Abolitionists

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Abolitionists

  1. 1. Abolitionists Standard 4-6.2 Explain the contributions of abolitionists to the mounting tensions between the North and South over slavery, including William Lloyd Garrison, Sojourner Truth, Fredrick Douglas, Harriet Tubman, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and John Brown Learning Objective: SWBAT explain the impact of abolitionists on the tensions between the north and south. Essential Question: What impact did abolitionist have on the mounting tensions between the North and South over slavery?
  2. 2. What does it mean to be an Abolitionist?
  3. 3. Abolitionist- Person who wants to abolish, or end, slavery.
  4. 4. Major Abolitionists of the Civil War Era Fredrick Douglass William Lloyd Garrison Harriet Tubman Harriet Beecher Stowe John Brown Sojourner Truth
  5. 5. Fredrick Douglass Fredrick Douglass was a former slave who escaped to freedom disguising himself as a sailor.
  6. 6. Douglass was a writer, editor, and leading abolitionist. He edited The North Star newspaper, which was an anti-slavery newspaper.
  7. 7. William Lloyd Garrison Journalist, reformer, and founder of the antislavery newspaper The Liberator
  8. 8. Harriet Tubman Abolitionist who escaped from slavery in 1849
  9. 9. Tubman became a conductor on the Underground Railroad, she led more than 300 slaves to freedom. Hiding Spaces
  10. 10. John Brown Abolitionist who believed in the use of force to oppose slavery. He was hanged for leading a raid on Harpers Ferry, Virginia.
  11. 11. Sojourner Truth Abolitionist and women’s rights leader who escaped from slavery in 1827. She became a preacher and preached about the evils of slavery.
  12. 12. Harriet Beecher Stowe Author of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, which exposed the cruelties of slavery to a wide audience before the Civil War.

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