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Project Management in Advertising

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Learn about how project management works in advertising.

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Project Management in Advertising

  1. 1. Project Management in Advertising Kaye I. Smith
  2. 2. What is Project Management? Delivering on time, on budget and high quality initiatives that meet or exceed client (and internal) expectations. Definition: Project Manager  The liaison between internal departments whose sole responsibility is to keep all projects moving efficiently  The guardian of the agency’s manufacturing process  Allows Account Management time to address client facing issues, strategy and planning 2
  3. 3. Why is Project Management important? Clients are forcing us to defy the triple constraint The agency wants to remain profitable and competitive Cost Time Quality 3
  4. 4. Over-Arching Goals Determine appropriate Work Flow Path for each project (Job Streaming) Get work through the Agency efficiently and accurately Save Clients and Agency costly mistakes due to miscommunication Involve appropriate participants in approval process Avoid redundancy of tasks Expose all Project Managers to the various channels in the Agency
  5. 5. Challenges Complexity of our assignments (skills needed, parties involved, etc) Account Executives sharing Project Management duties The number of people involved in an engagement Short cuts = Survival tactics Increasing number of clients moving from“Agency side to “Client side” Decrease in client spending and increased level of expectations Ourselves: it has always been done this way Roles not clearly defined Who’s covering what base? Everyone knows what has to be done Few seem to practice a common process and Little understanding as to who is responsible for what tasks. 5
  6. 6. CLIENT MAKES REQUEST Account Mgmnt. Talks to Client Account Mgmnt. Talks to Creative Creative Talks to Art Buying Creative Talks to Production Art Buyer Talks to Production and Creative Cinque Talks to Vendors Account Mgmnt. Talks to Media
  7. 7. Team Members (from the outside in) Media Production (developers) Finance Project Manager Client Client Services External Vendors Strategy & Planning Creative
  8. 8. Primary Process Conversation Team Members Inter-Dept Conversation (from the outside in) Intra-Dept Conversation Media Business Manager Interactive Lead HTML Cost Control QA Production Client Acct. Mgmt Lead AE Project Manager Data Analyst Print Producer Mech Artist Studio Lead Strategy & Insights Lead Strategic Comm Digital Producers Retoucher Integrated Services Creative Lead Copy Writer Art Buying Art Director Editorial Svcs
  9. 9. Project Lifecycle: Engagement through Completion 9
  10. 10. Project Lifecycle Engagement Planning Concepting & Creation Mechanical & Technical Development Production & Execution 10
  11. 11. Delivery Tools
  12. 12. Delivery Tools Engagement & Planning Tools Client Input Brief Statement of work Project Plan Creative Brief Methodologies Account Governance Communications Tracking Tools & Processes Risk Management Change Management Financial Tracking 12
  13. 13. Engagement and Planning Tools DATE VERSION CREATIVE BRIEF CLIENT ASSIGNMENT NAME JOB NUMBER ACCOUNT PROJECT LEAD PROJECT MANAGEMENT TARGET DATE TO BRIEF CREATIVE TEAM 1 XX/XX/XX XX Name Lorem ipsum XXX-XXX-XXXXXX XXXXXXX XXXXXX Name XX/XX/XXXX WHAT DO WE WANT COMMUNICATIONS TO ACCOMPLISH? Be realistic and precise – what action do we want to inspire in the target? Trial? Loyalty? Consideration? What else should communications do? Ecte magna feum volenisim volobor eraestisi etum zzrilit ipsuscing esto do exer se magna facilit alis nulput utat numsan enit ut et lan ent lum etummodo et, vulluptatum veliquis num quisis nibh ex essi elis adigniamet lore minci tat. duisi eum in utatisl erat, vel ullan utat, quis adiamet ad tisl dionsequis ex et lortin henim venissim ate duissen iamcon henim iuscidunt ad minci tat. duisi eum in utatisl erat, vel ullan utat, quis adiamet ad tisl dion iamcon henim iuscidunt ad minci tat. duisi eum in utatisl erat, vel ullan utat, quis adiamet ad tisl dion Bullet Level 1 – Bullet Level 2  Bullet Level 3 2 WHAT ARE THE KEY DELIVERABLES, WHAT’S THE BUDGET, AND THE TIMING OF THIS INITIATIVE? Tell the creative team what’s required, when it’s required (when we have to present work to clients) what the “go live” date is and how much we can spend, if at all possible. Ecte magna feum volenisim volobor eraestisi etum zzrilit ipsuscing esto do exer se magna facilit alis nulput utat numsan enit ut et lan ent lum etummodo et, vulluptatum veliquis num quisis nibh ex essi elis adigniamet lore minci tat. duisi eum in utatisl 3 WHO ARE WE TALKING TO? Define the target as individuals, in the context of what we’re selling. Don’t overwhelm the team with demographics or segmentation data. Focus on what they think, how they act, and what choices they are currently making. What is currently guiding their behavior? iamcon henim iuscidunt ad minci tat. duisi eum in utatisl erat, vel ullan utat, quis Client Input Brief Statement of Work (SOW) Client’s guidance to agency Agency’s scoping document or project-level contract Creative Brief Agency’s guidance for creative development Campaign Tactics Deliverables 13
  14. 14. Client Input Brief Outlines clients strategic objectives Defines the metrics that will be used to judge project success Identifies the key deliverables expected as a result of the initiative Outlines who the client believes is the audience for their product/service Details budget, timing, specs and other constraints 14
  15. 15. Statement of Work Why create a statement of work? To ensure all parties have a clear understanding of what is to be delivered To build the documented foundation for the project What is included in the document? Objectives ROI Goals / Expected Results In/Out of Scope Deliverables (including number of rounds) Assumptions Known risks Escalation path Schedule Estimated costs 15
  16. 16. Statement of Work Detailed deliverable list item OK GOOD GREAT Email One (1) HTML Email One HTML Email – Includes three Creative rounds (two opportunities for revision and one final sign off) One HTML Email –Includes three Creative rounds (two opportunities for revision and one final sign off) Strategic Recommendation Strategy Deck Strategic Recommendations Presentation: Strategic Recommendations Presentation to include: • Outline – one client review • Draft – one client review • Final – on client review • Personas • Strategic Pillars • Brand hierarchy Deliverables: • Outline – one client review • Draft – one client review • Final – one client review • Presentation, on March 29th in Seattle, to client management team 16
  17. 17. Comprehensive Project Plan Plan of attack The list of deliverables and all of the detailed tasks needed to create them The timing needed for each task The work flow, what happens first, second, concurrently Milestones 17
  18. 18. Creative Brief Confirms and documents the Agency's strategic understanding of the initiative Provides detailed information and guidance to the creative team about the initiative, product and all relevant details Provides a compelling expression of the value proposition to spark the creative imagination Outlines production guidelines, budget guidelines, and schedule 18
  19. 19. Methodologies
  20. 20. Account Governance Managing an integrated full-cycle CRM program for clients requires a high-level of operational focus. In the planning phase: Determine how and when the team will communicate Agree on the review process and how feedback will be shared Identify stakeholders and when to involve them Marketing Plan Diagrams Created yearly and updated quarterly Detail upcoming campaigns, high level timing and dependencies on other business groups, partners, etc. ID 1 Project start 1 day ? Start Jul 16, '06 T W T Mon 7/17/06 2 next task 5 day s Tue 7/18/06 3 task two 3 day s Tue 7/25/06 4 Project work plans Task Name Duration task three 3 day s Fri 7/28/06 Jul 23, '06 F S S M T W T Jul 30, '06 F S S M T Outline the detailed dependencies on individual initiatives 20
  21. 21. Communications Status Reports and Meetings Meeting Reports Escalation Plans Extranets Post Project Reviews Email – friend or foe? 21
  22. 22. Status Reports HP Home & Home Office Store Weekly Status Report LEGEND On track no issue to budget or timeline Some risk to budget or timeline High risk to budget and timeline Week Of: Author: Project Name Job Number Kick off Date Deploy Date Project Deliverables A weekly status meeting should be held for all capabilities associated with an engagement. Team Agency Kick Off Date Release to YesMail Date Deploy Date Completed Tasks Next Steps Assigned To Items discussed will cover: Date Raised Deliverable Progress Summary of progress toward team goals Major agreements Priorities for the next week Project completion percentage During this meeting risks are reviewed and assigned to ensure risk mitigation 22 Open Issue Mitigation Strategy Assigned To Date Raised Items for management attention (escalated issues) Risk Mitigation Strategy Assigned To
  23. 23. Communications Meeting Reports: Every meeting and call should be followed with a documented, shared report of the discussion, decisions, and action items Escalation plans: Up-to-date organizational charts for both agency and client with clear escalation points should communication need to be advanced Extranet: A secure, Web-based application that serves as a central repository to store and display all deliverables and critical documentation All deliverables and other critical project documentation is uploaded and resides in this location Serves as a central repository for capabilities to store files related to an initiative Client has a single point of access to all files related to a particular initiative All status reports, and other assets will also reside in this location 23
  24. 24. Communications Post Project Reviews: Agency self assessment completed at the end of every initiative Feedback is solicited from client and suggested improvements are shared with the client Allows each capability involved in an initiative to participate in how we can work better together for our clients Provides business organization improvement All feedback is presented in a constructive fashion and is provided by initiative participants Email: An amazing communication tool that is often abused Should be use thoughtfully. Assess the recipient’s ability to digest the information you are sending. Do not bombard your internal team or client with email If one consolidated communication will help keep the team more organized, use a Hot Sheet type of email sent once or twice a day. NOT several separate emails. 24
  25. 25. Tracking Tools & Processes
  26. 26. Risk Management What 90% of project leaders say: “Risk management is one of my top three responsibilities.” -and“I am too busy managing my crises to manage my risks.” 26
  27. 27. What is a risk? “An uncertain event or condition that, if it occurs, has a positive or negative effect on one or more project objectives..” – PMBOK, 5th Edition Often considered a state of uncertainty In our daily lives we manage risk as an inherent way of life Is it safe to cross the road? Will it rain today? So, why do we place it in a different “box” when we are at work “Yet another process” “No time to do it” “Not my problem” “People don’t want to hear about it” 27
  28. 28. What is Risk Management? The proactive identification, analysis, mitigation planning and monitoring of risk. 28
  29. 29. Why do risk management? History teaches us that it repeats itself Our clients are expecting us to proactively manage their business Understanding the landscape and potholes facilitates smooth delivery Planning for what could happen allows you to be better prepared when specific events materialize Through risk management planning discussions you can take advantage of both your experiences and the experience of your teammates 29
  30. 30. When should we perform risk management? In each moment of a project Risks and opportunities exist throughout every projects’ lifecycle At inception During pursuit of business Transformation of proposals to projects During the implementation of projects Delivery (ongoing) In Communications Make the risk management process part of the management of the project Integration with status reporting Integration with reviews Prioritize, prioritize, prioritize and then actually manage the priorities 30
  31. 31. Risk Management Reporting 31
  32. 32. Risk Management Reporting HP Home & Home Office Store Weekly Status Report LEGEND On track no issue to budget or timeline Some risk to budget or timeline High risk to budget and timeline Week Of: Author: Project Name Job Number Kick off Date Deploy Date Project Deliverables Agency Kick Off Date Release to YesMail Date Deploy Date Team Completed Tasks Next Steps · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Assigned To · · Date Raised Open Issue Mitigation Strategy Assigned To Date Raised Risk Mitigation Strategy Assigned To 2/16/2014, 1:16:43 AM 1 of 1 32
  33. 33. Risk Management Tool 33
  34. 34. Scoring Risk Impact 34
  35. 35. Exercise Sample Project Situation Identify Analyze Mitigate Monitor 35
  36. 36. Risk Management - Things to remember Take the time to identify risk when scoping/planning Review risk in every meeting and weekly status Having a plan to close risks will increase the win rate Use the process positively You cannot remove all threats, but you can identify and thus reduce them Celebrate success 36
  37. 37. Change Management
  38. 38. What is Change Management? The tools, people and procedures used to control changes to the scope of an initiative. 38
  39. 39. Why perform Change Management? Goals, objectives, knowledge and the business landscape are always changing It supports our clients ability to react to the changing marketplace in a timely fashion Ensures all parties have assessed the impact of a requested change and are prepared to handle it NOTE: Not every change results in an increase of cost or time. 39
  40. 40. How to perform Change Management? You must: Have a clearly defined scope Identify, document and share/escalate any deviation from that scope Assess the impact and whether the change in scope is “worth it” What is the impact to cost, timing, quality? How will this affect other initiatives? Is the rationale strong enough? Get approval before taking on any liability Take the time to do Change Management! 40
  41. 41. Financial Tracking
  42. 42. Financial Management No matter what account you work on and what tools you have at your disposal, you are responsible for the financial health of your initiative. Everyone on your team should know their responsibilities and the amount of time they have to perform them – Make people accountable Look at the whole picture Manpower Vendor and out of pocket (pass-thru) costs Materials Red flag and escalate problems before they get out of hand 42
  43. 43. Top Takeaways Each agency function performs an essential role Use your tools, they inform and guide the process Follow best practices, it ensures development of high quality, strategic, compelling plans and creative The end goal is the best work possible in the most efficient way possible 43
  44. 44. Thank You Contact me: Kaye.Smith@pmiam.com Visit PM I Am blog to see more tips on project management

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