller rental units, occupied primarily for student housing, resulting in a wide-range of conditions and required maintenance. Two smaller commercial nodes exist on Boulevard Place within the area, however, they offer very few day-to-day services and they have historically witnessed a high rate of turn-over. Much of the area is characterized by smaller, single-family homes, with very few options for multi-family condo or apartment choices. This southern portion of Butler Tarkington Neighborhood, located between Haughey Avenue and Boulevard Place, north of 38th Street to Hampton Drive, is less stable than areas to the north. The student population of Butler and CTS is concentrated here. This leads to higher tenant turnover, and a higher amount of complaints from students’ behavior, during school months. But generally, the University administration, student government, Butler- Tarkington Neighborhood Association, and landlords cooperate effectively on these issues. The larger issue is often with under-maintained homes owned by absentee landlords. An electric inner-urban streetcar system, built out in the late 19th century along what is today Dr. MLK Jr Blvd., Illinois Street, 34th Street, and Boulevard Place north of 38th Street, led to the subdivision of what used to be farms and orchards north of the town of Mapleton. In response to racial tension and white flight in the 1950’s, though, the BTNA was formed to foster “better communication among residents,” and prevent “panic selling,” and “block busting.” Since then, Butler-Tarkington Neighborhood Association’s efforts have led to the successful stabilization of an economically and racially integrated neighborhood, with a mix of residents, from long-term home owners to college students, particularly in this section. Two small commercial nodes with potential are located on Boulevard Place at 40th Street and 42nd Street, but quieter summer months without students could present a problem for these nodes reaching their full potential. Strategies for Implementation: • Prioritize market-rate, infill development which optimizes density to drive financial feasibility • Seek public sector investment in infrastructure, services and amenities to drive private sector development and investment • Work with private developers and the public sector to support excellence in design and sustainable development practices • Focus public sector investment in private sector projects to infrastructure and connectivity enhancements and, in some cases, gap financing • Leverage the expertise of organizations like Indianapolis Neighborhood Housing Partnership (INHP) to provide homeownership and homeowner repair programs and incentives to attract anchor employees as a driver of demand
  56. 56. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 201652 RENEW INDIANAPOLIS 71 PARCELS - 3.9% OF TOTAL VACANT HOMES/PROPERTY 419 PARCELS - 23.0% OF TOTAL BROWNFIELDS 13 PARCELS - 0.7% OF TOTAL MARION COUNTY SURPLUS 129 PARCELS - 7.1% OF TOTAL MARION COUNTY TAX SALE 57 PARCELS - 3.1% OF TOTAL 1,822 TOTALPARCELS I-65 MICHIGANROAD BERTHA ROSS PARK 38TH STREET CEN TRALCAN AL
  57. 57. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 53 CHARACTER IMAGES RESTORE & REVITALIZE RECOMMENDED STRATEGY: Observation & Analysis: HOUSING STUDY AREA 3 housing & neighborhood Efforts for revitalization in the area should target blocks where favorable existing housing stock already exist to capitalize on shared impact. The physical condition of many homes in the area are degrading and in need of repair. Many homes in the area are currently abandoned with boarded up doors and windows, adding to the impression of crime and security concerns. The neighborhoods around 38th Street and Illinois, south to 30th , as well as areas west of Dr. MLK Jr. Blvd., face many challenges. Crime, poverty, and vacancy rates are among the highest in the city near 34th Street and Illinois Street, and many properties have been lost to foreclosure and abandonment. This is addressed in more detail in the Safety and Security section. Mapleton, founded at what is now Illinois and 38th Streets as early as the 1840’s, was a small farming community with most residents living between Meridian Street and the cemetery. The area didn’t fully develop until an electric inner-urban streetcar system, built out in the late 19th century along what is today Dr. MLK Jr Blvd., Illinois Street, 34th Street, and Boulevard Place north of 38th Street. Most homes today mirror the streetcar suburb form, and were built in the first part of the 20th century. Major Commercial nodes are located along 38th Street near Illinois. The former Winona Hospital has been redeveloped into affordable housing along Illinois Street at 33rd Street, and other community development efforts have taken place recently. The Local Initiative Support Coalition’s Great Places 2020 initiative is targeting the area around 38th and Illinois, and The Mayor’s Office is leading a focused effort across many organizations, both public and private, to curb crime as well. This is addressed in more detail in the Safety and Security section. Strategies for Implementation: • Partner with philanthropy on long-term planning, visioning and capacity-building • Seek public (federal, state, local) support for select demolition or stabilization of vulnerable single family housing stock • Engage the city in stronger policing efforts and code enforcement • Leverage federal programs like Community Development Block Grants (CDBG), HOME Investment Partnerships Program (HOME) and Low Income Housing Tax Credits to develop new, professionally managed multi-family housing to help drive demand for services and amenities • Proactively work with private developers and the public sector to support excellence in design and sustainable development practices • Link housing programs and initiatives with essential supportive services in partnership with other organizations
  58. 58. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 201654 STABILIZE & ENHANCE RESIDENTIAL AREAS WITHIN THE BUTLER-TARKINGTON AND CROWN HILL NEIGHBORHOODS, WHILE POSITIVELY IMPACTING OTHER NEIGHBORHOODS OF MIDTOWN GOAL:
  59. 59. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 2016 55 BUILD ON AND SUPPORT THE MOMENTUM AT 38TH STREET AND ILLINOIS STREET BY COLLABORATING WITH THE 38TH AND ILLINOIS GREAT PLACES 2020 COMMITTEE ON AN ONGOING BASIS • Engage in the refinement and implementation of plans and initiatives for L.O.V.E. – Livability, Opportunity, Vitality, Education DEVELOP AN INCENTIVE PROGRAM FOR ANCHOR INSTITUTION EMPLOYEES TO LIVE CLOSE TO WHERE THEY WORK • Working with the Indianapolis Neighborhood Housing Partnership, Indy Hub, the Indy Chamber, and other partners, develop a direct forgivable loan pool, and mortgage financing products to incentivize existing and new employees to consider living in Midtown SUPPORT SOCIO-ECONOMIC DIVERSITY IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEW RENTAL AND FOR-SALE HOUSING PRODUCTS THAT ARE UNDER-REPRESENTED IN THE MARKETPLACE AND MIDTOWN, ENSURING LONG-TERM AFFORDABILITY • Collaborate with Near North Development Corporation, and others, to identify and market available properties to reputable developers experienced in Section 42/Low-Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC), the primary federal program for encouraging the investment of private equity in the development of affordable rental housing for low-income households LEVERAGE PUBLIC-PRIVATE PROGRAMS FOR FOCUSED HOUSING STRATEGIES IN SURROUNDING NEIGHBORHOODS, BASED ON KEY MARKET, PHYSICAL, AND DEMOGRAPHIC INDICATORS: • Maintain + Enhance – neighborhoods with strong or increasing indicators focused on code enforcement, and support from the private sector • Partner + Promote – neighborhoods with stable to declining indicators that are vulnerable to further decline focused on code enforcement, targeted infill redevelopment opportunities, and support from the public sector • Restore + Revitalize – neighborhoods with challenged and declining indicators that are facing significant obstacles focused on code enforcement, broad infill redevelopment opportunities, and support from the philanthropic and public sectors PROMOTE THE DEVELOPMENT OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY KEY NODES IN ALIGNMENT WITH MARKET OPPORTUNITIES, THE ANCHOR INSTITUTIONS, AND THE BRAND OF MIDTOWN: • Primary: Corner of 42nd Street and Clarendon Road; corner of 42nd Street and Michigan Road • Secondary: 38th Street and Illinois Street (multiple owners); 42nd and Boulevard (multiple owners); 40th Street and Boulevard Place (multiple owners) IDENTIFY AND SUPPORT THE GROWTH OF LOCAL BUSINESSES IN MIDTOWN, OR WITH INTEREST IN LOCATING TO MIDTOWN • Utilize the Butler Business Consulting Group and Center for Closely-Held Businesses to nurture locally-owned Midtown-area businesses 1 5 6 2 3 4 INITIATIVES housing & neighborhood OBJECTIVE: AS A CATALYST FOR NEW DEMAND AND INVESTMENT, INCREASE THE NUMBER OF ANCHOR INSTITUTION EMPLOYEES LIVING CLOSER TO WHERE THEY WORK THROUGH NEW HOUSING OPTIONS, CREATIVE FINANCING AND INCENTIVE PROGRAMS, AND NEIGHBORHOOD AMENITIES
  60. 60. MIDTOWN ANCHOR COALITION FRAMEWORK PLAN i 201656 the michigan road corridor presents an opportunity to establish a gateway/arrival sequence for regional visitors with improved pedestrian and bicycle improvements the dr mlk jr. blvd corridor presents an opportunity to establish a gateway/ arrival sequence for regional visitors with improved pedestrian and bicycle improvements the illinois and meridian street corridors present an opportunity to establish more of a visual presence for local and regional visitors momentum from the great places 2020 focus area presents an opportunity to leverage those investments and revitalize the 40th street corridor 2 1 1 g g 2 1 2 recent investments in clarendon road by the department of public works represent an opportunity to establish a new southern gateway to the area g g g 38TH STREET I-65 MICHIGANROAD CENTRALCANAL MAJOR ARTERIAL STREETS IMPORTANT GATEWAY INITIATIVE - SEE PAGE 61 FOR MORE INFORMATION g #

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