Chapter 01 writing process ed kl copy

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  • Teaching Strategies: Chapter 1 CompositionChapter Goal: Develop an understanding of the writing process and write a clear, organized paragraph.The Writing ProcessHelp students to feel more comfortable about writing by reminding them that every writer approaches the process differently. You might even share your typical process.
  • I split the learning objective into two parts here so that instructors could focus on one aspect at a time. The first 11 slides—through the Quick Review Questions—deal with the writing process while the remaining slides deal with building a paragraph. Some students will be especially resistant to the idea of “steps” to writing. These are often considered “right-brained thinkers.” Reassure them that their concerns will be addressed and that they too can conquer the writing process. (You’ll probably want to read over p. 15-16 specifically to prep for this part of the discussion.)
  • Although these steps frequently fall in the order listed, they may be rearranged and repeated to accomplish your purpose. The object is to create a good piece of writing, not just to follow the steps.
  • **Activity**“PrewritingSince prewriting is the part of the process most beginning writers pay the least attention to, stress the benefits of an early start to prewriting. Be consistent in requiring prewriting for every writing assignment.Prewriting is thinking, and the more thought you put into your paper, the stronger it will be” (Arlov 3). Some examples of prewriting activities include: brainstorming, mapping (bubble maps), and freewriting. What kinds of prewriting did you do in previous English courses? (Wait for responses). Did you find it effective? If yes, then suggest students use that method for their prewriting today. If no, then suggest another alternative for them to try. Few students have tried freewriting as it’s meant to be done. This might be a moment to let them give it a shot. Directions: You’re going to write for the next 5 minutes on your topic. Write everything that comes into your head. Even when you don’t have anything to say, write that. The important thing is to keep your pen constantly moving for the entire time. (It makes your brain keep working, even when you think you’re done.) Then assign a random topic for students to prewrite about for 3-5 minutes.
  • PlanningPlanning is essential to good writing. While students may mistakenly believe that planning (or creating an outline) is a waste of time, tell students that careful planning almost always saves time in drafting. Some instructors refuse to allow students to move to the next stage without prewriting and planning.A traditional form of planning is to outline your essay. Some people prefer a bullet list with subpoints. Planning is one of the most important steps in the writing process—because it keeps you on track as you write your paper. Many people find it useful after they’ve written their rough draft to go back to their original plan and see if they’ve included everything they had wanted.
  • DraftingRemind students that drafting is a creative part of the writing process; they should not use their ““critical”” eyes at this point. The most important thing is to get all the good ideas on paper—— without stopping for grammar, punctuation, or word choice. Some writers benefit from turning off the spelling and grammar checkers on their computers.Writers who have invested adequate time and energy in prewriting and planning should be able to follow the plan smoothly and easily. However, remind students who hit an occasional ““block”” to keep writing. Stopping or giving up in frustration doesn’’t help.Know that no one writes a perfect paper. Everyone ends up revising his or her writing. Consider Ernest Hemingway, who wrote and rewrote the same chapter 39 times! And, he’s a legendary writer. The important thing to remember when you’re drafting is that your goal is to get all of your ideas down on paper. Some of it you’ll keep and some you’ll throw away, but you’ll never know if you don’t write it all down.
  • RevisingStudents need to understand that revising is not just correcting grammar and punctuation. Revising is looking at content and organization. It is determining if the paper says what the writer intended it to say.Encourage students to use their resources, such as classmates, tutors, or writing center staff, to learn about strengths and weaknesses of the draft. Encourage students to use a computer from the beginning to the end of the writing process. A student who has typed a paper will be more likely to try moving a paragraph to improve organization than a student who has handwritten his or her draft. The ability to move a paragraph with a few key strokes makes the option much easier and less time consuming.Revisingshould come after a twenty-four hour break, so you can see your writing with fresh eyes. 24-hours may not always be possible, but it is important that you give yourself a mental break from your paper for a little while so that you can return with fresh eyes. It’s in the revision stage that you’re going to perfect the content of your paper.
  • ProofreadingAlthough proofreading provides the final polish to a piece of writing, students who procrastinate may not have time to give their papers this finishing touch. Remind them that spelling, grammar, and typographical errors may ruin the impression of an otherwise excellent paper.Activity: Have students work with a partner. The partner will read the paper aloud to the writer, allowing the writer to more clearly hear the message conveyed by the paper, as well as mechanical problems.**Activity**The Writing Process: Carla’’s EssayUse the development of Carla’’s essay to demonstrate how one person works through the steps to create a paper.Activity: If time allows, demonstrate, using technology available (overhead, Smartboard, computer, and projector), the entire writing process.During the demonstration of this paper, remind students that the process is not always linear. In other words, some proofreading may take place during drafting, and some prewriting may occur even after a draft is developed.Having students look over Carla’s writing process (starts on p. 6) to see how all the steps relate and to give them a “real world” example may be particularly helpful here. Carla’s process also touches upon a writing group, so this may be the perfect place to introduce that idea to the students, if it’s something that will be used in your course. If You Hate the Thought of a Step-by-Step Approach……Use the six questions to help your students determine whether they are naturally left-brain or right-brain thinkers. This information may help them to understand what they need to do to maximize their abilities.Tips for Right-Brained WritersEncourage students who answered ““yes”” to three or more of the questions to use the tips offered for right-brain thinkers.
  • **Activity**Page 13 gives further explanation of the “quick takes.” When teaching this chapter, I ask for student volunteers to read a quick take, and then I expound as needed. One of the most important points I make in my class is that writing is a skill that anyone can master. This doesn’t mean it’s going to be easy but it’s doable. And, we’re constantly writing so learning this skill will help students throughout life (even though they don’t always believe me).
  • You’ll want to acknowledge that the answer for question 1 is B but that students may find themselves using the process in a circular way, versus the linear path laid out by the process. Also, that students should be thinking in all of the steps of the process, but prewriting is the place for them to get all of their ideas out in a quick way.
  • Students often need the difference between revision and proofreading clarified repeatedly. Many have been trained to revise and really only proofread. They rarely consider moving paragraphs or adding content as part of the revision step. This may be the perfect place to point out that everyone has written a paper in one night, but it is a rare instance indeed that someone makes a good grade on their last-minute paper. Writing—and the thinking, drafting, revising, and such—take time to complete an outstanding paper.
  • Review of the ParagraphBefore you introduce essay writing, lead your students through a review of the basic building block of an essay——the paragraph.So that everyone is on the same footing, we’re going to review the “building block” of all essays—the paragraph. It’s important that you can write a strong paragraph so you can write a strong essay. (It’s that whole walk-before-you-run thing.) Use ““The Topic Sentence, The Supporting Sentences, and The Summary Sentence”” to remind students that every piece of writing should have a beginning (topic sentence which introduces the subject and the perspective or point about that subject), a middle (supporting sentences which prove or develop the point stated in the topic sentence), and an end (the summary sentence or conclusion which brings the paragraph to a definite close).
  • Use ““The Topic Sentence, The Supporting Sentences, and The Summary Sentence”” to remind students that every piece of writing should have a beginning (topic sentence which introduces the subject and the perspective or point about that subject), a middle (supporting sentences which prove or develop the point stated in the topic sentence), and an end (the summary sentence or conclusion which brings the paragraph to a definite close).The next slide is an example of a topic sentence.
  • **Activity**This sentence above the line is a sample topic sentence. Ask students to answer the questions orally. The topic of the paragraph is “writing an essay,” and the specific point being made is “can be difficult.” So, what is this paragraph going to focus on? (The difficulties of writing an essay.)
  • Use ““The Topic Sentence, The Supporting Sentences, and The Summary Sentence”” to remind students that every piece of writing should have a beginning (topic sentence which introduces the subject and the perspective or point about that subject), a middle (supporting sentences which prove or develop the point stated in the topic sentence), and an end (the summary sentence or conclusion which brings the paragraph to a definite close).Supporting sentences do just as their name implies. They support the topic sentence, making the paragraph strong enough to stand on its own.
  • **Activity” Use ““The Topic Sentence, The Supporting Sentences, and The Summary Sentence”” to remind students that every piece of writing should have a beginning (topic sentence which introduces the subject and the perspective or point about that subject), a middle (supporting sentences which prove or develop the point stated in the topic sentence), and an end (the summary sentence or conclusion which brings the paragraph to a definite close).**Activity**Direct students to look at the model paragraph on p. 17 to see how all three types of sentences come together to build a strong paragraph.
  • **Activity**There are several writing assignments at the end of the chapter so that students can practice their skills and demonstrate their understanding of the writing process as well as assignments on MyWritingLab.
  • Chapter 01 writing process ed kl copy

    1. 1. Chapter 1: The Writing Process
    2. 2. Learning Objective: Develop an understanding of the writing process and write a clear, organized paragraph.
    3. 3. Writing is a process. The five steps are:  Prewriting,  Planning,  Drafting,  Revising,  Proofreading.
    4. 4. Prewriting is… thinking both on and off paper to generate and gather your ideas.
    5. 5. Planning is… the organizational step that sorts out your ideas into main ideas and supporting details. This is also the step that enables you to develop your thesis statement, the “cornerstone of your essay.”
    6. 6. Drafting is…  setting out your prewriting and planning information in essay form.  getting all your ideas down on paper without trying to make them perfect; that step comes later.
    7. 7. Revising is…  When you ensure that you have developed your thesis throughout the essay and developed the topic of each paragraph, tying everything together with smooth transitions.  When you assess your paper critically for phrasing, placement, and content.
    8. 8. Proofreading…  Provides the opportunity to fine tune your grammar, word choice, punctuation, transitions, and personal common errors, such as typos.  Careful proofreading will produce a polished essay you can be proud of.
    9. 9. “Five Quick Takes on Writing” 1. Take it a step at a time. 2. Take it seriously. 3. Take it easy. 4. Take it to the limit. 5. Take it with you.
    10. 10. Quick Review Questions 1. The steps in the writing process go in the following order: a) prewriting, drafting, revising, planning, proofre ading. b) prewriting, planning, drafting, revising, proofre ading. c) planning, prewriting, drafting, proofreading, re vising. d) planning, prewriting, revising, drafting, proofre ading. 2. The “thinking” part of the process is Learning Objective: Develop an understanding of the writing process
    11. 11. Quick Review Answers 1. The steps in the writing process go in the following order: a) prewriting, drafting, revising, planning, proofreadi ng. b) prewriting, planning, drafting, revising, proofre ading. c) planning, prewriting, drafting, proofreading, revisi ng. d) planning, prewriting, revising, drafting, proofreadi ng. 2. The “thinking” part of the process is a) planning. Learning Objective: Develop an understanding of the b) proofreading. process writing
    12. 12. Quick Review Questions 3. Revising often involves a) making an outline. b) making big changes in content. c) making grammar corrections. d) making changes without a computer. 4. The writing process a) should focus on complete, correct sentences at every step. b) should be done quickly, within a few hours. c) typically takes at least a few days. d) involves going through each step once. Learning Objective: Develop an understanding of the writing process
    13. 13. Quick Review Answers 3. Revising often involves a) making an outline. b) making big changes in content. c) making grammar corrections. d) making changes without a computer. 4. The writing process a) should focus on complete, correct sentences at every step. b) should be done quickly, within a few hours. c) typically takes at least a few days. d) involves going through each step once. Learning Objective: Develop an understanding of the writing process
    14. 14. Paragraphs…  To write a college level essay, you must remember the importance of creating each paragraph so well that it could clearly stand on its own. To do this, consider the roles of the topic sentence, the supporting sentences, and the summary sentence.
    15. 15. The topic sentence…  presents the general topic of the paragraph,  makes specific points about your topic.
    16. 16. Writing an essay can be difficult. What’s the topic of this paragraph? What’s the specific point being made?
    17. 17. Supporting sentences…  Develop the topic.  Add detail or examples.  Any information that does not reinforce the topic must be left out.
    18. 18. The Summary Sentence…  serves to wrap up your paragraph.  It may either sum up the paragraph or restate the topic in any way that clearly signals the end of the paragraph
    19. 19. Spot Check: The supporting sentences of a paragraph a) give the paragraph direction. b) provide examples and details. c) restate the main idea. d) make broad, general statements. Learning Objective: Write a clear, organized paragraph.
    20. 20. Spot Check: The supporting sentences of a paragraph a) give the paragraph direction. b) provide examples and details. c) restate the main idea. d) make broad, general statements. Learning Objective: Write a clear, organized paragraph.

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