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Newspaper print-resource-front-cover-semiotic-analysis

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Semiotic analysis of newspaper covers

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Newspaper print-resource-front-cover-semiotic-analysis

  1. 1. Semiotic Analysis 1Media Studies - News | Semiotic Analysis Media Studies - News Every element of a newspaper can be analysed for us to conduct a semiotic analysis. But, to get started, there are a few basics to consider to get you started and considering the tone. • Masthead • Layout & Style • Language Look at the front page of the Guardian and the analysis below. Masthead The word ‘guardian’ has connotations of safety, custodianship and protection. Maybe this links to the ownership by The Scott Trust Ltd, formed to “safeguard the journalistic freedom and liberal values of The Guardian free from commercial or political interference.” The suggestion is that this newspaper is the keeper of ‘good, honest journalism’ as it is not controlled by owners, advertisers or political parties and is free to say what it wants. The masthead is written all in lowercase and a uses a curved font, unlike most other newspapers, which use block, capitalised text. This uniqueness is, arguably, a more personal mode of address, one which offers an alternative form of journalism to the rest of the industry. Language As expected the language is formal and at times suggests that a certain level of education or at least a good vocabulary is needed to understand the articles fully. For example Rowena Mason’s article on the public grilling of Theresa May uses phrasing such as, “introduced external assessment of disability claimants rather than self-assessment, and introduced more stringent eligibility criteria.” The paper also uses various devices expected of the medium such as the use of statistics and quotations directly from prominent people in the articles. In keeping with the style of the newspaper and the ideologies implied by the masthead - the headlines are not sensationalist or extreme - they are simple and give the impression of just providing the facts, suggesting that the reader is to make their own minds up.
  2. 2. Semiotic Analysis 2Media Studies - News | Semiotic Analysis Media Studies - News Layout & Style The page is very busy without being cluttered - it has an organised formal feel to it. The image is almost central to the page and the audiences’ eye will be drawn to it. The main headline is not related to the main image which suggests that no one story is more important than another - encouraging the audience to make their own mind up. There is the start of a few articles, which each continue inside - overall there is a calm and formal tone - nothing feels over the top or ‘in your face’ which suggests that the reader is not going to be bombarded with unnecessary information or exaggerations.
  3. 3. Semiotic Analysis 3Media Studies - News | Semiotic Analysis Media Studies - News Look at the front page of The Times and conduct a semiotic analysis. Consider: • Masthead • Layout & Style • Language • Anything else you think worthy of comment
  4. 4. Semiotic Analysis 4Media Studies - News | Semiotic Analysis Media Studies - News Now look at the front page of The Daily Mirror and conduct a semiotic analysis. Consider: • Masthead • Layout & Style • Language • Anything else you think worthy of comment

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